Étiquette : Gard

 

Persian Qanâts and the Civilization of Hidden Waters


By Karel Vereycken, July 2021.

World Day of handwashing, UNICEF.

By Karel Vereycken, July 2021.

At a time when old diseases make their return and new ones emerge worldwide, the tragic vulnerability of much of humanity poses an immense challenge.

One wonders whether to laugh or cry when international authorities trumpet without further clarification that to stop the Covid-19 pandemic, “all you have to do” is “wash your hands with soap and water”!

They forget one small detail: 3 billion people do not have facilities to wash their hands at home and 1.4 billion have no access to either water or soap!

Yet, since the dawn of time, mankind has demonstrated its capacity to mobilize its creative genius to make water available in the most remote places.

Here is a short presentation of a marvel of such human genius, the “qanâts”, an underground water conveyance system dating from the Iron Age. Probably of Egyptian origin, it was deployed on a large scale in Persia from the beginning of the 1st millennium BC.



The qanât or underground aqueduct

Typical cross-section of a qanât.

Sometimes called “horizontal drilling”, the qanât is an underground aqueduct employed to draw water from a water table and convey it by simple gravitational effect to urban settlements and farmland. The word qanât is an old Semitic word, probably Accadian, derived from a root qanat (reed) from which come canna and canal.

This “drainage gallery”, cut into the rock or built by man, is certainly one of the earliest and most ingenious inventions for irrigation in arid and semi-arid regions. The technique offers a significant advantage: by conveying water through an underground conduit, contrary to open air canals, not a single drop of water is wasted by evaporation.

Oases’ are NOT natural phenomena. All known oases are man-made. It is the qanât technique that allows man, in a given geographic configuration, to create oases in the middle of the desert, when a water table is close enough to the ground level or at a site close to the bed of a river lost in the sands of the desert.

From Mexico till China, diffusion of qanât technique.

Copied and expanded by the Romans, the qanât technique was carried across the Atlantic to the New World by the Spaniards, where many such underground canals still function in Peru and Chile. In fact, there are even Persian qanâts in western Mexico.


While today this three thousand year old technique may not be appropriate everywhere to solve current water scarcity problems in arid and semi-arid regions, it has much to inspire us as a demonstration of human genius at its best, that is, capable of doing a lot with a little.


The oases of Egypt

Egyptian man-made oasis of Dakhleh.



Today, 95% of the Egyptian population prospers on only 5% of its territory, mainly around the Nile delta. Hence, from the earliest days of Egyptian civilization, irrigation and water storage techniques for the Nile floods were developed in order to conserve this silty, nutrient-rich water for use throughout the year.

The river water was diverted and transported by canals to the fields by gravity. Since water from the Nile did not reach the oases, the Egyptians used the gushing water from the springs, which came from the large aquifer reserves of the western desert, and conveyed it to the fields by irrigation canals.

One of the fruits of this attempt to “conquer the desert” was a sustained habitation of the Dakhleh oasis throughout the Pharaonic period, explicable not only by a commercial interest on the part of the Egyptian state, but also by the new agricultural perspectives it offered.



Roman aqueducts

With its 170 km, 106 of which are underground, the Qanat of Gadara (now in Jordan) is the largest aqueduct of antiquity. It starts from a mountain water source held back by a dam (right) to supply a series of cities east of the Jordan River, in particular Gadara, near Lake Tiberias.
The Qanât Fi’raun, or aqueduct of Gadara, in Jordan.

Closer to us in time, the Qanât Fir’aun (The Watercourse of the Pharaoh) also known as the aqueduct of Gadara, a city today in Jordan. As far as we know, this 170 km long structure, depending on the geography, combines several bridge-aqueducts (of the same type as the Gard aqueduct in France) and 106 km of underground canals using the Persian qanât technique. It is not only the longest but also the most sophisticated aqueduct of antiquity, and the fruit of a years of hydraulic engineering.

In reality, the Romans, hiring persian water experts, did nothing more than terminate in the 2nd century an ancient project designed to supply water to the “Decapolis”, a collaborative group of ten cities founded by Greek and Macedonian settlers under the Seleucid king Antiochos III (223 – 187 BC), one of the successors of Alexander the Great.

These ten cities were located on the eastern border of the Roman Empire (now in Syria, Jordan and Israel), united by language, culture and political status, each with a degree of autonomy and self-rule. Its capital, Gadara, was home to more than 50,000 people and known for its cosmopolitan atmosphere, its own university attracting scholars, writers, artists, philosophers and poets. But this rich city lacked something existential : an abundance of water.

The Gadara qanat made the difference. “In the capital alone, there were thousands of fountains, watering holes and baths. Wealthy senators cooled themselves in private pools and decorated their gardens with cooling caves. The result was a record daily consumption of more than 500 liters of water per capita,” explains Matthias Schulz, author of a report on the aqueduct in Spiegel Online.

Entrance of the Gardara qanât, Jordan.



Persia

The Shahzadeh Garden in Iran, an oasis built with the age-old technique of qanats.
Maintenance



We all admire the roman aqueducts. But few of us are aware that the Romans only adapted the technique of the qanâts developed much earlier in Persia.

Indeed, it was under the Achaemenid Empire (around 559 – 330 BC.), that this technique spread slowly from Persia to the east and the west. Many qanâts can be found in North Africa (Morocco, Algeria, Libya), in the South East Asia (Iran, Oman, Iraq) and further east, in Central Asia, from Afghanistan to China (Xinjiang), via India.

The development of these “draining galleries” is attested in different regions of the world under various names: qanât and kareez in Iran, Syria and Egypt, kariz, kehriz in Pakistan and Afghanistan, aflaj in Oman, galeria in Spain, kahn in Balochistan, kanerjing in China, foggara in North Africa, khettara in Morocco, ngruttati in Sicily, etc.

Historically, the majority of the populations of Iran and other arid regions of Asia or North Africa depended on the water provided by the qanâts; their construction lifted entire areas to a higher “economic platform”, made deserts habitable and opened new land for agriculture. The map of demographic expansion followed the trail of the development of this new higher platform.


In his article « Du rythme naturel au rythme humain : vie et mort d’une technique traditionnelle, le qanât » (From natural rhythm to human rhythm: the life and death of a traditional technique, the qanât), Pierre Lombard, a researcher at the French CNRS, points out that this is not an artisanal and marginal process:

Until a few years ago, the importance of the ancestral technique of qanât was sometimes ignored in Central Asia, Iran, Syria, and even in the countries of the Arabian Peninsula. For example, the Public Authority for Water Resources of the Sultanate of Oman estimated in 1982 that all the qanâts still in operation conveyed more than 70 % of the total water used in that country and irrigated nearly 55% of the cereal lands. Oman was still one of the few states in the Middle East to maintain and sometimes even develop its qanât network; this situation, apart from its longevity, does not appear to be exceptional. If one turns to the edges of the Iranian Plateau, one can note with Wulff (1968) the obvious discrepancy between the relative aridity of this area (between 100 and 250 mm of annual precipitation) and its non-negligible agricultural production, and explain it by one of the densest networks of qanâts in the Middle East. It can also be recalled that until the construction of the Karaj dam in the early 1960s, the two million inhabitants of Tehran at that time consumed exclusively the water brought from the Elbourz foothills by several dozen regularly maintained qanâts. Finally, we can mention the case of some major oases in the Near and Middle East (Kharga in Egypt, Layla in Saudi Arabia, Al Ain in the United Arab Emirates, etc.) or in Central Asia (Turfan, in Chinese Turkestan) that owe their vast development, if not their very existence, to this remarkable technique.”

On the website ArchéOrient, the French archaeologist Rémy Boucharlat, Director of Research Emeritus at the CNRS, an Iran expert, explains:

“Whatever the origin of the water, deep or not, the technique of construction of the gallery is the same. First, the issue is to identify the presence of water, either its going underground near a river, or the presence of a water table under a foothill, which requires the science and experience of specialists. A motherwell will be dug to reach the top of the water table, indicating at which depth the [horizontal] gallery should be drilled. It’s slope must be very small, less than 2‰, so that the flow of water is calm and regular, and conduct the water gradually to the surface area, according to a gradient much lower than the slope of the foothill.

“The gallery is then dug, not starting from the mother well because it would be immediately flooded, but from downstream, from the point of arrival. The conduct is first dug in an open trench, then covered, and finally gradually sinks into the ground in a tunnel. For the evacuation of soil and ventilation during excavation, as well as to identify the direction of the gallery, shafts are dug from the surface at regular intervals, between 5 and 30 m depending on the nature of the land ».

Aireal view of persian qanât system.

In April 1973, Lyndon LaRouche’s friend, the French-Iranian professor and historian Aly Mazahéri (1914-1991), published his translation from Arab into French of “The Civilization of Hidden Waters”, a treatise on the exploitation of underground waters composed in the year 1017 by the Persian hydrologist Mohammed Al-Karaji, who lived in Baghdad. (Translated in English in 2011)

After an introduction and general considerations on geography, natural phenomena, the water cycle, the study of terrain and the instruments of the hydrologist, Al-Karaji gives a highly precise technical outline of the construction and maintenance of qanâts, as well as legal considerations respecting their management and maintenance.

Commentary on the qanâts in the treatise of Al-Karaji (11th century).

In his introduction to Al-Karji’s treatise, Professor Mazaheri emphasizes the role of the Iranian city of Merv (now in Turkmenistan). This ancient city, he says, was part of

“the long series of oases extending at the foot of the northern slope of the Iranian plateau, from the Caspian to the first foothills of the Pamirs. There, between the geological extension of the Caspian towards the East, there is a strip of arable land, more or less wide, but very fertile. Now, to exploit it, a lot of ingenuity is needed: where, for example in Merv, a big river, such as the Marghab, coming from the glaciers of the central East-Iranian massif, crosses the chain, it is necessary to establish dams, above the strip of arable land, without which, the ‘river’, divided into several dozens of arms, rushes under the sands. Elsewhere, and it is almost all along the northern slope of the chain, one can create artificial oases, by bringing the water by underground aqueducts.” (p. 44)

The construction of dams and underground aqueducts are among the most interesting legacies of their (the ancient Persians) irrigation techniques (…) Long before Islam, the Persian hydrologists had built thousands of aqueducts, allowing the creation of hundreds of villages, dozens of cities previously unknown. And very often, even where there was a river, because of the insufficiency of this one, the hydronomists had brought to light many aqueducts allowing the extension of the culture and the development of the city. Naishabur was such a city. Under the Sassanids, and later under the Caliphs, an important network of aqueducts had been created there, so that the inhabitants could afford the luxury of owning a ‘’bathing room’ in the basement, at the level of the aqueduct serving the house.”

Water room of a qanat in the basement of the Water Museum in Yadz, Iran.

Let us recall that most Persian scholars, including the famous mathematician Al-Khwarizmi, not suffering from today’s hyper-specialization that tends to curb creative thinking, excelled in mathematics, geometry, astronomy and medicine as well as in hydrology.

Mazaheri confirms that this “civilization of underground waters” spread well beyond the Iranian borders:

“Already, under the [Umayyad] Caliph Hisham (723-42), Persian hydronomists built aqueducts between Damascus and Mecca (…) Later, Mecca suffering from lack of water, Zubayda, the wife of Hâroun Al-Rachîd, sent Persian hydronomists there who endowed the city with a large underground aqueduct. And each time the latter was silted up, a new team left Persia to restore the network: such repairs took place periodically under Al-Muqtadir (908-32), under Al-Qa’im (1031-1075), under Al-Naçir (1180-1226) and, at the beginning of the fourteenth century, under the Mongol prince Emir Tchoban. We would say the same of Medina and the stages on the pilgrimage route, between Baghdad and Mecca, wherever it was possible to do so, hydronomic works were undertaken and ‘underground aqueducts’ were created.

Hydronomy is a highly demanding skill. To practice it, it is not enough to have mathematical knowledge: decadal calculus, algebra, trigonometry, etc., it is necessary to spend long hours in the galleries at the risk of dying by flooding, landslide or lack of air. It is necessary to have an ancestral instinct of ‘dowser’.”

The annual rainfall in Iran is 273 mm, which is less than one third of the world’s average annual precipitation.

The temporal and spatial distribution of precipitation is not uniform; about 75% occurs in a small area, mainly on the southern coast of the Caspian Sea, while the rest of the country does not receive sufficient rainfall. On the temporal scale, only 25% of the precipitation occurs during the plant growing season.

7,7 x the circonférence of the Earth

Still in use today in Iran, qanâts currently supply about 7.6 billion m3 of water, close to 15% of the country’s total water needs.

Considering that the average length of each qanât is 6 km in most parts of the country, the total length of the 30,000 qanât systems (potentially exploitable today) is about 310,800 km, which is about 7.7 times the circumference of the Earth or 6/7th of the Earth-Moon distance!

This shows the enormous amount of work and energy applied to build the qanâts. In fact, while more than 38,000 qanâts were in operation in Iran till 1966, its number dropped to 20,000 in 1998 and is currently estimated at 18,000. According to the Iranian daily Tehran Times, historically, over 120,000 qanat sites are documented.

Moreover, while in 1965, 30-50% of Iran’s total water needs were met by qanats, this figure has dropped to 15% in recent decades.

According to the Face Iran website:

The water flow of qanâts is estimated between 500 and 750 cubic meters per second. As land aridity tends to vary according to the abundance of rains in each region, this quantity of water is used as a more or less important supplement. This makes it possible to use good land that would otherwise be barren. The importance of the impact on the desert can be summarized in one figure: about 3 million hectares. In seven centuries of hard work, the Dutch conquered 1.5 million hectares from the marshes or the sea. In three millennia, the Iranians have conquered twice as much on the desert.

Indeed, to each new qanât corresponded a new village, new lands. From where a new human group absorbed the demographic surplus. Little by little the Iranian landscape was constituted. At the end of the qanat, is the house of the chief, often with one floor. It is surrounded by the villagers’ houses, animal shelters, gardens and market gardens.

The distribution of land and the days of irrigation of the plots were regulated by the chief of the villages. Thus, a qanat imposed a solidarity between the inhabitants.”

If each qanât is “invented” and supervised by a mirab (dowser-hydrologist and discoverer), the realization of a qanât is a collective task that requires several months or years, even for medium-sized qanâts, not to mention works of record dimensions (a 300 m deep mother-well, a 70 km long gallery classified in 2016 as a World Heritage Site by UNESCO, in northeast Iran).

Each undertaking is carried out by a village or a group of villages. The absolute necessity of a collective investment in the infrastructure and its maintenance requires a higher notion of the common good, an indispensable complement to the notion of private property that rains and rivers do not take in account.

In the Maghreb, the management of water distributed by a khettara (the local name for qanâts) follows traditional distribution norms called “water rights”. Originally, the volume of water granted per user was proportional to the work contributed to build the khettara, translated into an irrigation time during which the beneficiary had access to the entire flow of the khettara for his fields. Even today, when the khettara has not dried up, this rule of the right to water persists and a share can be sold or bought. Because it is also necessary to take into account the surface area of the fields to be irrigated by each family.

The causes of the decline of the qanâts are numerous. Without endorsing the catastrophist theses of an anti-human ecology, it must be noted that in the face of the increasing urban population, the random construction of dams and the digging of deep wells equipped with electric pumps have disturbed and often depleted the aquifers and water tables.

A neoliberal ideology, falsely described as “modern”, also prefers the individualistic “manager” of a well to a collective management organized among neighbors and villages. A passive State authority has done the rest. In the absence of more thoughtful reflection on its future, the age-old system of qanâts is on the verge of extinction as a result.

In the meantime, the Iranian population has grown from 40 to over 82 million in 40 years. Instead of living off oil, the country is seeking to prosper through agriculture and industry. As a result, the need for water has increased substantially. To cope with rising demands, Iran is desalinating sea water at great cost. Its civilian nuclear program will be the key factor to provide water at a reasonable cost.

Beyond political and religious divisions, closer cooperation between all the countries in the region (Turkey, Syria, Iraq, Israel, Egypt, Jordan, etc.) with a perspective to improve, develop, manage and share water resources, will be beneficial to each and all.

Presented as an “Oasis Plan” and promoted for decades by the American thinker and economist Lyndon LaRouche, such a policy, translating word into action, is the only basis of a true peace policy.

Bibliography :

  • Remy Boucharlat, The falaj or qanât, a polycentric and multi-period invention, ArcheOrient – Le Blog, September 2015 ;
  • Pierre Lombard, Du rythme naturel au rythme humain : vie et mort d’une technique traditionnelle, le qanat, Persée, 1991 ;
  • Aly Mazaheri, La civilisation des eaux cachées, un traité de l’exploitation des eaux souterraines composé en 1017 par l’hydrologue perse Mohammed Al-Karaji, Persée, 1973 ;
  • Hassan Ahmadi, Arash Malekian, Aliakbar Nazari Samani, The Qanat: A Living History in Iran, January 2010;
  • Evelyne Ferron, Egyptians, Persians and Romans: the interests and stakes of the development of Egyptian oasis environments.

NOTE:

[1] The ten cities forming the Decapolis were: 1) Damascus in Syria, much further north, sometimes considered an honorary member of the Decapolis; 2) Philadelphia (Amman in Jordan); 3) Rhaphana (Capitolias, Bayt Ras in Jordan); 4) Scythopolis (Baysan or Beit-Shean in Israel), which is said to be its capital; It is the only city west of the Jordan River; 5) Gadara (Umm Qeis in Jordan); 6) Hippos (Hippus or Sussita, in Israel); 7) Dion (Tell al-Ashari in Syria); 8) Pella (Tabaqat Fahil in Jordan); 9) Gerasa (Jerash in Jordan) and 10) Canatha (Qanawat in Syria)

Merci de partager !
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

Qanâts perses et Civilisation des eaux cachées

aqueduc souterrain
Journée internationale du lavage des mains, organisée par UNICEF.

Par Karel Vereycken, juillet 2021.

A une époque où d’anciennes maladies reviennent et où de nouvelles émergent à l’échelle mondiale, la vulnérabilité tragique d’une grande partie de l’humanité pose un immense défi.

On se demande s’il faut rire ou pleurer quand les autorités internationales claironnent sans plus de précisions que pour enrayer la pandémie de Covid-19, il « suffit » de bien se laver les mains à l’eau et au savon !

Ils oublient un petit détail : 3 milliards de personnes ne disposent pas d’installations pour se laver les mains chez elles et 1,4 milliard n’ont aucun accès, ni à l’eau, ni au savon !

Pourtant, depuis la nuit des temps, l’homme a su rendre l’eau disponible dans les endroits les plus reculés.

Voici un aperçu d’une merveille du génie humain, les qanâts perses, une technique de canalisations souterraines datant de l’âge de fer. Sans doute d’origine égyptienne, elle fut mise en œuvre à grande échelle en Perse à partir du début du 1er millénaire avant notre ère.

Le qanât ou aqueduc souterrain

Parfois appelé « forage horizontal », le qanât est un aqueduc souterrain servant à puiser dans une nappe phréatique pour l’acheminer par simple effet de gravitation vers des lieux d’habitation et de cultures. Le mot qanâts, vieux mot sémitique, probablement accadien, dérivé d’une racine qanat (roseau) d’où viennent canna et canal.

Cette « galerie drainante », taillée dans la roche ou construite par l’homme, est certainement l’une des inventions les plus ingénieuses pour l’irrigation dans les régions arides et semi-arides. La technique offre un avantage non négligeable : se déplaçant dans un conduit souterrain, pas une goutte d’eau ne se perd par évaporation.

Diffusion de la technique des qanâts perses dans le monde.

C’est cette technique qui permet à l’homme de créer des oasis en plein désert, lorsqu’une nappe phréatique est suffisamment proche de la surface du sol ou parfois sur le lit d’une rivière venant se perdre dans le désert.

Copiée et utilisée par les Romains, la technique des qanâts a été transportée par les Espagnols de l’autre côté de l’Atlantique vers le nouveau monde, où de nombreux canaux souterrains de ce type fonctionnent encore au Pérou et au Chili. En fait, il existe même des qanâts perses dans l’ouest du Mexique.

Si aujourd’hui, ce système triplement millénaire n’est pas forcément applicable partout pour résoudre les problèmes de pénurie d’eau dans les régions arides et semi-arides, il a de quoi nous inspirer en tant que démonstration du génie humain dans ce qu’il a de meilleur, c’est-à-dire capable de faire beaucoup avec peu.

Les oasis d’Égypte

Le génie de l’homme à l’œuvre : l’oasis de Dakhleh, en plein désert égyptien, alimenté par des qanâts.

Dès les balbutiements de la civilisation égyptienne, des techniques d’irrigation et de stockage de l’eau des crues du Nil furent développées afin de conserver cette eau limoneuse, riche en nutriments, pour l’utiliser tout au long de l’année. L’eau du fleuve était déviée et transportée par canaux vers les champs grâce à la gravité. Puisque l’eau du Nil ne parvenait pas dans les oasis, les Égyptiens utilisèrent l’eau jaillissante des sources, provenant des grandes réserves aquifères du désert de l’Ouest, et acheminée vers les terres par des canaux d’irrigation.

Le résultat de cette tentative de conquête du désert fut une habitation soutenue de l’oasis de Dakhleh tout au long de l’époque pharaonique, explicable non seulement par un intérêt commercial de la part de l’État égyptien, mais aussi par de nouvelles possibilités agricoles.

Aqueducs Romains

Avec ses 170 km, dont 106 en souterrain, le qanât de Gadara (actuellement en Jordanie) est le plus grand aqueduc de l’Antiquité. Il part d’une source d’eau de montagne retenue par un barrage (à droite) pour alimenter une série de villes à l’Est du Jourdain, en particulier Gadara, proche du lac Tibériade.
Le Qanât Fi’raun, ou aqueduc de Gadara, en Jordanie.

Plus proche de nous, le Qanât Fir’aun (Le cours d’eau du Pharaon) également connu comme l’aqueduc de Gadara, aujourd’hui en Jordanie.

En l’état actuel de nos connaissances, cet édifice de 170 kilomètres, qui alterne, en fonction de la géographie, plusieurs pont-aqueducs (du même type que celui du Gard en France) et 106 km de canaux souterrains utilisant la technique des qanâts perses.

Il est aussi le plus long aqueduc de l’Antiquité, et surtout le plus complexe et le fruit d’un long travail d’ingénierie hydraulique.

En réalité, les Romains ont achevé au IIe siècle un vieux projet visant à approvisionner en eau la Décapole, un ensemble de dix villes fondées par des colons grecs et macédoniens sous le roi séleucide Antiochos III (223 – 187 av. JC), un des successeurs d’Alexandre le Grand.

La Décapole était un groupe de dix villes [*] situées à la frontière orientale de l’Empire romain (aujourd’hui en Syrie, en Jordanie et en Israël), regroupées en raison de leur langue, de leur culture, de leur emplacement et de leur statut politique, chacune possédant un certain degré d’autonomie et d’autogestion.

Sa capitale, Gadara, abritait plus de 50 000 personnes et se distinguait par son atmosphère cosmopolite, sa propre université avec des érudits, attirant écrivains, artistes, philosophes et poètes.

Mais il manquait quelque chose à cette ville riche : une abondance d’eau.

Entrée du qanât à Gadara, Jordanie.

Le qanât de Gadara a changé tout cela. « Rien que dans la capitale, il y avait des milliers de fontaines, d’abreuvoirs et de thermes. Les riches sénateurs se rafraîchissaient dans des piscines privées et décoraient leurs jardins de grottes rafraîchissantes. Il en résultait une consommation quotidienne record de plus de 500 litres d’eau par habitant », explique Matthias Schulz, auteur d’un reportage sur l’aqueduc dans Spiegel Online.

La Perse

Le Jardin de Shahzadeh en Iran, un oasis construit grâce à la technique millénaire des qanâts.

Travaux de maintenance d’un qanât.

La technique des qanâts, reprise et mise en œuvre par les Romains, leur était parvenue de Perse.

En effet, c’est sous L’Empire des Achéménides (vers 559 – 330 av. JC.), que cette technique se serait répandue lentement depuis la Perse vers l’est et l’ouest.

On trouve ainsi de nombreux qanâts en Afrique du Nord (Maroc, Algérie, Libye), au Moyen-Orient (Iran, Oman, Irak) et plus à l’est, en Asie centrale, de l’Afghanistan jusqu’en Chine (Xinjiang) en passant par l’Inde.

Ces galeries drainantes ou galeries de captage émergentes sont attestées dans différentes régions du monde sous des noms divers : qanât et kareez en Iran, Syrie et Égypte, kariz, kehriz au Pakistan et en Afghanistan, aflaj à Oman, galeria en Espagne, kahn au Baloutchistan, kanerjing en Chine, foggara en Afrique du Nord, khettara au Maroc, ngruttati en Sicile, etc.).

Historiquement, la majorité des populations d’Iran et d’autres régions arides d’Asie ou d’Afrique du Nord dépendait de l’eau fournie par les qanâts ; les espaces de peuplement correspondaient ainsi aux lieux où leur construction était possible.

Dans son article « Du rythme naturel au rythme humain : vie et mort d’une technique traditionnelle, le qanât », Pierre Lombard, chercheur au CNRS, relève qu’il ne s’agit pas d’un procédé artisanal et marginal :

La technique ancestrale du qanât revêtait il y a quelques années encore une importance parfois méconnue en Asie centrale, en Iran, en Syrie, ou encore dans les pays de la péninsule arabique. A titre d’exemple, la Public Authority for Water Ressources du Sultanat d’Oman estimait en 1982 que l’ensemble des qanâts encore en activité convoyaient plus de 70 % du total de l’eau utilisée dans ce pays et irriguaient près de 55 % des terres à céréales. L’Oman demeurait certes alors l’un des rares Etats du Moyen-Orient à entretenir et parfois même développer son réseau de qanâts ; cette situation, hormis sa longévité, n’apparaît pourtant en rien exceptionnelle. Si l’on se tourne vers les bordures du Plateau iranien, on peut constater avec Wulff (1968) le décalage évident entre la relative aridité de cette zone (entre 100 et 250 mm de précipitations annuelles) et ses productions agricoles non négligeables, et l’expliquer par l’un des plus denses réseaux de qanâts du Moyen-Orient. On peut aussi rappeler que jusqu’à la construction du barrage du Karaj au début des années 60, les deux millions d’habitants que comptait alors Téhéran consommaient exclusivement l’eau apportée depuis le piémont de l’Elbourz par plusieurs dizaines de qanâts régulièrement entretenus. On peut enfin évoquer le cas de quelques oasis majeures du Proche et Moyen-Orient (Kharga en Egypte, Layla en Arabie saoudite, Al Ain aux Émirats arabes unis, etc.) ou d’Asie centrale (Turfan, dans le Turkestan chinois,) qui doivent leur vaste développement, sinon leur existence même à cette technique remarquable.

Sur le site ArchéOrient, l’archéologue Rémy Boucharlat, directeur de Recherche émérite au CNRS, spécialiste de l’Iran, explique :

Quelle que soit l’origine de l’eau, profonde ou non, la technique de construction de la galerie est la même. Il s’agit d’abord de repérer la présence de l’eau, soit son sous-écoulement à proximité d’un cours d’eau, soit la présence d’une nappe plus profonde sur un piémont, ce qui nécessite la science et l’expérience de spécialistes. Un puits-mère atteint la partie supérieure de cette couche ou nappe d’eau, qui indique à quelle profondeur devra être creusée la galerie. La pente de celle-ci doit être très faible, moins de 2‰, afin que l’écoulement de l’eau soit calme et régulier, et pour conduire peu à peu l’eau vers la surface, selon un gradient bien inférieur à la pente du piémont.

La galerie est ensuite creusée, non pas depuis le puits-mère car elle serait immédiatement inondée, mais depuis l’aval, à partir du point d’arrivée. Le conduit est d’abord creusé en tranchée ouverte, puis couverte, pour enfin s’enfoncer peu à peu dans le sol en tunnel. Pour l’évacuation des terres et la ventilation pendant le creusement, ainsi que pour repérer la direction de la galerie, des puits sont creusés depuis la surface à intervalles réguliers, entre 5 et 30 m selon la nature du terrain.

Qanâts iraniens, vue du ciel sur les puits d’aération et de service.

En avril 1973, notre ami, le professeur et historien franco-iranien Aly Mazahéri (1914-1991), publia sa traduction de La civilisation des eaux cachées, un traité de l’exploitation des eaux souterraines composé en 1017 par l’hydrologue perse Mohammed Al-Karaji, qui vécut à Bagdad.

Après une introduction et des considérations générales sur la géographie du globe, les phénomènes naturels, le cycle de l’eau, l’étude des terrains et les instruments de l’hydronome, Al-Karaji donne une description technique de la construction et de l’entretien des qanâts, ainsi que des considérations juridiques sur la gestion des puits et des conduites.

Dans son introduction au traité d’Al-Karji, le professeur Aly Mazahéri souligne le rôle de la ville iranienne de Merv (aujourd’hui au Turkménistan).

Cette ville antique faisait partie de

la longue série d’oasis s’étendant au pied du versant nord du plateau iranien, de la Caspienne aux premiers contreforts des Pamirs. Là, entre l’extension géologique de la Caspienne vers l’Est, se trouve une bande de terre arable, plus ou moins large, mais fort riche. Or, pour l’exploiter, il faut énormément d’ingéniosité : là où, par exemple à Merv, un grand cours d’eau, tel le Marghab, issu des glaciers du massif central est-iranien, franchit la chaîne, il faut établir des barrages, au-dessus de la bande de terre arable, sans quoi, le ’fleuve’ divisé en plusieurs dizaines de bras se précipite sous les sables. Ailleurs, et c’est presque tout au long du versant nord de la chaîne, on peut créer des oasis artificielles, en amenant l’eau par des aqueducs souterrains. (p. 44)

Commentaire sur les qanâts dans le traité d’Al-Karaji (XIe siècle).

La construction de barrages et celle d’aqueducs souterrains sont parmi les legs les plus intéressants de leurs techniques d’irrigation (…) Bien avant l’islam, les hydronomes perses avaient construit des milliers d’aqueducs, permettant la création de centaines de villages, de dizaines de villes auparavant inconnues. Et très souvent, là même où il y avait une rivière, en raison de l’insuffisance de celle-ci, les hydronomes avaient mis au jour nombre d’aqueducs permettant l’extension de la culture et le développement de la ville. Naishabur était une ville de ce genre. Sous les Sassanides, puis sous les califes, un important réseau d’aqueducs y avait été créé, de sorte que les habitants pouvaient s’offrir le luxe de posséder chacun une ‘salle d’eau’ au sous-sol, au niveau de l’aqueduc desservant la maison.

Salle d’eau d’un qanât au sous-sol du Musée de l’eau à Yadz, Iran.

Rappelons que la plupart des savants perses, notamment le fameux mathématicien Al-Khwarizmi, ne souffrant pas de l’hyper spécialisation qui tend à brider la pensée créatrice, excellaient aussi bien en mathématique, en géométrie, en astronomie et en médecine qu’en hydrologie.

Mazaheri confirme que cette « civilisation des eaux souterraines » s’est répandue bien au-delà des frontières iraniennes :

Déjà, sous le calife Hisham (723-42), des hydronomes persans construisirent entre Damas et La Mecque des aqueducs (…) Plus tard, La Mecque souffrant du manque d’eau, Zubayda, l’épouse de Hâroun Al-Rachîd, y envoya des hydronomes persans qui dotèrent la ville d’un grand aqueduc souterrain. Et chaque fois que celui-ci venait à être ensablé, une nouvelle équipe partait de Perse pour y restaurer le réseau : de telles réfections eurent lieu périodiquement sous Al-Muqtadir (908-32), sous Al-Qa’im (1031-1075), sous Al-Naçir (1180-1226) et, au début du XIVe siècle, sous le prince mongol l’émir Tchoban. Nous dirions autant de Médine et des étapes sur la route du pèlerinage, entre Bagdad et La Mecque, partout où il était possible de le faire, des travaux hydronomiques furent entrepris et des ‘aqueducs souterrains’ furent créés.

« L’hydronomie est un art pénible. Il ne suffisait pas, pour l’exercer, de posséder des connaissances mathématiques : calcul décadique, algèbre, trigonométrie, etc., il fallait passer de longues heures dans les galeries au risque d’y mourir par inondation, éboulement ou manque d’air. Il fallait posséder un instinct ancestral de ‘sourcier’. 

Les précipitations annuelles en Iran sont de 273 mm, soit moins d’un tiers des précipitations annuelles moyennes mondiales.

La distribution temporelle et spatiale des précipitations n’est pas uniforme ; environ 75 % concernent une petite zone, principalement sur la côte sud de la mer Caspienne, alors que le reste du pays ne reçoit pas de précipitations suffisantes. À l’échelle temporelle, seulement 25 % des précipitations ont lieu pendant la saison de croissance des plantes.

Les qanâts iraniens : 7,7 x la circonférence de la Terre

Toujours utilisés aujourd’hui, les qanâts sont construits comme une série de tunnels souterrains et de puits qui amènent les eaux souterraines à la surface. Aujourd’hui, en Iran, ils fournissent environ 7,6 milliards de m3, soit 15 % du total des besoins en eau du pays.

Si l’on considère que la longueur moyenne de chaque qanât est de 6 km dans la plupart des régions du pays, la longueur totale des 30 000 systèmes de qanât (potentiellement exploitables aujourd’hui) est d’environ 310 800 km, soit environ 7,7 fois la circonférence de la Terre ou 6/7 de la distance Terre-Lune !

Cela montre l’énorme travail et l’énergie utilisés pour la construction des qanâts. En fait, alors que plus de 38 000 qanats étaient en activité en Iran jusqu’en 1966, ce nombre est tombé à 20 000 en 1998 et est actuellement estimé à 18 000. Selon le quotidien iranien Tehran Times, plus de 120 000 sites de qanâts sont documentés.

De plus, alors qu’en 1965, 30 à 50 % des besoins totaux en eau de l’Iran étaient couverts par les qanâts, ce chiffre est tombé à 15 % au cours des dernières décennies.

Comme le précise le site Face Iran :

Le débit des qanâts est estimé entre 500 et 750 mètres-cubes seconde. Comme l’aridité n’est pas totale, cette quantité sert d’appoint plus ou moins important suivant l’abondance des pluies de chaque région. Ceci permet d’utiliser de bonnes terres qui seraient autrement stériles. L’importance de l’emiètement ainsi réalisé sur le désert se résume en un chiffre : environ 3 millions d’hectares. En sept siècles de travail acharné, les Hollandais conquirent sur les marais ou sur la mer 1,5 million d’hectares. En trois millénaires, les Iraniens ont conquis le double sur le désert.

En effet, à chaque nouveau qanât correspondait un nouveau village, de nouvelles terres. D’où un nouveau groupe humain absorbait les excédents démographiques. Peu à peu se constituait le paysage iranien. Au débouché du qanât, se trouve la maison du chef, souvent à un étage. Elle est entouré des maisons des villageois, des abris des animaux, de jardins et de cultures maraichères.

La distribution des terrains et les jours d’irrigation des parcelles étaient réglés par le chef des villages. Ainsi un qanât imposait une solidarité entre les habitants.

Si chaque qanât est conçu et surveillé par un mirab (sourcier-hydrologue et découvreur), réaliser un qanât est un travail collectif qui demande plusieurs mois ou années, même pour les qanâts de dimensions moyennes, sans même parler des ouvrages aux dimensions records (puits-mère de 300 m de profondeur, galerie longue de 70 km classée en 2016 au Patrimoine mondial de l’humanité par l’UNESCO, dans le nord-est de l’Iran).

L’entreprise est réalisée par un village ou un groupe de villages. La nécessité absolue d’un investissement collectif dans l’infrastructure et sa maintenance nécessite une notion supérieure du bien commun, complément indispensable à la notion de propriété privée que les pluies et les fleuves n’ont guère l’habitude de respecter.

Au Maghreb, la gestion des eaux distribuées par une khettara (nom local des qanâts) obéit à des normes traditionnelles de répartition appelées « droit d’eau ». À l’origine, le volume d’eau octroyé par usager était proportionnel aux travaux fournis lors de l’édification de la khettara et se traduisait en un temps d’irrigation durant lequel le bénéficiaire disposait de l’ensemble du débit de la khettara pour ses champs. Encore aujourd’hui, lorsque la khettara n’est pas tarie, cette règle du droit d’eau perdure et une part peut se vendre ou s’acheter. Car il faut aussi prendre en compte la superficie des champs à irriguer de chaque famille.

Le déclin

Les causes du déclin des qanâts sont multiples. Sans endosser les thèses catastrophistes d’une écologie anti-humaine, force est de constater que face à l’augmentation de la population urbaine, la construction irréfléchie de barrages et le creusement de puits profonds équipés de pompes électriques, ont perturbé et souvent épuisé les nappes phréatiques.

Une idéologie néolibérale, faussement qualifiée de « moderne », préfère également le « manager » d’un puits à une gestion collective entre voisins et villages. Un Etat absent a fait le reste. Faute d’une réflexion plus réfléchie sur son avenir, le système millénaire des qanâts est en voie de disparition.

Entretemps, la population iranienne est passé de 40 à plus de 82 millions d’habitants en 40 ans. Au lieu de vivre de la rente pétrolière, le pays cherche à prospérer grâce à son agriculture et son industrie. Du coup, les besoins en eau explosent. Pour y faire face, l’Iran procède au dessalement de l’eau de mer. Son programme nucléaire civil sera la clé pour en réduire le coût.

Au-delà des divisions politiques et religieuses, une coopération resserrée entre tous les pays de la région (Turquie, Syrie, Irak, Israël, Egypte, Jordanie, etc.) en vue de l’amélioration, du partage et de la gestion des ressources hydriques, sera forcément bénéfique à chacun.

Présentée comme un « Plan Oasis » et promue depuis des décennies par le penseur et économiste américain Lyndon LaRouche, une telle politique, bien mieux que milles traités et autant de paroles, est la base même d’une véritable politique de paix.

Sites de qanâts en Syrie

Bibliographie :


[*] Les dix villes formant la Décapole étaient : 1) Damas en Syrie, bien plus au nord, parfois considérée comme un membre honorifique de la Décapole ; 2) Philadelphia (Amman en Jordanie) ; 3) Rhaphana (Capitolias, Bayt Ras en Jordanie) ; 4) Scythopolis (Baysan ou Beït-Shéan en Israël), qui en serait la capitale ; c’est la seule ville à se trouver à l’ouest du Jourdain ; 5) Gadara (Umm Qeis en Jordanie) ; 6) Hippos (Hippus ou Sussita, en Israël) ; 7) Dion (Tell al-Ashari en Syrie) ; 8) Pella (Tabaqat Fahil en Jordanie) ; 9) Gerasa (Jerash en Jordanie) et 10) Canatha (Qanawat en Syrie).

Merci de partager !
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

La Route de la soie maritime, une histoire de mille et une coopérations

Reconstruction à l’identique d’un des navires figurant sur les bas-reliefs du temple bouddhiste de Bonobudur datant du VIIIe siècle en Indonésie.

Il est de bon ton aujourd’hui de présenter les enjeux maritimes dans le cadre d’une l’idéologie géopolitique britannique moribonde dressant les pays et les peuples les uns contre les autres.

Cependant, comme le démontre cette brève histoire de la Route de la soie maritime, tirée pour l’essentiel d’un document de l’organisation internationale du tourisme, l’océan a été avant tout un lieu fantastique de rencontres fertiles, de brassages culturels et de coopérations mutuellement bénéfiques.

Les anciens Chinois ont inventé beaucoup de choses que nous utilisons de nos jours, notamment le papier, les allumettes, les brouettes, la poudre à canon, la noria (élévateur), les écluses à sas, le cadran solaire, l’astronomie, la porcelaine, la peinture laque, la roue de potier, les feux d’artifice, la monnaie de papier, la boussole, le gouvernail d’étambot, le tangram, le sismographe, les dominos, la corde à sauter, les cerfs-volants, la cérémonie du thé, le parapluie pliable, l’encre, la calligraphie, le harnais pour animaux, les jeux de cartes, l’impression, le boulier, le papier peint, l’arbalète, la crème glacée, et surtout la soie dont nous aller parler ici.

Soie chinoise.

Origine de la soie

Avant de parler des « routes » de la soie, deux mots sur les origines de la sériciculture, c’est-à-dire l’élevage de vers à soie.

Comme le confirment des découvertes archéologiques récentes, la production de la soie représente un savoir-faire ancestral. La présence du mûrier pour l’élevage du ver à soie a été constatée en Chine autour du fleuve jaune chez la culture de Yangshao lors du néolithique moyen chinois de 4500 à 3000 av. JC.

En général, on préfère retenir la légende qui affirme que la soie a été découverte vers 2500 ans avant J.C., par la princesse chinoise Si Ling-chi, lorsqu’un cocon tomba accidentellement dans son bol de thé. En essayant de le retirer, elle s’aperçut que le cocon ramolli par l’eau chaude déployait un fil délicat, doux et solide pouvant être dévidé et assemblé. Ainsi serait née l’idée de confectionner des étoffes. La princesse décida alors de planter de nombreux mûriers blancs dans son jardin pour élever des vers à soie.

Cycle de reproduction du ver à soie.

Les vers à soie (ou bombyx) et les mûriers furent divinement bien soignés par la princesse (les vers à soie se nourrissent uniquement de feuilles de mûriers blancs).

La production de soie est un processus long qui nécessite une grande surveillance. Les papillons de soie pondent environs 500 œufs au cours de leurs vies, qui est de 4 à 6 jours. Après éclosion des œufs, les bébés vers se nourrissent de feuilles de mûrier dans un environnement contrôlé. Ils ont un féroce appétit et leur poids peut considérablement augmenter. Après avoir emmagasiné suffisamment d’énergie, les vers sécrètent par leurs glandes de la soie une gelée blanche et s’en servent pour réaliser un cocon autour d’eux.

Après huit ou neuf jours, les vers sont tués et les cocons sont plongés dans de l’eau bouillante afin d’assouplir les filaments de protection qui sont enroulés sur une bobine. Ces filaments peuvent être de 600 à 900 mètres de long. Plusieurs filaments sont assemblés pour former un fil. Les fils de soie sont alors tissé pour former une toile ou utilisée pour de la broderie fine ou encore le brocart, riche tissu de soie rehaussé de dessins brochés en fils d’or et d’argent.

Le début du commerce de la soie

Sous la menace de la peine capitale, la sériciculture resta un secret bien gardé et la Chine conservera durant des millénaires son monopole sur la fabrication.

Ce n’est que sous la dynastie des Zhou (1112 av. JC.), qu’une Route de la soie maritime va desservir à partir de la Chine le Japon et la Corée car le gouvernement décide d’y envoyer, depuis le port situé dans la baie de Bohai (de la Péninsule de Shandong), des Chinois chargés de former les habitants à la sériciculture et l’agriculture. C’est ainsi que les techniques d’élevage du vers à soie, du bobinage et du tissage de la soie ont, peu à peu, été introduites en Corée via la mer Jaune.

Lorsque l’empereur Qin Shi Huang unifie la Chine (221 av. JC.), de nombreuses personnes des États de Qi, Yan et Zhao s’enfuient vers la Corée en emportant, avec eux, des vers à soie et leur technique d’élevage. Ceci va accélérer le développement de la filature de la soie dans ce pays.

Pour les relations internationales de la Chine, la Corée a joué un rôle central en particulier comme un pont intellectuel entre la Chine et le Japon. Son commerce avec la Chine a également permis la divulgation du bouddhisme et des méthodes de fabrication de la porcelaine.

Bien qu’initialement réservé à la Cour impériale, la soie s’est répandu à travers toute la culture asiatique, aussi bien géographiquement que socialement. La soie devient rapidement le tissu de luxe par excellence que la terre entière désire.

A l’époque des dynasties Han (206 av. JC à 220), un canevas dense de routes commerciales fait exploser les échanges culturels et commerciaux à travers l’Asie centrale et impacte profondément la dynamique civilisationnelle. La dynastie des Han continue la construction de la grande muraille et crée notamment la commanderie de Dunhuang (Gansu), poste clé de la Route de la soie. Son commerce s’étend, plus de deux siècles av. JC, jusqu’à la Grèce puis Rome où la soie est réservée aux élites.

Au IIIe siècle, l’Inde, le Japon et la Perse (Iran) réussissent à percer le secret de la fabrication de la soie et deviennent d’importants producteurs.

La soie arrive en Europe

L’élevage du ver à soie, dit-on, aurait débuté en Europe au VIe siècle grâce à deux moines du Mont Athos, envoyés par l’empereur byzantin Justinien. Ils ont rapporté de Chine ou d’Inde, des œufs de vers à soie cachés dans leur bâton de pèlerin en bambou creux. Une autre version prétend que ce serait l’empereur Han Wu (IIe siècle) qui envoya des ambassadeurs, munis de présents tel que la soie, vers l’occident. L’élevage se répandit d’abord dans l’empire byzantin qui en conserva le secret.

Au VIIe siècle, la sériciculture se répand en Afrique et en Sicile où, sous l’impulsion de Roger Ier de Sicile (v. 1034-1101) et de son fils Roger II (1093-1154), le ver à soie et le mûrier furent introduits dans l’ancien Péloponnèse.

Au Xe siècle, l’Andalousie devient l’épicentre de la fabrication de la soie avec Grenade, Tolède et Séville. Lors de la conquête arabe, la sériciculture passa en Espagne, en Italie (Venise, Florence et Milan) et en France.

Les plus anciennes traces françaises d’une activité séricicole remontent au XIIIe siècle, notamment dans le Gard (1234) et à Paris (1290).

Au XVe siècle, face à l’importation ruineuse de la soie (brute ou manufacturée) italiennes, Louis XI essaye de créer des manufactures de soieries, d’abord à Tours sur la Loire, en ensuite à Lyon, une ville au carrefour des routes nord-sud où les émigrants italiens pratiquaient déjà le commerce de soieries.

Au XIXe siècle, la production de la soie a été industrialisée au Japon mais au XXe siècle, la Chine reprend sa place comme le plus grand producteur mondial. Aujourd’hui, l’Inde, le Japon, la République de Corée, la Thaïlande, le Vietnam, l’Ouzbékistan et le Brésil ont des grosses capacités de production.

Brassage culturel

Autant que la soie elle-même, le transport de la soie par voie maritime remonte à des âges immémoriaux.

Pour les Chinois, il existe deux principales routes : la Route de la Soie de la Mer orientale de Chine (vers la Corée et le Japon) et la Route de la Soie de la Mer méridionale de Chine (via le détroit de Malacca vers l’Inde, le golfe Persique, l’Afrique et l’Europe). Royaume du Fou-Nan

Au Vietnam, le musée de Hanoï possède une pièce de monnaie datant de l’an 152 arborant l’effigie de l’empereur romain Antonin le Pieux. Cette pièce a été découverte dans les vestiges d’Oc Eo, une ville vietnamienne située au sud du delta du Mékong, qu’on pense avoir été le port principal du Royaume du Fou-nan (Ier au IXe siècle).

Ce royaume, qui couvrait le territoire du Cambodge actuel et de la région administrative vietnamienne du delta du Mékong, a prospéré du Ier au IXe siècle. Or, la première mention du royaume du Fou-nan, apparait dans le compte rendu d’une mission chinoise qui s’y est rendue au IIIe siècle.

Les Founamiens furent à la gloire de leur puissance lorsque l’hindouisme et le bouddhisme furent introduits en Asie du Sud-Est.

Ensuite, à partir de l’Egypte, des marchands grecs ont atteint la baie de Bengale. Des quantités considérables de poivre atteignent alors Ostia, le port d’entrée de Rome. Toutes les preuves historiques démontrent que le commerce est-ouest fleurissait dès notre premier millénaire.

Perses et Arabes en Asie

Empire des Sassanides.

Du coté occidental, à l’entrée de la baie de Koweït, à 20 kilomètres au large de la ville de Koweït City, non loin du débouché de l’estuaire commun du Tigre et de l’Euphrate dans le golfe Persique, l’île de Failaka a été l’un des lieux de rendez-vous où la Grèce, Rome et la Chine échangeaient leurs marchandises.

Sous la dynastie des Sassanides (226-651), les Perses ont développé leurs routes commerciales jusqu’en Asie du Sud-est en passant par l’Inde et le Sri Lanka. Cette infrastructure commerciale fut reprise ensuite par les Arabes lorsqu’en 762 ils déplacèrent la capitale Omeyyade de Damas à Bagdad.

Les présidents chinois et indien, Xi Jinping et Narendra Modi, explorant le fonctionnement de la roue à tisser, fruit des échanges entre Arabes, Indiens et Chinois.
Dhow arabe.

Ainsi, la ville de Quilon (Kollam), la capitale du Kerala en Inde, voit cohabiter dès le IXe siècle des colonies de marchands arabes, chrétiens, juifs et chinois.

Du coté occidental, les navigateurs perses et ensuite arabes ont joué un rôle central dans la naissance de la route de la soie maritime. A la suite des routes sassanides, les Arabes poussaient leurs dhows, c’est-à-dire les boutres ou voiliers arabes traditionnels, de la mer Rouge aux côtes chinoises et jusqu’aux confins de la Malaisie et de l’Indonésie.

Ces marins apportèrent avec eux une nouvelle religion, l’islam qui s’étendra en Asie du Sud-Est. Si initialement le pèlerinage traditionnel (le hajj) vers la Mecque ne fut qu’une aspiration pour de nombreux musulmans, il leur deviendra de plus en plus possible de l’effectuer.

Lors de la mousson, la saison où les vents sont favorables à la navigation vers l’Inde dans l’océan Indien, les missions commerciales semestrielles se transformaient en véritables foires internationales offrant du même coup une occasion pour transporter par la mer une grande quantité de marchandises dans des conditions (abstraction faite des pirates et de l’imprévisibilité du temps) relativement moins exposées aux dangers du transport par voie terrestre.

Chine : la Route de la soie maritime
sous les dynasties Sui, Tang et Song

Le pont de Luoyang, un chef-d’œuvre d’architecture ancienne à Quanzhou.

C’est sous la dynastie Sui (581-618), qu’en partance de Quanzhou, ville côtière dans la province du Fujian, dans le sud-est de la Chine, la Route de la soie maritime trace ses premiers itinéraires commerciaux.

Riche de sa panoplie d’endroits pittoresques et de sites historiques, Quanzhou a été proclamée « point de départ de la Route de la Soie maritime » par l’UNESCO.

C’est à cette époque que les premières méthodes d’imprimerie font leur apparition en Chine. Il s’agit de blocs de bois permettant d’imprimer sur du textile. En 593, l’Empereur Sui, Wen-ti, ordonna l’impression des images et des écrits bouddhiques. Un des plus anciens textes imprimés est un écrit bouddhiste datant de 868 retrouvé dans une grotte près de Dunhuang, une ville étape de la Route de la soie.

Sous la dynastie Tang (618-907), l’expansion militaire du Royaume apporta de la sécurité, du commerce et des idées nouvelles. Le fait que la stabilité de la Chine des Tang coïncide avec celle de la Perse des Sassanides, permet alors aux routes de la soie terrestres et maritimes de prospérer. La grande transformation de la route de la soie maritime aura lieu à partir du VIIe siècle lorsque la Chine s’ouvre de plus en plus aux échanges internationaux.
Le premier ambassadeur arabe y prend ses fonctions en 651.

Fresque murale exécuté en 706, du tombeau de l’Empereur Tang, avec des émissaires diplomatiques à la Cour impériale. Les deux figures à droite, soigneusement habillés, y représentent la Corée, celui au milieu, (un moine ?) sans couvre-chef et avec « un gros nez » l’Occident.

La Dynastie Tang choisit comme capitale la ville de Chang’an (appelé aujourd’hui Xi’an). Elle adopte une attitude ouverte vis-à-vis des différentes croyances. Des temples bouddhistes, taoïstes et confucéens y coexistent pacifiquement avec des mosquées, des synagogues et des églises nestoriennes chrétiennes.

Chang’an étant le terminus de la Route de la Soie, le marché ouest de Chang’an devient le centre du commerce mondial. Selon le registre de l’Autorité Six des Tang, plus de 300 nations et régions avaient des relations commerciales avec Chang’an.

Presque 10 000 familles de pays étrangers de l’ouest vivaient dans la ville, spécialement dans la zone autour du marché ouest. Il y avait beaucoup d’auberges étrangères dont le personnel était des servantes étrangères choisies pour leur beauté. Le poète le plus célèbre dans l’histoire Chinoise, Li Bai, flânait souvent parmi elles. La nourriture étrangère, les costumes, la musique étaient la mode de Chang’an.

Après la chute de la dynastie Tang, les Cinq dynasties et la période des dix royaumes (907-960), l’arrivée de la dynastie Song (960-1279) va inaugurer une nouvelle période faste caractérisée par une centralisation accrue et un renouveau économique et culturel. La route maritime de la soie retrouve alors de son allant. En 1168 une synagogue est érigée à Kaifeng, capitale de la dynastie Song du Sud, pour servir aux marchands de la route de la soie.

Durant la même période, de pair avec l’expansion de l’islam, des comptoirs commerciaux vont apparaître tout autour de l’océan Indien et dans le reste de l’Asie du Sud-est.

La Chine incite alors ses marchands à saisir les occasions qu’offre le trafic maritime, notamment la vente du camphre, une plante médicinale très recherchée. Un véritable réseau commercial se développe alors dans les Indes orientales sous les auspices du Royaume de Sriwijaya, une cité-Etat du sud de Sumatra en Indonésie (voir ci-dessous) qui fera pendant près de six siècles la jonction entre d’un coté les marchands chinois et de l’autre les Indiens et les Malais. Une route commerciale émerge alors réellement méritant le nom de « route de la soie » maritime.

Des quantités de plus en plus importantes d’épices passent alors par l’Inde, la mer Rouge et Alexandrie en Egypte avant d’atteindre les marchands de Gênes, Venise et les autres ports occidentaux. De là, ils repartiront vers les marchés du nord de l’Europe de Lübeck (Allemagne), Riga (Lituanie) ou encore Tallinn (Estonie), qui deviendront, à partir du XIIe siècle, des villes importantes de la Ligue hanséatique.

Après sept années de fouilles, plus de 60 000 objets en porcelaine datant de la Dynastie Song (960-1279) ont été découverts sur le navire Nanhai (mer de Chine méridionale) qui était resté sous l’eau depuis plus de 800 ans.
Jonque du XVe siècle de la dynastie Ming.

En Chine, sous le règne de l’empereur Song, Renzong (1022-1063), beaucoup d’argent et d’énergie furent dépensés pour réunir les savoirs et les savoir-faire. L’économie fut la première à en bénéficier.

En s’appuyant sur le savoir-faire des marins arabes et indiens, les navires chinois deviennent alors les plus avancés du monde.

Les Chinois, qui avaient inventé la boussole (au moins depuis l’an 1119), dépassèrent rapidement leurs concurrents au niveau de la cartographie et l’art de naviguer alors que la jonque chinoise devient le vraquier par excellence.

Dans son traité géographique, Zhou Qufei, en 1178, rapporte :

« Les gros navires qui croisent la Mer du sud sont comme des maisons. Lorsqu’ils déplient leurs voiles, on dirait d’énormes nuages. Leur gouvernail est long de plusieurs dizaines de pieds. Un seul navire peut abriter plusieurs centaines d’hommes. A bord, il y a de quoi manger pour un an ».

Des fouilles archéologiques confirment cette réalité comme par exemple l’épave d’une jonque datant du XIVe siècle, retrouvée aux larges de la Corée, dans laquelle on a découvert plus de 10 000 pièces de céramique.

Lors de cette période, le commerce côtier passe graduellement des mains des marchands arabes aux mains des marchands chinois. Le commerce s’étend, notamment grâce à l’inclusion de la Corée ainsi que l’intégration du Japon, de la côte indienne de Malabar, du golfe Persique et de la mer Rouge dans les réseaux commerciaux existants.

La Chine exporte du thé, de la soie, du coton, de la porcelaine, des laques, du cuivre, des colorants, des livres et du papier. En retour, elle importe des produits de luxe et des matières premières, notamment des bois rares, des métaux précieux, des pierres précieuses et semi-précieuses, des épices et de l’ivoire.

Des pièces de monnaie en cuivre de la période Song ont été découvertes au Sri Lanka, et la présence de la porcelaine de cette époque a été constatée en Afrique de l’Est, en Egypte, en Turquie, dans certains Etats du Golfe et en Iran, tout comme en Inde et en Asie du Sud-est.

L’importance de la Corée et du Royaume de Silla

Pendant le premier millénaire, la culture et la philosophie ont fleuri dans la péninsule Coréenne. Un réseau marchand bien organisé et bien protégé avec la Chine et le Japon y opérait.

Sur l’île japonaise d’Okino-shima on trouve de nombreuses traces historiques témoignant des échanges intenses entre l’archipel japonais, la Corée et le continent asiatique.

Des fouilles effectuées dans des tombeaux anciens à Gyeongju, aujourd’hui une ville sud-coréenne de 264 000 habitants et capitale de l’ancien Royaume de Silla (de 57 av. JC à 935) qui contrôlait la plus grande partie de la péninsule du VIIe au IXe siècle, démontrent l’intensité des échanges de ce royaume avec le reste du monde, via la route de la soie.

L’Indonésie, une grande puissance maritime au coeur de la Route de la soie maritime

En Indonésie, en Malaisie et dans le sud de la Thaïlande, le Royaume de Sriwijaya (VIIe au XIIIe) a joué le rôle majeur de comptoir maritime où furent entreposées des marchandises de forte valeur de la région et au-delà en vue de leur commercialisation ultérieure par voie maritime. Sriwijaya contrôlait notamment le détroit de Malacca, le passage maritime incontournable entre l’Inde et la Chine.

A l’apogée de sa puissance au XIe siècle, le réseau des ports et des comptoirs sous domination Sriwijaya échangèrent une vaste palette de produits et de productions : du riz, du coton, de l’indigo et de l’argent de Java, de l’aloès (une plante succulente d’origine africaine), des résines végétales, du camphre, de l’ivoire et des cornes de rhinocéros, de l’étain et de l’or de Sumatra, du rotin, des bois rouges et d’autres bois rares, des pierres précieuses de Bornéo, des oiseaux rares et des animaux exotiques, du fer, du santal et des épices d’Indonésie orientale, d’Inde et d’Asie du Sud-est, et enfin, de Chine, des porcelaines, des laques, du brocart, des tissues et de la soie.

Avec comme capitale la ville de Palembang (à ce jour 1,7 million d’habitants) sur la rivière Musi dans ce qui est aujourd’hui la province méridionale de Sumatra, ce royaume d’inspiration hindouiste et bouddhiste, qui a prospéré du VIIIe au XIIIe siècle, a été le premier royaume indonésien d’importance et la première puissance maritime indonésienne.

Dès le VIIe siècle, il règne sur une grande partie de Sumatra, la partie occidentale de l’île de Java et une partie importante de la péninsule malaise. Avec une étendue au Nord jusqu’en Thaïlande, où des vestiges archéologiques de cités Sriwijaya existent encore.

Le musée de Palembang — une ville où communautés chinoises, indiennes, arabes et yéménites, chacun avec ses institutions particulières, co-prospèrent depuis plusieurs générations — raconte à merveille comment la Route de la soie maritime a engendré un enrichissement culturel mutuel exemplaire.

Madagascar, le sanskrit et la Route de la cannelle

Carte de l’expansion des langues austronésiennes.

Aujourd’hui, Madagascar est habitée par des noirs et des asiatiques. Des tests ADN ont confirmé ce que l’on savait depuis longtemps : de nombreux habitants de l’île descendent de marins malais et indonésiens qui ont mis pied sur l’ile vers l’année 830 lorsque l’Empire Sriwijaya étend son influence maritime vers l’Afrique.

Autre élément de preuve de cette présence, le fait que la langue parlée sur l’île emprunte des mots sanskrits et indonésiens.

Sans surprise, la carte de l’expansion des langues austronésiennes est quasiment superposable à celle de la Route de la cannelle (ci-dessus).

Bas-relief du temple bouddhiste de Borobudur (VIIIe siècle, Indonésie).

Pour démontrer la faisabilité de ces voyages maritimes, une équipe de chercheurs a navigué en 2003 d’Indonésie jusqu’au Ghana en passant par Madagascar à bord du Borobudur, la reconstruction d’un des voiliers figurant dans plusieurs des 1300 bas-reliefs décorant le temple bouddhiste de Borobudur sur l’île de Java en Indonésie, datant du VIIIe siècle.

Beaucoup pensent que ce navire est une représentation de ceux que les marchands indonésiens utilisaient autrefois pour traverser l’océan jusqu’en Afrique. Les navigateurs indonésiens utilisaient habituellement des bateaux relativement petits. Pour en assurer l’équilibre, ils les équipaient de balanciers, aussi bien doubles (ngalawa) que simples.

Leurs bateaux, dont la coque était taillée dans un seul tronc d’arbre, étaient appelés sanggara. Dans leurs traversées vers l’est, les marchands de l’archipel indonésien pouvaient jadis se rendre jusqu’à Hawaii et la Nouvelle-Zélande, à une distance de plus de 7 000 km.

Sur la Route de la cannelle, le navire a fait le trajet d’Indonésie jusqu’à Accra au Ghana, en passant par Madagascar.

En tout cas, le bateau des chercheurs, équipé d’un mât de 18 mètres de haut, a réussi à parcourir la route Jakarta – Maldives – cap de Bonne-Espérance – Ghana, une distance de 27 750 kilomètres, soit plus de la moitié de la circonférence de la Terre !

L’expédition visait à refaire une route bien précise : celle de la cannelle, qui a conduit les marchands indonésiens jusqu’en Afrique pour vendre des épices, dont la cannelle, une denrée très recherchée à l’époque. Elle était déjà très prisée dans les régions du bassin méditerranéen bien avant l’ère chrétienne.

Sur les murs du temple égyptien de Deir el-Bahari (Louksor), une peinture représente une expédition navale importante dont il est dit qu’elle aurait été ordonnée par la reine Hatshepsout, qui régna de 1503 à 1482 avant JC.

Autour de cette peinture des hiéroglyphes expliquent que ces navires transportaient diverses espèces de plantes et d’essences odorantes destinées au culte. Une de ces denrées est la cannelle. Riche en arôme, elle était une composante importante des cérémonies rituelles dans les royaumes d’Egypte.

Or, la cannelle poussait à l’origine en Asie centrale, dans l’est de l’Himalaya et dans le nord du Vietnam. Les Chinois méridionaux l’ont transplantée de ces régions dans leur propre pays et l’ont cultivée sous le nom de gui zhi.

Carte de la route de la cannelle.

De la Chine, le gui zhi s’est répandu dans tout l’archipel indonésien, trouvant là une terre d’accueil très fertile, en particulier dans les îles Moluques. De fait, le commerce international de la cannelle était alors un monopole tenu par les marchands indonésiens. La cannelle d’Indonésie était appréciée pour son excellente qualité et son prix très compétitif.

Les Indonésiens parcouraient donc à la voile de grandes distances, jusqu’à plus de 8 000 km, traversant l’océan Indien jusqu’à Madagascar et le nord-est de l’Afrique. De Madagascar, les produits étaient transportés à Rhapta, dans une région côtière qui prit par la suite le nom de Somalie. Au-delà, les marchands arabes les expédiaient vers le nord jusqu’à la mer Rouge.

Le détroit de Malacca

Pour la Chine, le détroit de Malacca a toujours représenté un intérêt stratégique majeur. À l’époque où le grand amiral chinois Zheng He mène la première de ses expéditions vers l’Inde, le Proche-Orient et l’Afrique de l’Est entre 1405 et 1433, un pirate chinois du nom de Chen Zuyi a pris le contrôle de Palembang. Zheng He défait la flotte de Chen et capture les survivants. Du coup, le détroit est redevenu une route maritime sûre.

Selon la tradition, un prince de Sriwijaya, Parameswara, se réfugie sur l’île de Temasek (l’actuelle Singapour) mais s’établit finalement sur la côte ouest de la péninsule malaise vers 1400 et fonde la ville de Malacca, qui deviendra le plus grand port d’Asie du Sud-est, à la fois successeur de Sriwijaya et précurseur de Singapour.

Suite au déclin de Sriwijaya, c’est le Royaume de Majapahit (1292-1527), fondé à la fin du XIIIe siècle sur l’île de Java, qui dominera la plus grande partie de l’Indonésie actuelle.

C’est l’époque où les marins arabes commencent à s’installer dans la région.

Le royaume de Majapahit noua des relations avec celui le Royaume de Champa (192-1145 ; 1147-1190 ; 1220-1832) (Sud Vietnam), du Cambodge, du Siam (la Thaïlande) et du Myanmar méridional.

Le royaume de Majapahit envoyait également des missions en Chine. Alors que ses dirigeants étendirent leur pouvoir sur d’autres îles et mirent à sac les royaumes voisins, il chercha avant tout à augmenter sa part et son contrôle sur le commerce des marchandises transitant par l’archipel.

L’île de Singapour et la partie la plus au sud de la péninsule malaise fut un carrefour clé de l’ancienne Route de la soie maritime. Des fouilles archéologiques entrepris dans l’estuaire du Kallang et le long du fleuve Singapour, ont permis de découvrir des milliers d’éclats de verre, des perles naturelles ou en or, des céramiques et des pièces de monnaie chinoises de la période des Song du nord (960-1127).

La montée de l’Empire mongol au milieu du XIIIe siècle va provoquer l’accroissement du commerce par la mer et contribuer à la vitalité de la Route de la soie maritime. Marco Polo, après un voyage terrestre qui dura 17 ans, vers la Chine reviendra par bateau. Après avoir été témoin d’un naufrage, il passa de la Chine à Sumatra en Indonésie avant de remettre pied à terre à Ormuz en Perse (Iran).

Sous les dynasties Yuan et Ming

Sous la dynastie des Song, on exporte, vers le Japon, une quantité importante d’articles de soie. Sous celle des Yuan (1271-1368), le gouvernement instaure le Shi Bo Si, bureau en charge des échanges commerciaux, dans de nombreux ports comme, notamment, Ningbo, Canton, Shanghai, Ganpu, Wenzhou et Hangzhou, permettant, ainsi, l’exportation des soieries vers le Japon.

Durant les dynasties des Tang, Song et Yuan, et au début de celle des Ming, on assiste, dans chaque port, à la création d’un département océanique de négoce pour gérer l’ensemble des échanges commerciales extérieures maritimes.

Le commerce avec les sud de l’Inde et du golfe Persique fleurit. Le commerce avec l’Afrique de l’Est se développe également en fonction de la mousson et apporte de l’ivoire, de l’or et des esclaves. En Inde, des guildes commencent à contrôler le commerce chinois sur la côte du Malabar et au Sri Lanka. Les relations commerciales se formalisent tout en restant soumises à une forte concurrence. Cochin et Kozhikode (Calicut), deux grandes villes de l’Etat indien du Kerala, rivalisent alors pour dominer ce commerce.

Les explorations maritimes de l’amiral Zheng He

Carte des expéditions maritimes de l’amiral Zheng He.

Les explorations maritimes chinoises connaitront leur apogée au début du XVe siècle sous la dynastie Ming (1368-1644) qui, pour diriger sept expéditions diplomatiques navales, choisira un eunuque musulman de la cour, l’amiral Zheng He.

Financées par l’Empereur Ming Yongle, ces missions pacifiques en Asie du Sud-est, en Afrique de l’Est, dans l’Océan indien, dans le golfe Persique et en Mer Rouge, viseront avant tout à démontrer le prestige et la grandeur de la Chine et de son Empereur. Il s’agit également de reconnaître une trentaine d’Etats et de nouer des relations politiques et commerciales avec eux.

En 1409, avant une des expéditions, l’amiral chinois Zheng He demanda à des artisans de fabriquer une stèle en pierre taillée à Nanjing, actuelle capitale de la province du Jiangsu (est de la Chine). La stèle voyagea avec la flottille et fut laissée au Sri Lanka comme cadeau à un temple bouddhiste local. Des prières aux divinités en trois langues -chinois, persan et tamoul- furent gravés sur la stèle. Elle fut retrouvé en 1911 dans la ville de Galle, dans le sud-ouest du Sri Lanka et une réplique se trouve aujourd’hui en Chine.

L’armada de Zheng était composée de vraquiers armés, le plus modeste étant plus grand que les caravelles de Christophe Colomb. Les plus vastes atteignaient une longueur de 100 et une largeur de 50 mètres. D’après les chroniques Ming de l’époque, une expédition pouvait comprendre 62 navires avec 500 personnes à bord chacun. Certains d’entre eux transportaient la cavalerie militaire et d’autres des réservoirs d’eau potable. La construction navale chinoise était en avance. La technique de cloisons hermétiques, imitant la structure interne du bambou, offrait une sécurité incomparable. Elle fut la norme pour la flotte chinoise avant d’être copiée par les Européens 250 ans plus tard. A cela s’ajoutait l’emploi de la boussole et celui de cartes célestes peintes sur soie.

La synergie qui a pu exister entre marins arabes, indiens et chinois, tous des hommes de mer qui fraternisent face à l’adversité de l’océan, a de quoi nous impressionner. Par exemple, certains historiens estiment qu’il n’est pas exclu que le nom « Sindbad le marin », qui apparaît dans la fable d’origine perse qui conte les aventures d’un marin du temps de la dynastie des Abbassides (VIIIe siècle) et fut intégrée dans les Contes des Mille et Une Nuits, dérive du mot Sanbao, le surnom honorifique donné par l’Empereur chinois à l’amiral Zheng He, signifiant littéralement « Les trois joyaux », c’est-à-dire les trois vertus capitales indissociables communes aux principales philosophies que sont l’Eveil (qui permet d’apprendre), l’Altruisme (qui permet la compréhension de l’autre) et l’Equité (qui invite à partager avec lui).

Statue de l’amiral Zheng Ho devant une mosquée construite en son honneur en Indonésie.

Aussi bien en Chine (à Hong-Kong, à Macao, à Fuzhou, à Tianjin et à Nanjing) qu’à Singapour, en Malaisie et en Indonésie, des musées maritimes mettent les expéditions de l’amiral Zheng en valeur.

Soulignons cependant qu’au moins douze autres amiraux ont effectué des expéditions similaires en Asie du Sud-est et dans l’océan Indien. En 1403, l’amiral Ma Pi a conduit une expédition jusqu’en Indonésie et en Inde. Wu Bin, Zhang Koqing et Hou Xian en ont fait d’autres. Après que la foudre avait provoqué un incendie de la Cité interdite, une dispute éclata entre la classe des eunuques, partisans des expéditions, et des mandarins lettrés, qui obtiendront l’arrêt d’expéditions jugées trop onéreuses. Le dernier voyage a eu lieu entre 1430 et 1433, c’est-à-dire 64 ans avant que l’explorateur portugais Vasco da Gama ne se rende sur les mêmes lieux en 1497.

Le Japon, de son coté, de façon similaire, a restreint ses contacts avec le monde extérieure lors de la période Tokugawa (1600-1868) bien que son commerce avec la Chine ne fut jamais suspendu. Ce n’est qu’après la restauration Meiji en 1868 qu’un Japon ouvert au monde a ré-émergé.

Dans un repli sur eux-mêmes, le commerce aussi bien la Chine que du Japon tomba aux mains de comptoirs maritimes comme Malacca en Malaisie ou Hi An au Vietnam, deux villes aujourd’hui reconnues par l’Unesco comme patrimoine de l’humanité. H ?i An était un port étape majeur sur la route maritime reliant l’Europe et le Japon en passant par l’Inde et la Chine. Dans les épaves de navires retrouvées à Hi An, les chercheurs ont retrouvé des céramiques qui attendaient leur départ pour le Sinaï en Egypte.

Histoire des ports chinois

Au fil des années, on assiste à une évolution en ce qui concerne les principaux ports de la Route maritime de la Soie. A partir des années 330, Canton et Hepu étaient les deux ports les plus importants.

Cependant, Quanzhou se substitue à Canton, de la fin de la dynastie des Song à celle des Yuan.

A cette époque, Quanzhou, dans la province du Fujian et Alexandrie en Egypte étaient considérés comme les plus vastes ports du monde. A cause de la politique de fermeture sur le monde extérieur imposée à partir de 1435 et de l’influence des guerres, Quanzhou a été, progressivement, remplacé par les ports de Yuegang, Zhangzhou et Fujian.

Dès le début du IVe siècle, Canton est un important port de la Route maritime de la Soie. Peu à peu, il devient le plus vaste mais, également, le port d’Orient le plus renommé à travers le monde sous les dynasties des Tang et des Song. Durant cette période, la route maritime reliant Canton au golfe persique en passant par la Mer de Chine méridionale et l’océan Indien est la plus longue du monde.

Bien que plus tard supplanté par Quanzhou sous la dynastie des Yuan, le port de Canton demeurera le second plus grand port commercial de Chine. Par comparaison avec les autres, on le considère comme étant un port durablement prospère au cours des 2000 ans d’histoire de la Route maritime de la Soie.

Le système tributaire

La dernière dynastie impériale chinoise, celle des Qing, a régné de 1644 à 1912. Depuis l’arrivée de la dynastie Ming, les échanges commerciaux maritimes avec la Chine s’organisaient de deux façons :

Né sous les Ming en 1368, et le « système tributaire » atteindra son apogée sous les Qing. Il prend alors la forme raffinée d’une hiérarchie inclusive mutuellement bénéfique. Les Etats qui y adhèrent faisaient preuve de respect et de reconnaissance en présentant régulièrement à l’Empereur un tribut composé de produits locaux et en exécutant certaines cérémonies rituelles, notamment le « kowtow » (trois génuflexions et neuf prosternations). Ils demandaient également l’investiture de leurs dirigeants par l’Empereur et adoptaient le calendrier chinois. Outre la Chine, on y retrouvait le Japon, la Corée, le Vietnam, la Thaïlande, l’Indonésie, les îles Ryükyü, le Laos, le Myanmar et la Malaisie.

Paradoxalement tout en occupant un statut culturel central, le système tributaire offrait à ses vassaux un statut d’entité souveraine et leur permettait d’exercer leur autorité sur une aire géographique donnée. L’Empereur gagnait leur soumission en se préoccupant vertueusement de leur bien-être et en promouvant une doctrine de non-intervention et de non-exploitation. En effet, d’après les historiens, en termes financiers, la Chine ne s’est jamais enrichie d’une façon directe avec le système tributaire. En général, tous les frais de voyage et de séjour des missions tributaires étaient couverts par le gouvernement chinois. En plus des coûts de fonctionnement du système, les cadeaux offerts par l’Empereur avaient en général beaucoup plus de valeur que les tributs qu’il recevait. Chaque mission tributaire avait en effet le droit d’être accompagnée par un grand nombre de commerçants et une fois le tribut présenté à l’Empereur, le commerce pouvait commencer.

Il est à noter que, lorsqu’un pays perdait son statut d’Etat tributaire suite à un désaccord, ce dernier essayait à tout prix et parfois de façon violente d’être à nouveau autorisé à payer le tribut.

Le système de Canton

Port de Canton en 1850 avec les missions commerciales américaines, françaises et britanniques.

Le deuxième système concernait les puissances étrangères, principalement européennes, désireuses de faire du commerce avec la Chine. Il passait par le port de Guangzhou (à l’époque appelé Canton), le seul port accessibles aux Occidentaux.

Ainsi, les marchands, notamment ceux de la Compagnie britanniques des Indes orientales, pouvaient accoster, non pas dans le port mais devant la côte de Canton, d’octobre à mars, lors de la saison commerciale. C’est à Macao, à l’époque une possession Portugaise, que les Chinois leur fournissait le cas échéant une permission à cet effet. Les représentants de l’Empereur autorisaient alors des marchands chinois (les hongs) de commercer avec des navires étrangers tout en les chargeant de collecter les droits de douane avant qu’ils ne repartent.

Cette façon de commercer s’est amplifiée à la fin du XVIIIe siècle, notamment avec la forte demande anglaise de thé. C’est d’ailleurs du thé chinois de Fujian que les « insurgés » américains ont jeté à la mer lors de la fameuse « Boston Tea Party » de décembre 1773, un des premiers événements contre l’Empire britannique qui déclenchera la Révolution américaine. Des produits en provenance de l’Inde, en particulier le coton et l’opium furent échangés par la Compagnie des Indes orientales contre du thé, de la porcelaine et de la soie.

Les droits de douane collectés par le système de Canton étaient une source majeure de revenus pour la dynastie des Qing bien qu’elle bannira l’achat d’opium en provenance de l’Inde. Cette restriction imposée par l’Empereur chinois en 1796 conduira au déclenchement des guerres de l’Opium, la première dès 1839. En même temps, des rebellions éclatèrent dans les années 1850-60 contre le règne affaibli des Qing, doublées de guerres supplémentaires contre des puissances européennes hostiles.

Sac du Palais d’été par les Britanniques et les Français en 1860.

En 1860, l’ancien Palais d’été (parc Yuanming), avec un ensemble de pavillons, de temples, de pagodes et de librairies, c’est-à-dire la résidence des empereurs de la dynastie Qing à 15 kilomètres au nord-ouest de la Cité interdite de Pékin, fut ravagée par les troupes britanniques et françaises lors de la Seconde guerre de l’opium. Cette agression reste dans l’histoire comme l’un des pires actes de vandalisme culturel du XIXe siècle. Le Palais fut mis à sac une deuxième fois en 1900 par une alliance de huit pays contre la Chine.

Aujourd’hui, on peut y admirer une statue de Victor Hugo et un texte qu’il avait écrit pour s’élever contre Napoléon III et les destructions de l’impérialisme français, pour rappeler que cela était non pas le fait d’une nation, mais celui d’un gouvernement.

A la fin de la première guerre mondiale, la Chine disposait de 48 ports ouverts où les étrangers pouvaient commercer en suivant leurs propres juridictions. Le XXe siècle fut une ère de révolutions et de changements sociaux. La fondation de la République populaire de Chine en 1949 engendra un repli sur soi.

Ce n’est qu’en 1978 que Deng Xiaoping annonça une politique d’ouverture sur le monde extérieur en vue de la modernisation du pays.

Initiative chinoise des Nouvelles Routes de la soie terrestres et maritimes.

Au XXIe siècle, grâce à l’Initiative une ceinture (économique) une route (maritime) lancée par le Président Xi Jingping, la Chine ré-émerge comme une grande puissance mondiale offrant des coopérations mutuellement bénéfiques au service d’un meilleur avenir partagé pour l’humanité.

Merci de partager !
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •