Étiquette : Islam

 

Mutazilism and Arab astronomy, two bright stars in our firmament

By Karel Vereycken

(texte original en français)

“The ink of the scholar is more sacred than the blood of the martyr.”
“Seek knowledge from the Cradle to the Grave.”
“Seek knowledge even as far as China.”

Sayings (Hadith) most often attributed to the Prophet.

PROLOGUE

We live in a time of cruel stupidity. While the history of civilization is characterized by multiple cultural contributions allowing an infinite and magnificent mutual enrichment, everything is done to dehumanize us.

By dint of media coverage of the most extreme crimes, notably by claiming that such and such an abject or barbaric act has been committed « in the name » of such and such a belief or religion, everything is done to set us against each other. If we do not react, the famous thesis of a « Clash of Civilizations », concocted by the British Islamologist Bernard Lewis (Henry Kissinger’s, Zbigniew Brzezinski’s and Samuel Huntington’s mentor) as an evil tool of geopolitical manipulation, will become a self-fulfilling prophecy.

INTRODUCTION

In order to combat prejudices and dangerous misunderstandings about “Islam” (with 1.6 billion believers a non-negligible part of the world’s population), here follows a brief overview of the major contributions of the Arab-Muslim civilization.

By recalling two major contributions of the “Golden Age” of Islam, notably Arab astronomy and mutazilism, what is at stake here is the recognition that –just like Memphis, Thebes, Alexandria, Athens and Rome– Baghdad, Damascus and Cordoba were major crucibles of a universal civilization which is ours today.

While Europe has come to recognize that the invention of printing took place in China long before Gutenberg, and that America was visited way before Christopher Columbus, consensus and group think keeps repeating that the Arabs contributed nothing to the progress of science.

In the 1300 years separating the Greek astronomer from Alexandria, Claudius Ptolemy (ca. 100-178 AD) from the Polish Nicolaus Copernicus (1473-1543), they pretend, nothing but “a black hole”.

In 1958, in his book The Sleepwalkers, British Hungarian writer Alfred Koestler, who helped Sydney Hook to co-found the CIA’s cultural cold war front, the Congress for Cultural Freedom, epitomized western arrogance, writing:

the Arabs had merely been the go-betweens, preservers and transmitters of the heritage. They had little scientific originality and creativeness of their own. During the centuries when they were the sole keepers of the treasure, they did little to put it to use. (…) and by the fifteenth century, the scientific heritage of Islam had largely been taken over by the Portuguese Jews. But the Jews, too, were no more than go-betweens, a branch of the devious Gulf-stream which brought back to Europe its Greek and Alexandrine heritage, enriched by Indian and Persian additions.

Nothing is more false. Definitely, one must be born on the right spot to be allowed to have a seat in the train of history…

Copernicus himself, unlike Koestler, was perfectly familiar with Arab astronomy. In 1543, in his De Revolutionibus, he quotes several Arab scientists, more precisely Al-Battani, al-Bitruji, al-Zarqallu, Ibn Rushd (Averroes) and Thabit ibn Qurra. Copernicus also refers to al-Battani in his Commentariolus, a manuscript published posthumously. Later, the great Johannes Kepler (1571-1630) would also refer to Ibn Al-Haytam in his work on optics.

In reality, Copernicus and even more Kepler, whose creative genius cannot be overrated, came up with answers to questions raised by several generations of Arab astronomers preceding them and whose contribution remains largely ignored and even worse, unexplored. To this day, with about 10,000 manuscripts preserved throughout the world, a large part of which has still not been the subject of a bibliographic inventory, the Arab astronomical corpus constitutes one of the best preserved components of medieval scientific literature waiting to be rediscovered.

Science and religion versus slavery

Miniature of emancipated slave Bilal, Islams first Muezzin.

Before examining the contributions of Arab astronomy, a few words about the intimate link between Islam and the development of science.

According to tradition, it was in 622 CE that the Prophet Muhammad and his companions left Mecca and set out for a simple oasis that would become the city of Medina.

If this event is known as the “Hegira”, an Arabic word for emigration, break-up or exile, it is also because Mohammad broke with a societal model based on blood ties (clan organization), in favor of a model of a shared destiny based on belief. In this new religious and societal model, where each person is supposed to be a “brother,” it is no longer permissible to abandon the poor or the weak as was the case before.

The powerful clans in Mecca did everything they could to eliminate this new form of society, which diminished their influence.

The “Medina Constitution” allegedly proclaimed equality among all believers, whether they were free men or slaves, Arabs or non-Arabs.

The Koran advocates strict equality between Arabs and non-Arabs in accordance with the Prophet, who said, in his farewell address:

“There is no superiority of an Arab over a non-Arab, or of a non-Arab over an Arab, and no superiority of a white person over a black person or of a black person over a white person, except on the basis of personal piety and righteousness.”

(Reported by Al-Bayhaqi and authenticated by Shaykh Albani in Silsila Sahiha no. 2700).

Hence, if after the Prophet’s passing away, slavery and slave trade became a common practice in close to all Muslim countries, he cannot be held accountable. Zayd Ibn Harithah, according to tradition, after having been the slave of Khadija, Muhammad’s wife, was freed and even adopted by Muhammad as his own son.

For his part, Abu Bakr, Muhammad’s companion and successor as the first Caliph (Arab word for “successor”), also freed Bilal ibn-Raba, the son of a former Abyssinian princess who had been enslaved. Bilal, who had a magnificent voice, was even appointed the first muezzin, that is to say the one who calls for prayer five times a day from the top of one of the mosque’s minarets.

The Sultan Ahmed Mosque, popularly known as the Blue Mosque, in Mazar-e-Sharif, Balkh Province, Afghanistan.

Among the first verses revealed to the Prophet Muhammad one finds :

Read! And your Lord is the Most Generous, Who taught by the pen ; Taught man that which he knew not.”

(Surat 96).

The Prophet also states,

The best among you (Muslims) are those who learn the Koran and teach it.”

Other sayings, often attributed to the Prophet, clearly invite Muslims to seek knowledge and cherish science :

The ink of the scholar is more sacred than the blood of the martyr”.
Seek knowledge from the Cradle to the Grave”.
Seek knowledge even as far as China”.

Historical center of Samarkand (Ouzbekistan). The Registan and its three madrasahs.
Astronomical and mathematical notations. Manuscript page from Timbuktu.

The mosque is therefore much more than a place of worship, it is a school of all sciences, where scholars are trained. It serves as a social and educational institution: it may be accompanied by a madrassa (Koranic school), a library, a training center, or even a university.

As in most religions, in Islam, practices and rituals are punctuated by astronomical events (years, seasons, months, days, hours). Every worshipper must pray five times a day at times that vary depending on where he or she is on Earth: at sunrise (Ajr), when the sun is at its zenith (Dhohr), in the afternoon (Asr), at sunset (Magrib) and at the beginning of the night (Icha). Astronomy, as a spiritual occasion to fine-tune one’s earthly existence according to the harmony of the Heavens, is omnipresent.

As an example, to underscore its importance, July 16, 622 AD, the first day of the lunar year, was declared the first day of the Hegira calendar. And during the eclipse of the sun, mosques host a special prayer.

Islam encourages Muslims to guide themselves by the stars. The Koran states :

And He is the One who made the stars for you to guide you with them in darkness of the land and the sea”.

With such an incentive, early Muslims could not but feel compelled to perfect astronomical and navigational instruments. As a result, today more than half of the stars used for navigation bear Arabic names. It was only natural that the faithful constantly tried to improve astronomical calculations and observations.

The first reason to do so is that during the Muslim prayer, the worshipper has to prostrate himself in the direction of the Kaaba in Mecca, so he has to know how to find this direction wherever he is on Earth. And the construction of a mosque will be decided according to the same data.

The second reason is the Muslim calendar. The Koran states :

The number of months in the sight of Allah is twelve (in a year)- so ordained by Him the day He created the heavens and the earth; of them four are sacred: that is the straight usage.”

Clearly, the Muslim calendar is based on the lunar months, which are approximately 29.5 days long. But 12 times 29.5 days is only 345 days in the year. This is far from the 365 days, 6 hours, 9 minutes and 4 seconds that measure the duration of the rotation of the Earth around the Sun…

Finally, a last challenge was posed by the interpretation of the lunar movement. The months, in the Muslim religion, do not begin with the astronomical new moon, defined as the moment when the moon has the same ecliptic longitude as the sun (it is therefore invisible, drowned in the solar albedo); the months begin when the lunar crescent starts to appear at dusk.

The Koran says: “(Muhammad), they ask you about the different phases of the moon. Tell them that they are there to indicate to people the phases of time and the pilgrimage season.”

For all these reasons, the Muslims could not be satisfied with either the Christian or the Hebrew calendar, and had to create a new one.

Spherical geometry

In order to forecast the phases of the moon, new methods of calculation and new instruments capable of observing them were required. The calculation of the day when the crescent moon starts to become visible again was a formidable challenge for the Arab scholars. To predict this day, it was necessary to be able to describe its movement in relation to the horizon, a problem whose resolution belongs to a rather sophisticated spherical geometry.

It was the determination of the direction of Mecca from a given location and the time of prayers that led the Muslims to develop such geometry. To solve these problems, it is necessary to know how to calculate the side of a spherical triangle of the celestial sphere from its three angles and the other two sides; to find the exact time, for example, it is necessary to know how to construct the triangle whose vertices are the zenith, the north pole, and the position of the Sun.

The field of astronomy has strongly stimulated the birth of other sciences, in particular geometry, mathematics, geography and cartography. Some people like to recall that Platonists and Aristotelians were arguing about rather abstract concepts, each of them believing that reason was sufficient to understand nature. Arab astronomy, on the other hand, played a decisive role in the emergence of a true scientific method by verifying the various hypotheses, by building measuring instruments and astronomical observatories and by rigorously recording observations over many years.

MUTAZILISM

Socrates discussng philosophy with his disciples, Arabic miniature from a manuscript, Turkey 13th Century.

The question then arises as to where this infatuation with science and astronomy could have come from, in a culture essentially centered on religion?

A first answer comes from the fact that in the 8th century, shortly after the birth of Sunnism (656), Kharidjism (657) and Shi’ism (660), but independently of these currents, a school of Muslim theological and philosophical thought appeared, founded by the revolutionary theologian Wasil ibn Ata (700-748), a current known as “mutazilism” (or motazilism), branded in the West as “the rationalists” of Islam. One explanation of its name came from the fact that the mutazili refused to take part in the internal strife inside factions using theological interpretations for earthly power, the arab word iʿtazala meaning “to withdraw”.

Wasil was born in Medina in the Arabian Peninsula and moved to Basra, now in Iraq. From there he formed an intellectual movement that spread all over the Arab-Muslim world. Many of his followers were merchants and non-Arabs (mawâlî) from Iranian or Aramaic “converted” families, victims of the Omayyad dynasty’s discriminating policies between Arabs and non-Arabs. This hypothesis is sufficient to back the claim of a Mutazilite participation in the overthrow of the Omayyad and that dynasty’s replacement with the Abbasid.

In a clear break with dualistic cosmology (Mazdeism, Zoroastrianism, Manichaeism, etc.), Mutazilism insists on the absolute unity of God, conceived as an entity outside time and space. For them, there is a close relationship between the unity of the Muslim community (Ummah) and the worship of the Lord. The Mutazilites are closely inspired by the Koran, and it is quite wrong to present them as the “free thinkers” of Islam.

However, “we reject faith as the only way to religion if it rejects reason,” the Mutazilite saying goes. Relying on reason (the logos dear to the Greek thinkers Socrates and Plato), which it considers compatible with Islamic doctrines, Mutazilism affirms that man can, outside of any divine revelation, access knowledge.

Just as Augustine, a christian, emphasized man can advance on the path of truth, not only through the Gospel (revelation), but by reading “the Book of Nature”, a reflection and foretaste of divine wisdom. One book of the Bible, The Book of Wisdom, recognizes that

For from the greatness and the beauty of created things
their original author,
by analogy, is seen.

(Book of Wisdom, 13:5)

Muzatilism gives human reason (the faculty of thinking) and freedom (the faculty of acting) a place and importance not only unknown in other trends of Islam but even in most philosophical and religious currents of the time. Against fatalism (“mektoub!” = it was written!), which was the dominant tendency in Islam, mutazilism affirms that the human being is responsible for his acts.

More than five centuries before Erasmus, the five principles of the Mutazilite faith offered already the foundations to solve most of the sterile theological disputes that would destroy the Renaissance and throw Europe in the abyss of self-destruction known as the “wars of religion”.

Here are the five principles, described by the Mutazilite theologian Abdel al Jabbar Ibn Ahmad (935-1025) and summarized in 2015 by economist Nadim Michel Kalife:

Monotheism (Al Tawhid) whose concept of God is beyond the simple intellect of the human mind. That is why the verses of the Koran describing God “sitting” on a throne should be interpreted only allegorically and not literally. Hence the Mutazilites called their opponents anthropomorphists who sought to reduce God who is unknowable to a human appearance. And they concluded that this one detail (!) of the Koran is sufficient to prove that the Koran is not “uncreated” but “created” by Allah, via man, to make it accessible to the believer, and therefore, that it can and should evolve and adapt according to the times and circumstances ;

Divine justice (Adl) is about the origin of evil in our world where God is all-powerful. Mutazilism proclaims free will, where evil is man’s doing and not God’s will, because God is perfect and therefore cannot do evil or determine man to do it. And, if human wrongdoings were the will of God, punishment would lose all meaning since man would be doing nothing but respecting the divine will. This unquestionable logic allowed Mutazilism to refute predestination and the « mektoub » of the Sunni schools;

Promise and threat (al-Wa’d wa al-Wa’id): this principle concerns the judgment of man at his death and that of the last judgment where God will reward the obedient in the heavenly paradise, and punish those who disobeyed him by damning them eternally in the fires of hell;

The intermediate degree (al-manzilatu bayn al-manzilatayn), the first principle opposing Mutazilism to the Sunni schools. A great sinner (murder, theft, fornication, false accusation of fornication, drinking alcohol, etc. ) should be judged neither as a Muslim (as Sunnism thinks) nor as a disbeliever or kâfir (as the Kharidjites think), but considered in an intermediate degree from which, when he dies, he will go to hell if he failed to be redeemed by God’s mercy ;

To order the good and blame the blameworthy (al-amr bil ma’ruf wa al-nahy ‘an al munkar): this principle authorizes even rebellion against authority when it is unjust and illegitimate, to prevent the victory of evil over all. This principle attracted the hatred of the ulama (theologians) and imams (predicators) who saw it as a manouver to weaken their own authority over the faithful. And the Seljuk Turks considered it a serious danger since it called into question their power… over the Arabs.

Mutazilism under the Abbasid

Abbasid Caliphate.
Caliph with his advisors. Maqamat of al-Hariri Illustration by Yahyá al-Wasiti, 1237.

In Baghdad, it was with the rise of the Abbasid Caliphate in 749 that Mutazilism gained influence, first under the Caliph Hâroun al-Rachîd (765-809) (“Aaron the Well-Guided”) and then under his son, Al-Ma’mûn (786-833) (“The one to be trusted”). Shortly before his death in 833, the latter made Mutazilism the official doctrine of the Abbasid Empire.

This was too much for the conservative ulama and imams who rebelled against the Caliph’s enlightened vision that created a space for secular society and limited their grip over society. Faced with the revolt, the Abbasid administration (made up largely of Persians), which was won over to Mutazilism, carried out a ruthless crackdown on Sunni (Arab) clerics for fifteen years, from 833 to 848. This bloody persecution left an increasingly bitter taste in people’s minds, especially when the Abbasid power refused to release Muslim prisoners in the hands of the Byzantines if they did not renounce the dogma of the “uncreated” nature of the Koran…

Finally, in 848, Caliph Jafar al-Mutawakkil (847-861), changed course completely and asked the traditionalists to preach hadiths according to which Muhammad had condemned the Mutazilites and their supporters.

Dialectical theology (Kalâm) was banned and the Mutazilites were not any longer welcome at the Baghdad court. This was also the end of the spirit of tolerance and the return of persecution against Christians and Jews. If the craze for science continued, Mutazilism disappeared with the fall of the Abbasids and the destruction of Baghdad by the Mongols in the 13th century.

Mutazilism also influenced Judaism. The Kitab Al-Amanat Wa’l-I’tiqadat – that is, the Book of Beliefs and Opinions – by the tenth-century Jewish rabbinic scholar Saadia Gaon (882-942), who lived in Baghdad, draws its inspiration from Christian theological literature as well as from Islamic models. The Kitab al-Tawhid, the Book of Divine Unity, by Saadia’s Karaite contemporary, Jacob Qirqisani (d. 930), is unfortunately lost.

This makes the German Islamologist Sabine Schmidtke say:

The new tradition of Jewish rational thought that emerged in the course of the ninth century was, in its initial phase, mainly informed by Christian theological literature, both in its content and methodology. Increasingly, specifically Mutazilite Islamic ideas, such as theodicy [*1] and human free will, as well as the emphasis on the oneness of God (tawhid), resonated among Jewish thinkers, many of whom eventually adopted the entire doctrinal system of the Mutazila. The now emerging ‘Jewish Mutazila’ dominated Jewish theological thought for centuries to come.

Leaving aside, therefore, the errors that were very real, it has to be recognized and underscored that the optimistic philosophical vision of Mutazilism (reason, free will, responsibility, perfectibility of man) strongly contributed to the emergence of a true « golden age » of Arab culture and sciences.

The total number of muslim scientists in the 9th Century was larger that the non-muslim scientists in the 15th Century.

Finally, it is not uninteresting to note that today, “neo-Mutazilite” currents are appearing in reaction to obscurantist doctrines and the barbaric acts they provoke. For the Egyptian reformist thinker Ahmad Amin, “the death of mutazilism was the greatest misfortune that befell Muslims; they committed a crime against themselves.”

Bagdad

Artist view of ancient Bagdad. Note the canal that runs through the city and allows it to be integrated into the natural infrastructure of the Tigris River. In reality, the surrounding area was urbanized.

In 762, the second Abbasid caliph Al-Mansur (714-775) (“the victorious”) began construction of a new capital, Baghdad. Called Madinat-As-Salam (City of Peace), it houses the court palace, the mosque and the administrative buildings. Built on a circular plan, it is inspired by previous traditions, notably the one that gave birth to the Iranian city of Gur (current name: Firouzabad).

We are in the heart of fertile Mesopotamia, the “land between the rivers”, essentially the Euphrates and the Tigris, both of which have their source in Turkey. It is here that the Sumerians invented irrigation, agriculture (cereals and livestock) [*3], and writing (3400 years BC), starting in the 10th millennium BC.

Baghdad, a powerful and refined city, reigned over the entire East and became the capital of the Arab world. Crossed by the Tigris River, populated today by some 10 million inhabitants, it remains the largest city in Iraq as well as the second most populated city in the Arab world (behind Cairo in Egypt).

Minaret of the Grand mosque of Samarra that many Westerners believed to be the Tower of Babel…

The Abbasid cities were built on huge sites. The palaces and mosques of Samarra, the new capital from 836, stretch along the banks of the Tigris for 40 kilometers. To match the scale of the sites, monumental buildings were erected, such as the Abu Dulaf Mosque or the Great Mosque of Samarra, which had no equivalent elsewhere. Its curious spiral minaret (52 meters high) inspired in the following centuries the Western representations of the Tower of Babel.

Moreover, by relying on an extremely disciplined and obedient army from Khorassan (a region in north-eastern Iran) [*2], as well as on an elaborate system of stagecoaches and mail distribution, the Abbasid rulers managed to increase their hold on the provincial governors. The latter, who in the time of the Omayyad caliphs paid little tax on the pretext that they had to spend locally for the defense of the caliphate’s borders, now had to pay the taxes imposed by the ruler.

The New “Paper” Road

Thanks to high quanlity paper, arab astronomical research survived.

After the military victory against the Chinese in the battle of Talas (a city in present-day Kyrgyzstan) in 751, the year that marked the most eastern advance of the Abbasid armies, Baghdad opened up to Chinese and Indian cultures.

The Abbasid quickly assimilated a number of Chinese techniques, in particular paper-making, an art developed in Samarkand (capital of Sogdiana, now in Uzbekistan), another stopover city on the Silk Roads. The craftsmen of this city smoothed the paper with an agate stone. The resulting extremely smooth and shiny surface absorbed less ink and as a result, both sides of the same sheet became usable. The Chinese, who had invented silk paper, did not need to smooth their paper because they wrote with brushes and not with pens.

Hâroun al-Rachîd was very interested in the industrial production of paper. He ordered the use of paper in all the administrations of the Empire: it is easier to manufacture, less expensive and more secure than silk, because one cannot easily erase what is written on it. He developed the paper factories of Samarkand and established similar ones in Baghdad, Damascus and Tiberias around 1046 – the paper of Tripoli or Damascus was then referred to, and its quality was considered better than that of Samarkand – in Cairo before 1199, where it was used as a packaging for goods, and in Yemen at the beginning of the 13th century. At the same time, several paper factories were established in North Africa. There were 104 paper factories in Fez, Morocco, before 1106, and 400 paper mills between 1221 and 1240. They will emerge in Andalusia, Spain, in Jativa near Valencia in 1054 and in Toledo in 1085.

Agro-industrial revolution

Watermill in Cordoba, Spain.
Floating watermill, to be attached with cables in a strong current.

The first Abbasid caliphs led the economic transition from the Umayyad model of tribute, booty or the sale of slaves to an economy based on agriculture, manufacturing, trade and taxes. The introduction of more energy dense modes of technologies modes of energy (compared to the former ones), will revolutionize irrigation and agriculture:

–Construction of canals ensuring irrigation and limiting flooding;
–Construction of dams and the exploitation of the mechanical energy they produce;
–Construction of water mills;
–Use of tidal energy;
–Construction of windmills;
–Distillation of kerosene used as fuel for lamps and used since. [*4]

Ancient wind mills in Persia

Industrial uses of water mills in the Islamic world date back to the 7th century. During the time of the Crusades, all provinces of the Islamic world had operating mills, from al-Andalus and North Africa to the Middle East and Central Asia.

These mills performed various agricultural and industrial tasks.

When Erasmus’ follower Cervantes’ Don Quichote starts attacking the windmills of La Mancha, a Spanish region where Arab influence was notable, he not only ironially mocks the cult of chivalry, but also the insane undertaking called the crusades.

Irrigation, inherited from the ancient world (floods of the Nile in Egypt, canals in Mesopotamia, pendulum wells (shadoof), water wheels used to raise water (noria), dams in Transoxiana, Khuzistan and Yemen, underground galleries at the foot of the mountains in Iran (qanat) or in the Maghreb (khettara), is organized thanks to a solid community organization and the intervention of the State.

Abbasid artisans and engineers will develop machines (such as pumps) incorporating crankshafts and use gears in mills and water-lifting machines. They will also use the dams to provide additional power to watermills and water-lifting machines. Such advances will allow the mechanization of many agricultural and industrial tasks and free up the workforce for more creative occupations.

At its peak in the tenth century, Baghdad had a population of 400,000 to 500,000. Its food survival depended entirely on an ingenious system of canals for the irrigation of crops and the management of the recurring floods of the Euphrates and Tigris. Example: the Nahrawan canal, parallel to the Tigris, which allowed the waters of the Tigris to be diverted to protect the capital from flooding.

Agricultural production gains in diversity : cereals (wheat, rice), fruits (apricots, citrus fruits), vegetables, olive oil (Syria and Palestine), sesame (Iraq), roe, rapeseed, flax or castor oil (Egypt), wine production (Syria, Palestine, Egypt), dates, bananas (Egypt), sugar cane.

Breeding remains important for food, for the supply of raw materials (wool, leather) and for transport (camels, dromedaries, horses). Sheep are present everywhere but buffalo farming is developing (marshes of lower Iraq or Orontes). Small poultry, pigeon and bee farms are in high demand. The people’s diet is predominantly vegetarian (rice cake, wheat porridge, vegetables and fruits).

A number of industries will emerge from this agro-industrial revolution, including the first textile factories, the production of ropes, silk and, as noted above, the manufacture of paper. Finally, metalworking, glassware, ceramics, tooling and crafts also experience high levels of growth during this period.

Charlemagne, Baghdad and China

Charlemagne receiving elephant, camel and other gifts sent to him by Hâroun al-Rachîd.

Finally, in the eighth and ninth centuries, seeking to counter the Omayyad and the Byzantine Empire, Abbasid and Carolingian Franks conclude several agreements and alliances.

Three diplomatic missions were sent by Charlemagne to the court of Hâroun al-Rachîd and the latter sent at least two embassies to Charlemagne. The caliph sent him many gifts, such as spices, fabrics, an elephant and an automatic clock, described in the Frankish Royal Annals of 807. It marked the 12 hours with copper balls falling on a plate at each hour, and also had twelve horsemen who appeared in turn at the same intervals.

The same caliph sent a diplomatic mission to Chang’an (now called Xi’an), capital of the Tang dynasty. Chang’an being the eastern terminus of the Silk Road, the western market of Chang’an became the center of world trade. According to the record of the Tang Six Authority, more than 300 nations and regions had trade relations with Chang’an.

Maritime Silk Road

These diplomatic relations with China were contemporary with the maritime expansion of the Muslim world into the Indian Ocean and the Far East. Apart from the Nile, Tigris and Euphrates, navigable rivers were uncommon, so transport by sea was very important. The ships of the caliphate began to sail from Siraf, the port of Basra, to India, the Straits of Malacca and Southeast Asia.

Arab merchants dominated trade in the Indian Ocean until the arrival of the Portuguese in the 16th century. Hormuz was an important center for this trade. There was also a dense network of trade routes in the Mediterranean, along which Muslim countries traded with each other and with European powers such as Venice or Genoa.

The Silk Road crossing Central Asia passed through the Abbasid caliphate between China and Europe. At that time, Canton, or Khanfu in Arabic, a port of 200,000 people in southern China, had a large community of traders from Muslim countries. And when the Chinese Emperor Yongle decided to send his famous flotilla of ships to Africa, he chose Admiral Zheng He (1371-1433), a court eunuch who was born a Muslim. And when in 1497 the Portuguese captain Vasco da Gama reached the Kenyan city of Malindi, he was able to obtain an Arab pilot who took him directly to Kozhikode (Calicut) in India. In short, a sailor who knew how to navigate on the stars.

Scientific and cultural renaissance

Thus, it is under the caliphate of Hâroun al-Rachîd and his son Al-Ma’mûn, that Baghdad and the Abbasids will experience a real golden age, both in the sciences (philosophy, astronomy, mathematics, medicine, etc.) and in the arts (architecture, poetry, music, painting, etc.). For the British writer Jim Al-Khalili, “the fusion of Greek rationalism and Mutazilite Islam will give rise to a humanist movement of a type that will hardly be seen before 15th century Italy.”

In the field of sciences, an assimilation of Hellenistic, Indian and Persian astronomical doctrines took place very early. Several Sanskrit [*5] and Pehlevi [*6] writings were translated into Arabic.

Indian works by the astronomer Aryabhata (476-560), a prominent scientist of the Indian Gupta Renaissance, and the mathematician Brahmagupta (590-668) were cited early on by their Arabic counterparts. A famous translation into Arabic appeared around 777 under the title Zij al-Sindhind (or Indian Astronomical Tables). Sources indicate that this text was translated after the trip of an Indian astronomer invited to the court of the Abbasid caliph Al-Mansur in 770. The Arabs also adopted the sines (inherited from Indian mathematics) which they preferred to the chords used by Greek astronomers. From the same period, a collection of astronomical chronicles compiled over two centuries in Sassanid Persia and known in Arabic as the Zij al-Shah (or Royal Tables).

In the field of music, the Persian-born Arab musician Ishaq al-Mawsili (767-850), among others, can be mentioned. A composer of about two hundred songs, he was also a virtuoso on the oud (a kind of lute with a short neck but no frets). He is credited with the first system of codification of learned Arabic music.

The death of the Prophet Mohammed. Ottoman miniature painting from the Siyer-i Nebi, kept at the Topkapı Sarayı Müzesi, Istanbul (Hazine 1222, folio 414a) . circa 1595. Ottoman miniature painter 492 Siyer-i Nebi 414a

Respecting the visual arts, let us first stress that, contrary to the prevailing opinion, the Koran does not prohibit figurative images. There is no explicitly stated and universally accepted “ban” on images of living figures in Islamic legal texts. On the other hand, Islam, like other major religions, condemns the worship of idols.

From the eighth to the fifteenth century, numerous historical and poetic texts, both Sunni and Shi’a, many of which appeared in Turkish and Persian contexts, include admirable depictions of the Prophet Muhammad. The purpose of these images was not only to praise and pay homage to the Prophet, but represent occasions and central elements for the practice of Muslim faith.

In this respect, the book by the German art historian Hans Belting with the catchy title Florence & Baghdad, Renaissance Art and Arab Science (2011) is not only misleading but downright outrageous. Belting presents “Islam” as an aniconic faith (banning all human and animal representations), while in reality, besides exquisite calligraphy and geometric patterns in search for the infinite, representations of men and animals are an essential part of Islamic artistic expression.

In addition, other religions have experienced strong outbreaks of iconoclasm. For example, and this is one of the reasons why so little is known about ancient Greek painting, between 726 and 843, the Byzantine Empire ordered the systematic destruction of images representing Christ or the saints, whether they were mosaics adorning church walls, painted images or book illuminations.

From there on, Belting, for whom Islam is in essence an aniconic civilization, has great difficulty in demonstrating what he announces in the title: the influence of Arab science (notably Ibn al-Haytam work on human vision) on the Renaissance in Florence (in particular its definition of “geometric perspective”). In fact, presenting himself as an erudite, peaceful and “objective” scholar, Belting’s book feeds into the bellicose thesis of a supposed “Clash” of civilizations, while claiming the opposite.

Frescos of the « desert castle » of Qusayr ‘Amra (Jordan).

The first manifestations of pictorial art in the Arab-Muslim world date back to the Omayyad period (660-750). It is from this period that date the famous “desert castles”, such as Qusayr ‘Amra, in Eastern Jordan. Covered with wall paintings, these palaces reflect a contribution of the Byzantine, but also Persian Sassanid modes of representation. Thus, in the palace of Qusayr ‘Amra, used as a resort by the Caliph or his princes for sport and pleasure, the frescoes depict constellations of the zodiac, hunting scenes, fruits and women in the bath.

In the field of literature, Al-Rashid built up a vast library including a collection of rare books as well as thousands of books that kings and princes of the ancient world offered him.

For example, Kalila and Dimna, also known as the Indian Fables of Bidpaï, one of the most popular works of world literature. Compiled in Sanskrit nearly two thousand years ago, these animal fables, from which Aesop and La Fontaine drew, were translated from China to Ethiopia. Translated into Arabic around 750 by Ibn al-Muqaffa, they were richly illustrated in the Arab, Persian and Turkish worlds. The oldest illustrated Arabic version was probably produced in Syria in the 1200s. The landscape is symbolized by a few elements: a strip of grass, shrubs with stylized leaves and flowers. Men and animals are represented with bright colors and simplified lines.

A true manual for the education for kings, one of the fables evokes the idea,



of creating a university dedicated to the study of languages, ancient and modern,
and to the preservation, in renewed forms, of the heritage of the human species…

Illustration of Kalima and Dimna.


And at the end of his story, the wise Bidpaï warns the young king Dabschelim:



I must insist on this last point: my stories do not require, at this stage, any commentary, any elucidation, any analysis on your part, on mine or on anyone else’s. Of all habits, the worst would be to waste the active substance in recipes for behavior. One must stubbornly resist the temptation to attach nice little rationalizations, snappy formulas, analytical summaries, symbolic markers or any other attempt of classification. Mental encapsulation perverts the remedy and renders it inoperative. It actually short-circuits the true purpose of storytelling, for to explain is to forget. It is also a form of hypocrisy – something toxic, an antidote to the truth. So let the stories you remember act on their own by their very diversity. Get familiar with them, but don’t make them a toy…



Also noteworthy is The Sessions of the poet and man of letters Al-Hariri (1054-1122) [*7], written at the end of the tenth century and which had a tremendous diffusion throughout the Arab world. The text, which recounts the adventures of the brigand Abu Zayd, is particularly suitable for illustration.

Al-Ma’mûn and the Houses of Wisdom (Bayt al-Hikma)

After a violent dispute with his brother who sought to remove him from power, Al-Ma’mûn, the youngest son of Al-Rashid, became the eighth Abbasid caliph in 813. He was particularly interested in the work of scholars, especially those who knew Greek. He gathered in Baghdad thinkers of all beliefs, whom he treated magnificently and with the greatest tolerance. They all wrote in Arabic, a language that allowed them to understand each other. He brought manuscripts from Byzantium to enrich the vast library of his father. Open to scholars, translators, poets, historians, physicians, astronomers, scientists and philosophers, this first public library became the basis of the Bayt Al-Hikma (the “Houses of Wisdom”) combining translation, teaching, research and even public health activities, long before the Western universities. It was here that all known scientific manuscripts of the time, especially Greek writings, were gathered for study.

In Baghdad, this cultural bubbling will not remain confined to the Court but will go down to the street as this description of Baghdad by Ibn Aqul (died in 1119) testifies:

“First there is the large space called the Bridge Square. Then the Birds’ Market, a market where one can find all kinds of flowers and on the sides of which are the elegant stores of the money changers. (…) Then the caterers’ market, the bakers’ market, the butchers’ market, the goldsmiths’ market, unrivaled for the beauty of its architecture: high buildings with teak beams, supporting corbelled rooms. Then there is the huge booksellers’ market, which is also the gathering place for scholars and poets, and the Rusafa market. In the markets of Karkh and the Gate of the Ark, the perfumers do not mix with the merchants of grease and products with unpleasant smells; in the same way the merchants of new objects do not mix with the merchants of used objects.”

Persia, the Nestorians and medicine

Ruins of Gondichapur (Iran)

As a model for the Houses of Wisdom, the Persian influence and precedents are often mentioned. It is true that the Barmakids, a family of Persian origin [*8], had a great influence on the first Abbasid caliphs.

In fact, al-Ma’mûn’s tutor was Jafar ben Yahya Barmaki (767-803), a member of the family of the Armenians and the son of the Persian vizier of his father Al-Rashid. The Persian elite who advised the Abbasid caliphs took a keen interest in the works of the Greeks, whose translation had begun during the reign of the Sassanid king Khosro I Anushirvan (531-579).

The latter founded the Academy of Medicine in Gondichapur. Many Nestorian (Christian) scribes and scholars had taken refuge there after the Council of Ephesus in 431. [*9]

The liturgical language of the Nestorians was Syriac, a Semitic dialect [*10].

A Tang Dynasty Chinese ceramic statuette of a Sogdian merchant riding on a Bactrian camel.

Like the Jews, these Nestorian Christians possessed a cosmopolitan culture and a knowledge of languages (Syriac and Persian) that enabled them to act as intermediaries between Iran and its neighbors. And thanks to their access to the wisdom of ancient Greece, they were often employed as physicians. [*11]

The Academy of Medicine of Gondichapur [*12] had reached its peak in the 5th century thanks to the Syriac scholars expelled from Edessa. In this school, medicine was taught based on the translations of the Greek scholar and physician Claudius Galen. These teachings were put into practice in a large hospital, a tradition taken up in the Muslim world. This school was a meeting place for Greek, Syriac, Persian and Indian scholars, whose scientific influence was mutual. Heir to the Greek medical knowledge of Alexandria, the school of Gondichapur trained several generations of physicians at the court of the Sassanid and later at that of the Muslim Abbasid. As early as 765, the Abbasid caliph Al-Mansur, who reigned from 754 to 775, consulted the head of the Gondichapur hospital, Georgios ben Bakhtichou, and invited him to Baghdad. His descendants will work and teach medicine there. Long after the establishment of Islam, the Arab elites sent their sons to this Nestorian Christian school.

Timothy I (727-823) was the Christian patriarch of the Church of the East (“Nestorian”) between 780 and 823. His first decision was to establish the seat of his church in Baghdad, where it was to remain until the end of the thirteenth century, thus forging privileged links between the Nestorians and the Abbasid caliphs. A man with a good command of Syriac, Arabic, Greek and eventually Pehlevi, Timothy enjoyed the consideration of the Abbasid caliphs Al-Mahdi, Al-Rashid and Al-Ma’mûn.

During his forty-three years of pontificate, the Eastern Church lived in peace. Moreover, the Nestorians played a major role in the spread of Christianity in Central Asia as far as China via the Silk Road. In Central Asia, before the arrival of Islam, it was Sogdian, (the Iranian language of Sogdia and its capital Samarkand) that served as the lingua franca on the Silk Road. [*13]

Translating, understanding, teaching, improving

Scholars at an Abbasid library. Maqamat of al-Hariri Illustration by Yahyá al-Wasiti, 1237.

In Baghdad and Basra, in the Houses of Wisdom, the histories and texts collected after the collapse of the empire of Alexander the Great were translated and made available to scholars, texts initially collated and translated from Syriac into Persian under the aegis of the Sassanid emperors.

The Arab historian and economist Ibn Khaldun (1332-1406), who came from a large Andalusian family of Yemeni origin, paid tribute to this effort to preserve and disseminate the Greek heritage: “What happened to the sciences of the Persians whose writings, at the time of the conquest, were annihilated by order of Omar? Where are the sciences of the Chaldeans, the Assyrians, the inhabitants of Babylon? Where are the sciences that reigned among the Copts in the past? There is only one nation, that of the Greeks, whose scientific productions we possess exclusively, and that is thanks to the care that Al-Ma’mûn took in translating these works.”

These first translations into Arabic made available to the Arab-Muslim world hundreds of texts on philosophy, medicine, logic, mathematics, astronomy, music, etc., from Greek, Pehlevi, Syriac, Hebrew, Sanskrit, etc, including those of Plato, Aristotle, Pythagoras, Sushruta, Hippocrates, Euclid, Charaka, Ptolemy, Claudius Galen, Plotinus, Aryabhata and Brahmagupta.

An illustration of a self-trimming lamp from Ahmad’s (Banu Musa) On Mechanical Devices, written in Arabic.

They were accompanied by reflections, commentaries, translations of commentaries, etc. and gave rise to a new form of literature. According to the Nestorian patriarch Timothy I, it was at the request of the Caliph Al-Mahdi that he translated Aristotle’s Topics from Syriac into Arabic. He also wrote a treatise on astronomy entitled The Book of Stars, now lost.

An astrology and astronomy enthusiast, Al-Ma’mûn once made it a condition of peace with the Byzantine Empire to hand over a copy of the Almagest, Ptolemy’s main work, which was supposed to summarize all Greek astronomical knowledge. In 829, in the upper district of Baghdad, he built the first permanent observatory in the world, the Baghdad Observatory, allowing his astronomers, who had translated the Astronomical Treatise of the Greek Hipparchus of Nicaea (190-120 B.C.), as well as his star register, to methodically monitor the movement of the planets.

Here is what Sâ’id al-Andalusî (1029-1070) tells us about Al-Ma’mûn’s interest in astronomy and his efforts to advance it:

“As soon as Al-Ma’mûn became caliph, his noble soul made every effort to attain wisdom, and to this end he was particularly concerned with philosophy; moreover, the scholars of his time studied in depth a book by Ptolemy and understood the diagrams of a telescope that was drawn therein. So Al-Ma’mûn gathered all the great scholars present throughout the regions of the caliphate, and he asked them to build the same kind of instrument so that they could observe the planets in the same way as Ptolemy had done and those who had preceded him. The object was built and the scholars brought it to the city of al-Shamâsiyya in the region of Damascus in the Sham in the year 214 AH (829 AD). Through their observations they determined the exact duration of a solar year as well as the inclination of the sun, the exit of its center and the situation of its various faces, which allowed them to know the state and positions of the other planets. Then the death of the caliph al-Ma’mûn in 218 A.H. (833) put an end to this project, but they nevertheless completed the astronomical telescope and named it ‘the Ma’mûn telescope’”

Now, let me present you a short list of the main astronomers, mathematicians, thinkers, scholars and translators who frequented the Houses of Wisdom:

Al-Jahiz (776-867). The encyclopedic approach of this Mutazilite is conceived as « a necklace gathering pearls » or as a garden which, with its plants, its harmonious organization and its fountains, represents in miniature the whole universe. He sketches the principle of the evolution of species;

Al-Khwarizmi (780-850), (in Latin Algorithmus). This Persian mathematician and astronomer, according to some a Zoroastrian converted to Islam, would have been a follower of mutazilism. He is best known for having invented the method of solving mathematical problems, which is still used today and which is called algorithm. He studied for some time in Baghdad but it is also reported that he made a trip to India. Al Khawarizmi invented the word algebra (from the Arabic word j-b-r, meaning force, beat or multiply), introduced the Indian numerical system to the Muslim world, institutionalized the decimal system in mathematics, and formalized the testing of scientific hypotheses based on observations;

Sahl Rabban al-Tabari (786-845), a Jewish astronomer and physician whose name means “The son of the rabbi of Tabaristan”. His son Ali was the tutor of al-Razi (865-925). An alchemist who became a physician, he is said to have isolated sulfuric acid and ethanol and was among the first to advocate their medical use. He greatly influenced the conception of hospital organization in connection with the training of future doctors. He was the object of much criticism for his opposition to Aristotelianism;

Al-Hajjaj (786-823) made the first Arabic translation of Euclid’s Elements from Greek. He also translated Ptolemy’s Almagest;

Al-Kindi (801-873) (known as Alkindus), considered the father of Arab philosophy, was a mutazilist. He was a prolific author (about 260 books) and explored all fields: geometry, philosophy, medicine, astronomy, physics, arithmetic, logic, music and psychology. Along with his colleagues, Al-Kindi was entrusted with the translation of the manuscripts of Greek scholars. After the death of Al-Ma’mun in 833, he was considered too much of a mutazilist, fell into disgrace and his library was confiscated;

The Banu Musa (“children of Moses”) brothers, three brilliant sons of a deceased astrologer, friend of the Caliph. Mohammed will work on astronomy; Ahmed and Hassan on the canals linking the Euphrates to the Tigris, a guarantee of the control and optimization of their respective floods. They published the Book of Ingenious Mechanisms, an inventory of new techniques and machines [*14];

Hunayn ibn Ishâk (808-873) (known as Iohannitius). This Nestorian Christian was entrusted by Al-Ma’mun with the task of overseeing the quality of translations; a physician, he translated some of the works of the Greek physician Claudius Galen;

Thabit ibn Qurra (836-901), a Syrian astronomer, mathematician, philosopher and musicologist;

Qusta ibn Luqa (820-912), a Greek Byzantine physician, also a philosopher, mathematician, astronomer, naturalist and translator. A Christian of the Melkite Church, he spoke both Greek (his mother tongue) and Arabic, as well as Syriac. Considered, along with Hunayn ibn Ishaq, as one of the key figures in the transmission of Greek knowledge from Antiquity to the Arab-Muslim world. He was the translator of Aristarchus of Samos for whom the Earth revolved around the Sun and the author of a treatise on the astrolabe;

Ibn Sahl (940-1000), in the footsteps of Al-Kindi, wrote a treatise on burning mirrors and lenses around 984, explaining how they can focus light on a point. His work was perfected by Ibn Al-Haytam (965-1040) (Latin name: Alhazen), whose writings reached as far as Leonardo da Vinci, via the Commentaries of Ghiberti. In Ibn-Sahl, we find the first mention of the law of refraction, later rediscovered in Europe as the law of Snell-Descartes.

Drawn into Bagdad for the opportunities it offered, these scholars generally worked in teams in a totally interdisciplinary spirit. Al-Ma’mûn, monitoring the science projets and noting the contradictions that arose from the translations of Greek, Persian and Indian sources, fixed with the scholars the next great scientific challenges to be met:

–To obtain, thanks to more efficient astronomical observatories, tables of astronomical ephemerides [*15] of greater precision than those of Ptolemy;
–To calculate with precision the circumference of the Earth with more advanced methods than those of the Greek astronomer Eratosthenes (3rd century BC);
–Produce a world map integrating the latest geographical knowledge concerning the distances between cities and the size of the continents;
–Deciphering the Egyptian hieroglyphs that Al-Ma’mûn had discovered during his trip to Egypt.

Translations of Plato

Socrates and his Students, illustration from ‘Kitab Mukhtar al-Hikam wa-Mahasin al-Kilam’ by Al-Mubashir, Turkish School, (13th c).

By asserting that what had advanced science at this period was the rediscovery of Aristotle and his purely empiricist method, one forgets the rediscovery of Plato, whose dialectical and hypothetical method has often done more for science than blind empiricism.

Al-Kindi’s intense involvement in the Platonic tradition is reflected in his summaries of the Apology and the Crito, and in his own works that paraphrase the Phaedo or are inspired by the Meno and the Symposium. The Syrian scientist Ibn al-Bitriq, a member of Al-Kindi’s “circle” in Bagdad, translated the Timaeus.

Otherwise, the House of Wisdom’s top translator, Hunayn ibn Ishaq and his circle translated the Greek physician Claudius Galen’s commentaries on the Timaeus, especially his On what Plato said in the Timaeus in a medical way and his On the doctrines of Hippocrates and Plato. And from Hunayn’s own works, we know that some of his students translated Galen’s lost Greek summaries of Plato’s Cratylus, Sophist, Parmenides, Euthydemus, Republic and Laws. Finally, the physician al-Razi presented and commented on Plutarch’s treatise On the Generation of the Soul in the Timaeus.

Inter-religious dialogue:
possible for some, complicated for others

In the West, the name of Al-Kindi is best known in association with The Apology of Al-Kindi, an anonymous text of the time. It is probably a fictitious dialogue between two believers, one Muslim (Abdallah Al-Hashimi), the other Christian (Al-Kindi), both criticizing the other’s and praising one’s own religion and inviting the other to join him! This dialogue supposedly took place at the time of the caliph Al-Ma’mûn. What we know about the open-mindedness of the Caliph does not contradict this assertion. The earliest known mention of the existence of this Apology came to us from Al-Biruni (973-1048).

The manuscript of Al-Kindi’s Apology was translated into Latin in 1142 at the request of Peter the Venerable (1092-1156), grand abbot of the abbey of Cluny, the most powerful and important in Latin Europe. That same year, after visiting Toledo, he conceived the idea of a systematic refutation of the Muslim religion, which he considered heretical and errant.

Here is how he explains the translation he has just ordered of the Koran (the Lex Mahumet pseudoprophete) by a team of translators (including an Arab) brought together for the occasion:

Whether one gives the Mohammedan error the shameful name of heresy or the infamous one of paganism, one must act against it, that is, write. But the Latins and especially the moderns, the ancient culture perishing, according to the word of the Jews who once admired the polyglot apostles, do not know any other language than that of their native land. So they could neither recognize the enormity of this error nor stop it. So my heart was inflamed and a fire burned in my meditation. I was indignant that the Latins did not know the cause of such a perdition and their ignorance robbed them of the power to resist it; for no one answered, for no one knew. So I went to find specialists in the Arabic language which has allowed this deadly poison to infest more than half the globe. I persuaded them, by dint of prayers and money, to translate from Arabic into Latin the history and doctrine of this wretched man and his very law, which is called Koran”.

Accused hence “the Arabic language which allowed this deadly poison (Islam) to infest more than half of the globe”…

This declaration of war was undoubtedly required to motivate his troops. Let us recall that Eudes de Châtillon, the grand prior of the abbey of Cluny, who will become Pope Urban II in 1088, will be, in 1095, at the origin of the first crusade sending the bandits who ravaged France, to go and wage war elsewhere.

The decline and Al-Ghazali

Aristotle trying to explain the astrolab to his pupils. Miniature from The best rulings and the most precious sayings of Al-Moubachir, Arabic manuscript, 13th Century. Istanbul.

Let us return to the Abbasids. As we have said, with the arrival in power of Al-Mutawakkil in 847, mutazilism was removed from power and the Houses of Wisdom were reduced to simple libraries. This did not prevent a traveller, describing his visit to Baghdad in 891, from reporting that the city contained more than one hundred public libraries. Following the Bayt Al-Hikma model, small libraries were founded on every street corner of the city…

Entangled in endless theological debates between experts and won by sectarianism, the mutazilist elite cut itself off from a people who were losing confidence and eventually welcomed with a sense of relief the obscurantist doctrine of Al-Ghâzalî (1058-1111) (Latin name: Algazel), the worst enemy of the mutazilites.

Al-Ghâzalî proposed a radical solution: philosophy is only right when it agrees with religion – which, according to Al-Ghâzalî, is rare. This leads him to radicalize his position, and to attack more and more the Greco-Arab philosophy, guilty, in his eyes, of blasphemy.

Where someone like the Persian Ibn Sina (980-1037) (Latin name: Avicenna), author of the Canons or Precepts of Medicine (around 1020), crossed Greek philosophy and Muslim religion, Al-Ghazali wanted to filter the first through the second.

Hence his most famous and important work, The Incoherence of the Philosophers, written in 1095. In it, he denounces the “pride” of the philosophers who claim to “rewrite the Koran” through Plato and Aristotle. Their error is above all a logical one, as the title of the book itself indicates, which underlines their “incoherence”: they want to complete the Koran with Greek philosophy, whereas the Koran comes later in history and therefore does not need to be completed. He therefore promotes a much more literal approach to the Koranic text, whereas Ibn Sina defended, cautiously it is true, a metaphorical approach. In truth, it is Aristotelianism and nominalism that triumph.

From the eleventh century onward, the Abbasid, whose Empire was fragmenting, called upon the Turkish Seljuk princes to protect them against the Shiites, supported by the Fatimid caliphate of Cairo. Gradually, the Turkish and Mongol troops, coming from Central Asia, ended up governing the security of the Abbasid caliph while letting him exercise his religious power.

Then, in 1258, they deposed the last caliph and confiscated his title of successor of the Prophet, which gave them religious power over the four schools of Sunnism. In order to subdue the Arab and Persian populations, the Seljuk Turks created the madrasa (Koranic school) where the conservative doctrine of Acharite Sunnism was taught to the exclusion of the dialectical Mutazilite theology, considered an ideological threat to Turkish authority over the Arabs.

The Abbasid Empire declined as a result of administrative negligence, abandonment of canal maintenance, flood-induced famine, social injustice, slave revolts, and religious tensions between Shiites and Sunnis. At the end of the 9th century, the Zendj, black slaves (from Zanzibar) who worked in the marshes of the lower Iraq, revolted several times, even occupying Basra and threatening Baghdad. The Caliph restored order at the cost of an unprecedentedly violent repression. The rebels were only crushed in 883 at the cost of many victims. The empire did not recover.

In 1019, the Caliph forbade any new interpretation of the Koran, radically opposing the Mutazilite school. This is a brutal stop to the development of critical thinking and intellectual and scientific innovations in the Arab Empire, the consequences of which are still felt today.

ASTRONOMY

Since the dawn of time (it is the case to say it), man has tried to understand the organization of the stars in the environment near the Earth.

Installations such as Stonehenge (2800 BC) in England allowed the first observers to identify the cycles that determine the place and the exact day when certain stars rise. All these observations posed paradoxes: around us, the earth appears relatively flat, but the Moon or the Sun that we perceive with the same eyes seem spherical. The Sun « rises » and « sets », our senses tell us, but where is the reality?

It seems that Thales of Miletus (625-547 BC) was the first to have really wondered about the shape of the Earth. He thought that the Earth was shaped like a flat disk on a vast expanse of water. Then Pythagoras and Plato imagined a spherical shape, which they considered more beautiful and rational. Finally Aristotle reported some observational evidence such as the rounded shape of the Earth’s shadow on the Moon during eclipses.

The Greek scientist Eratosthenes (276 BC- 194 BC), chief librarian of the Alexandria library, then calculated the Earth’s circumference. He had noticed that at noon, on the day of the summer solstice, there was no shadow on the side of Aswan. By measuring the shadow of a stick planted in Alexandria at the same time and knowing the distance between the two cities, he deduced the circumference of the Earth with a rather astonishing accuracy: 39,375 kilometers against some 40,000 kilometers for current estimates.

Between Ptolemy’s Almagest and Copernicus’ De Revolutionibus, as we have said, Arabic astronomy constitutes “the missing link”.

The original title of Ptolemy’s work is The Mathematical Composition. The Arabs, very impressed by this work, called it “megiste”, from the Greek meaning “very great”, to which they added the Arabic article “al”, to give “al megiste” which became Almageste.

It is important to know that Ptolemy never had the opportunity to re-read his treatise as a whole. After writing the first of the thirteen books of his work, the one on “The Fundamental Postulates of Astronomy”, Ptolemy passed it on to copyists who reproduced it and distributed it widely without waiting for the completion of the other twelve books…

Astrolabe made of brass by mathematician Ibrahim ibn Sa’id al-Shali. It is dated in the year 459 of the Hegira, corresponding to 1067 and was built in a Toledo workshop.

In the end, confronted with observations that called into question his own observations and in order to rectify his errors, Ptolemy wrote another work, after the Almagest, entitled Planetary Hypotheses. The author returned to the models presented in the Almagest while making modifications to the average motions (of the planets) to take into account the latest observations. However, his Planetary Hypotheses went beyond the mathematical model of the Almagest to present a physical realization of the universe as a set of nested spheres, in which he used the epicycles of his planetary model to calculate the dimensions of the universe. Finally, the Almagest also contains a description of 1022 stars grouped into 48 constellations.

Ptolemy also presents stereographic projection invented by Hipparchus, the theoretical basis for the construction of the astrolabe by Arab astronomers.

In the ninth century, when the Arabs became interested in astronomy, knowledge was based on the following principles summarized in the work of Ptolemy:

–Ignoring the assertions of Aristarchus of Samos (310-230 BC) for whom the Earth revolved around the Sun, Ptolemy resumed in the second century AD the thesis of Eudoxus of Cnidus (approx. 400-355 BC) and especially Hipparchus (180 to 125 BC) to assert that the Earth is a motionless sphere placed at the center of the world (geocentrism);

–Ptolemy agreed with Plato, who was inspired by Pythagoras, that the circle was the only perfect form, and that the other bodies turning around the Earth did so according to circular and uniform trajectories (without acceleration or deceleration);

–Yet everyone knew that some planets do not follow these perfect rules. In the 6th century, the neo-Platonic philosopher Simplicius, in his Commentary on Aristotle’s Physics, wrote: “Plato then poses this problem to the mathematicians: what are the uniform and perfectly regular circular motions that should be taken as hypotheses, so that we can save the appearances that the wandering stars present?” ;

–In order to account for the « apparent retrograde motion » of Mars, Hipparchus will introduce other secondary perfect figures, again circles. The articulation and interaction of these “epicycles” gave the appearance of sticking with the observed facts. Ptolemy took up this approach;

–However, the more the precision of astronomical measurements improved, the more anomalies were discovered and the more it was necessary to multiply these interlocking “epicycles”. It quickly became very complicated and inextricable;

–The universe is divided into a sub-lunar region where everything is created and therefore perishable, and the rest of the universe, supra-lunar, which is imperishable and eternal.

Hipparchus of Nicea

Ptolemy’s Almagest in arab with figures of Hipparchus epicycles.

The Arab astronomers, for both religious and intellectual reasons that we mentioned at the beginning of this article, initially discovered and then, on the basis of increasingly detailed observations, challenged Hipparchus’ hypotheses, which were the basis of the Ptolemaic model.

Hipparchus imagined a system of coordinates for the stars based on longitudes and latitudes. We also owe him the use of parallels and meridians to locate the Earth as well as the division of the circumference into 360° inherited from the sexagesimal calculation (base 60) of the Babylonians.

In astronomy, his works on the rotation of the Earth and the planets are numerous. Hipparchus explains the mechanism of the seasons by noting the obliquity of the ecliptic: the inclination of the Earth’s axis of rotation. By comparing his observations with older ones, he discovered the precession of the equinoxes due to this tilt: the Earth’s axis of rotation makes a conical movement from East to West and of revolution 26,000 years. Thus in a few millennia, the North Pole will no longer be found with the North Star (Polaris) but with another star, Vega.

Based on Hipparchus, the Arabs perfected and fabricated an important instrument for measuring positions: the astrolabe. This “mathematical jewel” allows to measure the position of stars, planets, to know the time on Earth. Later, the astrolabe was replaced by more precise and easier to use instruments, such as the quadrant, the sextant or the octant.

With the manuscripts at their disposal in the Houses of Wisdom and the observatories of Baghdad and Damascus, the Arab astronomers had texts of an incredible richness but often in flagrant contradiction with their own observations of the movements of the Moon and the Sun. It is from this confrontation that later discoveries were born. The Arabs introduced a lot of mathematics to solve problems, especially trigonometry and algebra.

The Arab astronomers

In order to present the main Arab astronomers and their contributions, here is an excerpt from J. P. Maratray’s remarkable article L’astronomie arabe.

Al-Khwarizmi (783-850) called Algorithmi.
A mathematician, geographer and astronomer of Persian origin, he was a member of the « House of Wisdom ». He is one of the founders of Arab mathematics, inspired by Indian knowledge, in particular the decimal system, fractions, square roots… He is credited with the term “algorithm”. Algorithms are known since antiquity, and the name of Al-Khwarizmi (Algorithmi in Latin) will be given to these sequences of repeated elementary operations. He is also the author of the term “algebra”, which is the title of one of his works on the subject. He was also the first to use the letter x to designate an unknown in an equation. He wrote the first book of algebra (al-jabr) in which he described a systematic method of solving second degree equations and proposed a classification of these equations. He introduced the use of numbers that we still use today. These “Arabic” numbers are in fact of Indian origin, but were used mathematically by Al-Khwarizmi. He adopted the use of the zero, invented by the Indians in the 5th century, and adopted by the Arabs through him. The Arabs will translate the Indian word “sunya” by “as-sifr”, which becomes “ziffer” and “zephiro”. Ziffer will give “number”, and zephiro, “zero”. Al-Khwarizmi established astronomical tables (position of the five planets, the Sun and the Moon) based on Hindu and Greek astronomy. He studied the position and visibility of the Moon and its eclipses, the Sun and the planets. It is the first completely Arabic astronomical work. A crater of the Moon bears his name.

Al-Farghani (805-880) called Alfraganus (mentioned in Dante’s Commedia).
Born in Ferghana in present-day Uzbekistan, he wrote in 833 the Elements of Astronomy, based on the Greek knowledge of Ptolemy. He was one of the most remarkable astronomers in the service of Al-Ma’mûn, and a member of the House of Wisdom. He introduced new ideas, such as the fact that the precession of the equinoxes must affect the position of the planets, and not only that of the stars. His work was translated into Latin in the 12th century, and had a great impact on the very closed circles of Western European astronomers. He determined the diameter of the Earth, which he estimated at 10500 km. We also owe him a work on sundials and another on the astrolabe.

Al-Battani (850-929) called Albatenius.
He observed the sky from Syria. He is sometimes called “the Ptolemy of the Arabs”. His measurements are remarkably accurate. He determined the length of the solar year, the value of the precession of the equinoxes, the inclination of the ecliptic. He noted that the eccentricity of the Sun is variable, without going so far as to interpret this phenomenon as an elliptical trajectory. He wrote a catalog of 489 stars. We owe him the first use of trigonometry in the study of the sky. It is a much more powerful method than the geometrical one of Ptolemy. His main work is The Book of Tables. It is composed of 57 chapters. Translated into Latin in 1116 by Plato of Tivoli, it will greatly influence the European astronomers of the Renaissance.

Al-Soufi (903-986) known as Azophi.
Persian astronomer, he translated Greek works including the Almagest and improved the estimates of the magnitudes of stars. In 964, he published « The Book of Fixed Stars », where he drew constellations. He seems to have been the first to report an observation of the large Magellanic cloud (a nebula), visible in Yemen, but not in Isfahan. Similarly, we owe him a first representation of the Andromeda galaxy, probably already observed before him. He described it as « a small cloud » in the mouth of the Arabian constellation of the Great Fish. Its name (Azophi) was given to a crater on the Moon.

Al-Khujandi (circa 940- circa 1000).
He was a Persian astronomer and mathematician. He built an observatory in Ray, near Tehran, with a huge sextant, constructed in 994. It is the first instrument able to measure angles more precise than the minute of angle. He measures with this instrument the obliquity of the ecliptic, by observing the meridian passages of the Sun. He found 23° 32′ 19 ». Ptolemy found 23° 51′, and the Indians, much earlier, 24°. The idea of the natural variation of this angle never occurred to the Arabs. They discussed for a long time about the accuracy of the measurements, which made their science advance.

Ibn Al-Haytam (965-1039) called Alhazen.
A mathematician and optician born in Basra in present-day Iraq, he was asked by the Egyptian authorities to solve the problem of the Nile floods. His solution was the construction of a dam towards Aswan. He gave up in front of the enormity of the task (the dam was finally built in 1970!). Faced with this “failure”, he feigned madness until the death of his boss. He made a critical assessment of Ptolemy’s theses and those of his predecessors, and wrote Doubts on Ptolemy. He draws up a catalog of the inconsistencies, without however proposing an alternative solution. Among the inconsistencies he noted were the variation in the apparent diameter of the Moon and the Sun, the non-uniformity of the allegedly circular motions, the variation in the position of the planets in latitude, the organization of the Greek spheres. Observing that the Milky Way has no parallax, he placed it very far from the Earth, in any case further away than Aristotle’s sub-lunar sphere. Despite his doubts, he maintains the central place of the Earth in the universe. Ibn Al-Haytam takes up the work of Greek scholars, from Euclid to Ptolemy, for whom the notion of light is closely linked to the notion of vision: the main question being whether the eye has a passive role in this process or whether it sends a kind of fluid to “interrogate” the object. Through his studies of the mechanism of vision, Ibn Al-Haytam showed that the two eyes were an optical instrument, and that they actually saw two separate images. If the eye sent this fluid, one could see at night, he speculated. He understood that the sunlight reflected off the objects and then entered the eye. But for him, the image is formed on the lens… He took up Ptolemy’s ideas on the rectilinear propagation of light, accepted the laws of reflection on a mirror, and sensed that light has a finite, but very great speed. He studied refraction, the deviation of a light ray as it passes from one medium to another, and predicted a change in the speed of light as it passes. But he could never calculate the angle of refraction. He found that the phenomenon of twilight is related to the refraction of sunlight in the atmosphere, which he tried to measure the height, without success. Already known in antiquity, we owe him a very precise description and the use for experimental purposes of the dark room (camera obscura), a black room that projects an image on a wall through a small hole drilled in the opposite wall. The result of all this optical research is recorded in his Treatise on Optics, which took him six years to write and was translated into Latin in 1270. [*16] In mechanics, he asserted that an object in motion continues to move as long as no force stops it. This is the principle of inertia before the letter. An asteroid bears his name: 59239 Alhazen.

Al-Biruni (973-1048).
Certainly one of the greatest scholars of medieval Islam, originally from Persia, he was interested in astronomy, geography, history, medicine and mathematics, and philosophy in general. He wrote more than 100 works. He was also a tax collector and a great traveler, especially in India, where he studied language, religion and science. At the age of 17, he calculated the latitude of his native town of Kath (in Persia, now in Uzbekistan). At the age of 22, he had already written several short works, including one on cartography. In astronomy, he observed the eclipses of the Moon and the Sun. He is one of the first to evaluate the errors on his measurements and those of his predecessors. He noticed a difference between the average speed and the apparent speed of a star. He measured the radius of the Earth at 6339.6 km (the correct figure is 6378 km), a result used in Europe in the 16th century. During his travels, he met Indian astronomers who supported heliocentrism and the rotation of the Earth on its axis. He will always be skeptical, because this theory implies the movement of the Earth. But he will ask himself the question: « Here is a problem difficult to solve and to refute ». He believes that this theory does not lead to any mathematical problems. He refuted astrology, arguing that this discipline is more conjectural than experimental. In mathematics, he developed the calculation of proportions (rule of three), demonstrated that the ratio of the circumference of a circle to its diameter is irrational (future number Pi), calculated trigonometric tables, and developed methods of geodesic triangulations.

Ali Ibn Ridwan (988-1061).
Egyptian astronomer and astrologer, he wrote several astronomical and astrological works, including a commentary on another book of Claudius Ptolemy, the Tetrabible. He observed and commented on a supernova (SN 1006), probably the brightest in history. Its magnitude is estimated today, according to the testimonies that have come down to us, at -7.5! It remained visible for more than a year. He explains that this new star had two to three times the apparent diameter of Venus, a quarter of the brightness of the Moon, and that it was low on the southern horizon. Other western observations corroborate this description, and place it in the constellation of the Wolf.

From the 11th to the 16th century.
After a first phase, more important observatories were built. The first of them, model of the following ones, is that of Maragheh, in the current Iran. Their purpose was to establish planetary models and to understand the movement of the stars. (…) The school thus constituted will have its apogee with Ibn Al-Shâtir (1304-1375). Other observatories will follow, such as the one in Samarkand in the 15th century, Istanbul in the early 16th century, and, in the West, the one of Tycho Brahe in Uraniborg (Denmark at that time) at the end of the 16th century. The new models were no longer Ptolemaic inspired, but remained geocentric. The physics of the time still refused to put the Earth in motion and to remove it from the center of the world. These models were inspired by the Greek epicycles, keeping the circles, but simplifying them. For example, Al-Tûsî proposes a system comprising a circle rolling inside another circle of double radius. This system transforms two circular motions into an alternating rectilinear motion, and explains the variations of the latitude of the planets. Moreover, it accounts for the variations of the apparent diameters of the stars. But to go further, it will be necessary to change the reference system, which the Arabs refused to do. This change will occur with the Copernican revolution, during the Renaissance, in which the Earth loses its status as the center of the world.

Al-Zarqali (1029-1087) said Arzachel.
Mathematician, astronomer and geographer born in Toledo, Spain, he discussed the possibility of the movement of the Earth. Like others, his writings will be known to Europeans of the sixteenth and seventeenth century. He designed astrolabes, and established the Toledo Tables, which were used by the great Western navigators such as Christopher Columbus, and served as a basis for the Alphonsine Tables. He established that the eccentricity of the Sun varies, more precisely that the center of the circle on which the Sun rotates moves periodically away from or towards the Earth. A crater of the Moon bears his name, as well as a bridge of Toledo on the Tagus.

Omar Al-Khayyam (1048-1131).
Known for his poetry, he was also interested in astronomy and mathematics. He became director of the Isfahan observatory in 1074. He created new astronomical tables even more precise, and determined the duration of the solar year with great accuracy, given the instruments used. It is more accurate than the Gregorian year, created five centuries later in Europe. He reformed the Persian calendar by introducing a leap year (Djelalean reform). In mathematics, he was interested in third degree equations by demonstrating that they can have several solutions (he found some of them geometrically). He wrote several texts on the extraction of the cubic roots, and a treaty of algebra.

Al-Tûsî (1201-1274).
Astronomer and mathematician, born in the city of Tus in present-day Iran, he built and directed the observatory of Maragheh. He studied the works of Al-Khayyam on proportions, and was interested in geometry. On the astronomical side, he commented on the Almagest and completed it, like several astronomers (Al-Battani…) before him. He estimates the obliquity of the ecliptic at 23°30′.

Al-Kashi (1380-1439).
Persian mathematician and astronomer, he witnessed a lunar eclipse in 1406 and wrote several astronomical works afterwards. He spent the rest of his life in Samarkand, under the protection of Prince Ulugh Beg (1394-1449) who founded a university there. He became the first director of the new observatory of Samarkand. His astronomical tables propose values with 4 (5 according to the sources) digits in sexagesimal notation of the sine function. He gives the way to pass from a system of coordinates to another. His catalog contains 1018 stars. He improves the tables of eclipses and visibility of the Moon. In his treatise on the circle, he obtained an approximate value of Pi with 9 exact positions in sexagesimal notation, that is to say 16 exact decimals! A record, since the next improvement of the estimation of Pi dates from the 16th century with 20 decimals. He leaves his name to a generalization of the Pythagorean theorem to any triangles. This is the Al-Kashi theorem. He introduced the decimal fractions, and acquired a great reputation which made him the last great Arab mathematician astronomer, before the West took over.

Ulugh Beg (1394-1449).
Grandson of Tamerlan, prince of the Timurid (descendants of Tamerlan). Viceroy from 1410, he acceded to the throne in 1447. He was a remarkable scholar and a poor politician, a position he delegated to devote himself to science. His teacher was Qadi Zada al-Rumi (1364-1436) who developed in him a taste for mathematics and astronomy. He built several schools, including one in Samarkand in 1420 where he taught, and an observatory in 1429. He worked there with some 70 mathematicians and astronomers (including Al-Kashi) to write the Sultanian Tables published in 1437 and improved by Ulugh Beg himself shortly before his death in 1449. The accuracy of these tables will remain unequaled for more than 200 years, and they were used in the West. They contain the positions of more than 1000 stars. Their first translation dates from around 1500, and was made in Venice.

Taqi Al-Din (1526-1585).
After a period as a theologian, he became the official astronomer of the Sultan in Istanbul. He built an observatory there with the aim of competing with those of European countries, including that of Tycho Brahe. The observatory was opened in 1577. He drew up the Zij tables (“the unbroken pearl”). He was the first to use comma notation, rather than the traditional sexagesimal fractions in use. He observed and described a comet, and predicted that it was a sign of victory for the Ottoman army. This forecast turns out to be erronous, and the observatory is destroyed in 1580… He then devotes himself to mechanics, and describes the functioning of a rudimentary steam engine, invents a water pump, and is fascinated by clocks and optics.

The destruction of the observatory of Istanbul marks the end of the Arab astronomical activity of the Middle Ages. It was not until the Copernican revolution that new progress was made, and what progress! Copernicus and his successors were certainly strongly inspired by the results of the Arabs through their works. Travel and direct contact between scientists of the time were rare. Since Westerners did not understand Arabic, Latin translations probably influenced the West, along with the works of some Greek philosophers who had questioned the central position of the Earth, as Aristarchus of Samos had proposed around 280 BC.

Arab observatories

Scale model of the giant sextant constructed inside the Maragheh observatory (1259).

The modern observatory, in its conception, is a worthy successor of the Arab observatories of the late Middle Ages. Unlike the private observatories of the Greek philosophers, the Islamic observatory is a specialized astronomical institution, with its own premises, scientific staff, teamwork with observers and theoreticians, a director and study programs. They have recourse, as today, to increasingly large instruments, in order to constantly improve the accuracy of measurements.

The first of these observatories was built during the reign of Al-Ma’mûn in Bagdad in the 9th century. We have already mentioned the observatory of Ray, near Tehran and second city of the Abbasid Empire after Baghdad, with its monumental wall sextant dating from 994. To these must be added the observatories of Toledo and Cordoba in Spain, Baghdad and Isfahan.

Finally, the one in Maragheh in the north of present-day Iran, built in 1259 with funds collected to maintain hospitals and mosques. Al-Tusi worked there. Then came the era of the observatory of Samarkand, built in 1420 by the astronomer Ulugh Beg (1394-1449), whose remains were found in 1908 by a Russian team.

Today’s museum in Maragheh, Iran.

Conclusion

Mongol siege of Bagdad of 1258

Much more than the crusades, it will be the Mongol offensives that will devastate entire sections of the Arab-Muslim civilization. Genghis Khan (1155-1227), to the great pleasure of some Westerners, will destroy the Muslim kingdoms of Khwarezm (1218) and Sogdia with Bukhara and Samarkand (1220). The great city of Merv in 1221. In 1238, his son will seize Moscow, then Kiev. In 1240, Poland and Hungary will be invaded. In 1241, Vienna was threatened.

Before bringing down the Song Dynasty in China in 1273, the Mongols turned against the Abbassid.

Hence, the Houses of Wisdom came to a brutal end on February 12, 1258 with the Mongol invasion of Baghdad led by Hulagu (Genghis Khan’s grandson), who killed the last Abbasid caliph Al-Mu’tassim (despite his surrender) and destroyed the city of Baghdad and its cultural heritage. Hulagu also ordered the massacre of the caliph’s entire family and entourage.

Mutazilism was banned and the magnificent collection of books and manuscripts in the House of Wisdom in Baghdad was thrown into the muddy water of the Tigris, which turned brown for a few days because of the inked papers of the books and manuscripts.

One report says that the Mongols exterminated twenty-four thousand scholars and an incalculable number of books were lost. Of Mutazilism, its doctrine was only known through the texts of the traditionalist theologians who had attacked it. It was only the discovery of the voluminous works of Abdel al Jabbar Ibn Ahmad in the 19th century that made it possible to understand the key role played my this current of thought in the Arab renaissance and the formation of current Muslim theology, whether Sunni or Shiite.

Closer to home, the Iraq war of 2003: until then, Iraq was the world’s largest publisher of scientific publications in Arabic. As a result of the chaos caused by a war waged in the name of “democracy” and “the war on terror”, both the National Library and the National Archives were looted and burned. The same happened to the Central Library of Pious Legacies, the Library of the Iraqi University of Sciences, as well as many public libraries in Baghdad, Mosul and Basra. The same was true for the archaeological treasures of the Iraqi Museum and its library. It seems that some people have declared war on civilization.

British troops entering Bagdad in 1917.

NOTES:

  1. A theodicy or « righteousness of God ») is an explanation of the apparent contradiction between the existence of evil and two characteristics peculiar to God: his omnipotence and his goodness.
  2. Sumer. The natural environment of the Sumerian country was not really favorable to the development of a productive agriculture: poor soils with a high content of salts harmful to the growth of plants, very high average temperatures, insignificant rainfall, and flooding of rivers coming in the spring, at harvest time, and not in the fall when the seeds need them to germinate, as is the case in Egypt. It was therefore the ingenuity and relentless labor of Mesopotamian farmers that enabled this country to become one of the granaries of the ancient Middle East. From the 6th millennium BC, the peasant communities developed an irrigation system which gradually branched out to cover a large area, thereby taking advantage of the advantage offered to them by the extremely flat relief of the Mesopotamian delta, where there was no no natural obstacle to the extension of the irrigation canals over tens of kilometers. By regulating the level of water derived from natural watercourses to adapt it to the needs of crops, and by developing techniques aimed at limiting soil salinization (leaching of fields, practice of fallow), it was possible to obtain very high cereal yields.
  3. Khorassan is a region located in northeastern Iran. The name comes from the Persian and means « where does the sun come from ». It was given to the eastern part of the Sassanid Empire. Khorassan is also considered the medieval name of Afghanistan by Afghans. Indeed, this territory included present-day Afghanistan, as well as southern Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan and Tajikistan.
  4. In the 10th century, the Persian medical scholar Mohammad Al-Razi describes the distillation of petroleum to obtain kerosene or « illuminating petroleum » in his Book of Secrets.
  5. Sanskrit is a language of India, among the oldest known Indo-European languages ​​(older even than Latin and Greek). It is notably the language of Hindu religious texts and, as such, it continues to be used as a cultural language, like Latin in centuries past in the West.
  6. Peshlevi or Middle Persian is an Iranian language that was spoken during the Sassanid era. She descends from Old Persian. Middle Persian was usually written using the Pahlevi script. The language was also written using the Manichean script by the Manichaeans of Persia.
  7. Abu Muhammad al – Qasim ibn ’Ali al – Hariri (1054–1122), Arab man of letters, poet and philologist, was born near Basra, in present-day Iraq. He is known for his Oaths and his maqâmât (literally fashions, often translated as assemblies or sessions), a collection of 50 short stories combining social and moral commentary with the brilliant expressions of the Arabic language. If the genre of maqâma was created by Badi’al – Zaman al – Hamadhani (969–1008), it is the sessions of al – Hariri that best define it. Written in a rhyming prose style called saj ’and interwoven with exquisite verse, the stories are meant to be entertaining and educational. Each of the anecdotes takes place in a different city in the Muslim world during the time of al – Hariri. They tell of an encounter, usually at a gathering of townspeople, between two fictional characters: the narrator al – Harith ibn Hammam and the protagonist Abu Zayd al-Saruji. Over the centuries, the work has been copied and commented on many times, but only 13 copies still in existence today have illuminations illustrating scenes from the stories. The manuscript presented here, executed in 1237, was both copied and illustrated by Yahya ibn Mahmud al-Wasiti, often considered the first Arab artist. It contains 99 miniatures of exceptional quality. No other known copy contains so much. The miniatures, recognized for their striking depiction of Muslim life in the 13th century, are considered to be the earliest Arab paintings created by an artist whose identity is known. Al – Wasiti, founder of the Baghdad School of Illumination, was also a remarkable calligrapher, as evidenced by his fine Naskhi style. The almost immediate popularity of the maqâmât reached Arab Spain, where Rabbi Judah al-Harizi (1165-c. 1225) translated the sessions into Hebrew under the title Mahberoth Itiel and subsequently composed his own Tahkemoni, or Hebrew sessions. . The work was also translated into many modern languages.
  8. The Barmecids or Barmakids are members of a Persian nobility family originally from Balkh in Bactria (north of Afghanistan). This family of Buddhist religious (paramaka means in Sanskrit the superior of a Buddhist monastery) who became Zoroastrians and then converted to Islam provided many viziers to the Abbasid caliphs. The Barmakids had acquired a remarkable reputation as patrons and are regarded as the main instigators of the brilliant culture which then developed in Baghdad.
  9. The Christological thesis of Nestorius (born c. 381 – died 451), Patriarch of Constantinople (428-431), was declared a heretic and condemned by the Council of Ephesus. For Nestorius, two hypostases, one divine, the other human, coexist in Jesus Christ. From the Eastern Church, Nestorianism was one of the historically most influential forms of Christianity in the world throughout late Antiquity and the Middle Ages, to India, China and Mongolia.
  10. Syriac (a form of Aramaic, the language of Christ) is alongside Latin and Greek the third component of ancient Christianity, rooted in Hellenism but also descended from Near Eastern and Semitic antiquity. From the first centuries, in a movement symmetrical to that of the Greco-Latin Christian tradition towards the west, Syriac Christianity developed towards the east, as far as India and China. Syriac is still today the liturgical and classical language (a bit like Latin in Europe) of the Syriac Orthodox, Syriac Catholic, Assyrian, Chaldean and Maronite Churches in Lebanon, Syria, Iraq and South India. Where is. Finally, it is the branch of Christianity most in contact with Islam in which he continued to live.
  11. In South-West Asia, the Greek influence remained alive in several cities under Christian influence: Edessa (now Urfa in Turkey), at the time capital of the county of Edessa, one of the first Eastern Latin states, the closest to the Islamic world; Antioch (now Antakya in Turkey); Nisibe (now Nusaybin in Turkey); Al-Mada’in (ie “The Cities”), an Iraqi metropolis on the Tigris, between the royal cities of Ctesiphon and Seleucia on the Tigris and Gondichapour (now in Iran) whose ruins remain. To this must be added the cities of Latakia (in Syria) and Amed (today Diyarbakir in Turkey) where there were Jacobite centers (Christians of the East, but members of the Syriac Orthodox Church, not to be confused with the Nestorians).
  12. The Gondishapour Academy was located in present-day Khuzestan province in southwestern Iran, near the Karoun River. It offered the teaching of medicine, philosophy, theology and science. The faculty was well versed not only in Zoroastrian and Persian traditions, but also taught Greek and Indian languages. The Academy included a library, an observatory, and the oldest known teaching hospital. According to historians, the Cambridge of Iran was the most important medical center in the Old World (defined as the territory of Europe, the Mediterranean and the Near East) during the 6th and 7th centuries .
  13. Sogdian is a middle Iranian language spoken in the Middle Ages by the Sogdians, a trading people who resided in Sogdiana, the historic region encompassing Samarkand and Bukhara and covering more or less present-day Uzbekistan, Tajikistan and northern Afghanistan. Before the arrival of Arabic, Sogdian was the lingua franca of the Silk Road. Sogdian traders settled in China and Sogdian monks were among the first to spread Buddhism there. As early as the 6th century, Chinese rulers appealed to the Sogdian elite to resolve diplomatic, commercial, military and even cultural issues, prompting many Sogdians to migrate from Central Asia and China’s border regions to major Chinese political centers.
  14. The Book of Ingenious Machines contains a hundred machines or objects, most of them due to the Banou Moussa brothers or adapted by them: funnel, crankshaft, conical ball valves, float valve and other hydraulic regulation systems, mask gas and ventilation bellows for mines; dredge, variable jet fountains, hurricane lamp, auto-off light, auto-powered; automatic musical instruments including a programmable flute.
  15. Astronomical ephemeris: registers of the positions of stars at regular intervals.
  16. Ibn Al-Haytam. In 2007, during a conference at the Sorbonne, I explored the use, by the Flemish painter Jan Van Eyck (early 15th century), of a bifocal geometric perspective, wrongly qualified as « primitive », erroneous and intuitive, actually inspired by the work and binocular experiences of the Arab scholar Ibn Al-Haytam (Alhazen). The latter drew on the work of his predecessors Al-Kindi, Ibn Luca and Ibn Sahl. Alhazen was widely known in the West thanks to the translations of the Franciscans of the University of Oxford (Grosseteste, Bacon, etc.). See summary biography.

SUMMARY CHRONOLOGY:

  • 310-230 BC.: Life of the Greek astronomer Aristarchus of Samos;
  • 190-120 BC.: life of the Greek astronomer Hipparchus of Nicaea;
  • v. 100-160 : life of Roman astronomer Claudius Ptolemy;
  • 700-748: life of Wasil ibn Ata, intellectual founder of Mutazilism;
  • 750: beginning of the Abbasid dynasty;
  • 751: Abbasid victory against the Chinese at the battle of Talas (Kyrgyzstan);
  • 763: founding of Baghdad by Caliph Al-Mansur;
  • 780: Timothy I, patriarch of the Nestorian Christian church in Baghdad;
  • 780-850: life of the Arab mathematician al-Kwarizmi;
  • 786 to 809: caliphate for 23 years of Haroun al-Rachîd, legendary hero of the Thousand and One Nights tales. Development of mutazilism;
  • 801-873: life of the mutazilist and Platonic philosopher Al-Kindi;
  • 805-880: life of Al-Farghani, treatise on the Astrolabe;
  • 813-833: caliphate of Al-Ma’mûn (20 years);
  • 829: creation of the first permanent astronomical observatory in Baghdad followed by that of Damascus;
  • 832: creation of the public library and creation of the Maisons de la Sagesse;
  • 833: shortly before his death, Al-Ma’mûn decrees the created Koran and has mutazilism adopted as the official doctrine of the Abbasids;
  • 836: transfer from the capital to Samarra;
  • 848: the mutazilites removed from the Baghdad court;
  • 858-930: life of Al-Battani, known as Albatenius;
  • 865-925: life of translator and doctor Sahl Rabban al-Tabari;
  • 869-883: revolt of the Zanj (black slaves from Zanzibar);
  • 892: return from the capital of the Abbasids to Baghdad;
  • 965-1039: life of Ibn Al-Haytam, known as Alhazen;
  • 973-1048: life of Al-Biruni;
  • 1095: first crusade;
  • 1258: Baghdad sacked by the Mongols;
  • 1259: creation of the Maragheh Astronomical Observatory (Iran);
  • 1304-1375: life of Ibn Al-Shâtir;
  • 1422: creation of the Astronomical Observatory of Samarkand, capital of Sogdiana;
  • 1543: Polish astronomer Nicolas Copernicus publishes his De Revolutionibus;
  • 1917: British troops enter Baghdad;
  • 2003: looting and destruction by systematic arson of libraries and museums during the Iraq war.

BIBLIOGRAPHY:

  • Mutazilism, website of the Association for the Renaissance of Mutazilite Islam (ARIM);
  • Antoine Le Bail, Who are the mutazilites, sometimes called the « rationalists » of Islam ?, website of the Institut du Monde Arabe (IMA), Paris;
  • Richard C. Martin, Mark R. Woodward with Dwi S. Atmaja, Defenders of Reason in Islam, Mu’tazilism from Medieval School to Modern Symbol, Oneworld, Oxford, 1997;
  • Nadim Michel Kalife, The Lights of the First Centuries of Islam, on financialafrik.com, 2019;
  • Mahmoud Azab, A Vision of the Universality of Arab-Islamic Civilization, Oberta de Catalunya University, www.uoc.edu;
  • Sabine Schmidke, The People of Monotheism and Justice: Mutazilism in Islam and Judaism, Institute for Advanced Study, 2017;
  • Malek Chebel, Slavery in the Land of Islam, Fayard, Paris 2012;
  • Jacques Cheminade, Sublime words and idiocy by Nasr Eddin Hodja;
  • Jacques Cheminade, Proposals for an inter-religious dialogue;
  • Hussein Askary: Baghdad 767-1258 A.D., Melting Pot for a Universal Renaissance, Executive Intelligence Review, 2013;
  • Hussein Askary: The Beauty of the Islamic Renaissance, the Elephant Clock, S&P website;
  • Dr Subhi Al-Azzawi, The House of Wisdom of the Abbasids in Baghdad or the beginnings of the University, pdf on the internet;
  • Dimitri Gutas, Greek Thought, Arab Culture. The movement of Greco-Arabic translation in Baghdad and primitive Abbasid society (2nd-4th / 8th-10th centuries), Aubier, Paris 2005;
  • Jim Al-Khalili, The House of Wisdom, How Arab Science Saved Ancient Knowledge and Gave Us the Renaissance, Pinguin, London 2010;
  • Jonathan Lyons, The House of Wisdom, How the Arabs Transformed Western Civilization, Bloomsbury, London 2009;
  • Pastor Georges Tartar, Islamo-Christian Dialogue under Caliph Al-Ma’mûn, Les épitres d’Al-Hashimi and d’Al-Kindî, Nouvelles Editions Latines, Paris, 1985; –Al-Kindî, On First Philosophy, State University of New York Press, Albany, 1974; –Marie Thérèse d´Alverny, The transmission of philosophical and scientific texts in the Middle Ages, Variorum, Aldershot 1994;
  • Danielle Jacquart, Françoise Micheau, Arab medicine and the medieval West, Maisonneuve, Paris 1990;
  • Juan Vernet Gines, What culture owes to the Arabs of Spain, Sindbad, Actes Sud, Paris, 2000;
  • Karen Armstrong, Islam, A Short History, Phoenix, London, 2002;
  • Muriel Mirak Weisbach, Andalusia, a gateway to the Renaissance;
  • Régis Morelon, Eastern Arab Astronomy between the 8th and 11th Century, in History of Arab Sciences, edited by Roshdi Rashed, Vol. 1, Astronomy, Theoretical and Applied, Seuil, Paris, 1997;
  • George Saliba, Planetary Theories in Arab Astronomy after the 11th Century, in History of Arab Sciences, edited by Roshdi Rashed, Vol. 1, Astronomy, Theoretical and Applied, Seuil, Paris, 1997;
  • Roshi Rashed, Geometric Optics, in History of Arab Sciences, edited by Roshdi Rashed, Vol. 2, Mathematics and physics, Seuil, Paris, 1997; –Jean-Pierre Verdet, A History of Astronomy, Seuil, Paris, 1990;
  • J. P. Maratray, Arab Astronomy, on the Astrosurf.com website;
  • Jean-Pierre Luminet, Ulugh Beg – The Astronomer of Samarkand, 2018;
  • Kitty Ferguson, Pythagoras, His Lives and the Legacy of a Rational Universe, Walker publishing Company, New York, 2008;
  • Sir Thomas Heath, Aristarchus of Samos, The Ancient Copernicus, Dover, New York, 1981:
  • A. T. Papadopoulo, Islam and Muslim Art, The Art of Great Civilizations, Mazenod, Paris, 1976;
  • Olag Grabar, Art and Culture in the Islamic World, Arts & Civilizations of Islam, Köneman, Cologne, 2000;
  • Christiane Gruber, Images of Muhammad in Islam, Afkar / Ideas, Spring 2015;
  • Hans Belting, Florence & Baghdad, Renaissance art and Arab science, Harvard University Press, 2011;
  • Dominique Raynaud, Ibn al-Haytham on binocular vision: a precursor of physiological optics, Arabic Sciences and Philosophy, Cambridge University Press (CUP), 2003, 13, pp. 79-99;
  • Jonathan M. Bloom, Paper Before Print: The History and Impact of Paper in the Islamic World, Yale University Press, 2001;
  • Karel Vereycken, Jan Van Eyck, a Flemish painter in Arabic optics, S&P website;
 
Merci de partager !
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

Mutazilisme et astronomie arabe, deux astres brillants au firmament de la civilisation

Par Karel Vereycken
(Same article in English)

PROLOGUE

« L’encre du savant est préférable au sang du martyr »

« Demandez la science du berceau jusqu’à la tombe. »

« Cherchez le savoir serait-ce jusqu’en Chine, s’il le faut. »


(Paroles généralement attribuées au Prophète)

Nous vivons une époque d’une stupidité cruelle. Alors que l’histoire de la civilisation se caractérise par des apports culturels multiples permettant un infini et magnifique enrichissement mutuel, tout est fait pour nous déshumaniser.

A force de médiatiser les dérives les plus extrêmes, notamment en prétendant que tel ou tel acte abject ou barbare a été commis « au nom de » telle ou telle croyance ou religion, tout est fait pour nous monter les uns contre les autres. Sans réaction de notre part, le fameux « choc des civilisations », conçu par l’islamologue britannique Bernard Lewis (le maître à penser d’Henry Kissinger, de Zbigniew Brzezinski et de Samuel Huntington) comme un outil maléfique de manipulation géopolitique, deviendra alors une prophétie auto-réalisatrice.

INTRODUCTION

Afin de combattre les préjugés et les raccourcis dangereux sur « l’islam » (avec 1,6 milliard de croyants une part non-négligeable de la population mondiale), voici un bref aperçu des apports majeurs de la civilisation arabo-musulmane.

En rappelant l’apport de l’âge d’or de l’Islam, notamment l’astronomie arabe et la philosophie mutaziliste, il s’agit de pleinement reconnaître que —tout comme Memphis, Thèbes, Alexandrie, Athènes et Rome— Bagdad, Damas et Cordoue furent des creusets majeurs d’une civilisation universelle, aujourd’hui la nôtre.

Si, en Europe, on a fini par reconnaître que l’invention de l’imprimerie avait vu le jour en Chine bien avant Gutenberg, et que l’Amérique avait été fréquentée bien avant l’arrivée de Christophe Colomb, certains persistent à affirmer que les Arabes n’ont contribué en rien aux progrès de la science.

Pendant les 1300 ans séparant l’astronome romain, le grec d’Alexandrie Claude Ptolémée (env. 100-178 apr. JC), du Polonais Nicolas Copernic (1473-1543), ce fut, nous dit-on, « un trou noir » en Europe.

Poussant la caricature de l’arrogance occidentale, Alfred Koestler, écrira dans son livre Les Somnanbules (1958) :

Les Arabes n’avaient guère été que des intermédiaires : les légataires universels de cet héritage (des Grecs). Ils avaient fait preuve d’assez peu d’originalité scientifique (…) aux mains des Arabes et des Juifs qui le conservèrent deux ou trois siècles, ce vaste ensemble de connaissances demeura stérile.

Définitivement, il faut être né au bon endroit pour pouvoir entrer dans l’histoire… Etude d’Al-Biruni sur les phases de la Lune.

Or, contrairement à Koestler, Copernic était parfaitement familiarisé avec l’astronomie arabe puisqu’en 1543, dans son De Revolutionibus, il cite toute une série de scientifiques du monde arabo-musulman, plus précisément Al-Battani, al-Bitruji, al-Zarqallu, Ibn Rushd (Averroès) et Thabit ibn Qurra. Copernic se réfère également à al-Battani dans son Commentariolus, un manuscrit publié à titre posthume.

Si Nicolas de Cues (1401-1464) cite Ibn Sina, Johannes Kepler (1571-1630), se réfère à Ibn Al-Haytam pour ses travaux sur l’optique.

En vérité, Copernic et Kepler, dont il ne s’agit pas de nier le génie, ont formulé leurs réponses à partir des questions posées par plusieurs générations d’astronomes arabes dont l’apport reste largement inexploré. A ce jour, avec environ 10 000 manuscrits conservés à travers le monde, dont une grande partie n’a toujours pas fait l’objet d’un inventaire bibliographique, le corpus astronomique arabe constitue l’une des composantes les mieux préservées de la littérature scientifique médiévale.

Science et religion contre esclavage

Bilal ibn-Raba, un esclave affranchi nommé premier muezzin.

Avant d’examiner les apports de l’astronomie arabe, quelques réflexions sur le lien entre l’islam et le développent des sciences.

Selon la tradition, c’est en 622 de notre ère que le prophète Mahomet et ses compagnons quittent La Mecque pour se mettre en route vers une simple oasis qui deviendra la ville de Médine. Si cet événement est connu sous le nom de « l’Hégire », mot arabe pour émigration, rupture ou exil, c’est également parce que Mahomet vient de rompre avec un modèle sociétal établi sur les liens du sang (organisation clanique), en faveur d’un modèle de communauté de destin fondé sur la croyance.

Dans ce nouveau modèle religieux et sociétal, où tous sont censés être « frères », il n’est plus permis d’abandonner le démuni ou le faible comme c’était le cas auparavant.

Les clans puissants de La Mecque vont tout faire pour éliminer cette nouvelle forme de société qui diminue leur influence, car l’égalité entre tous les croyants est proclamée lors de la rédaction de la Constitution de Médine, qu’ils soient libres ou esclaves, arabes ou non-arabes.

Le Coran prône d’ailleurs la stricte égalité entre Arabes et non-Arabes en conformité avec la parole du Prophète :

L’Arabe n’est pas meilleur que le non-Arabe, ou le non-Arabe que l’Arabe, le blanc au-dessus du Noir ou le Noir au-dessus du Blanc, excepté par la piété.

(Rapporté par Al Bayhaqi et authentifié par Cheikh Albani dans Silsila Sahiha n°2700).

Si par la suite, l’esclavage et la traite négrière ont pu être, hélas, une pratique courante dans presque tous les pays musulmans, on ne peut pas accuser le prophète. Zayd Ibn Harithah, nous dit la tradition, après avoir été l’esclave de Khadija, la femme de Mahomet, aurait été affranchi et adopté par ce dernier comme son propre fils.

Pour sa part, Abou Bakr, le compagnon et successeur de Mahomet qui sera le premier calife, affranchira également Bilal ibn-Raba, le fils d’une ancienne princesse abyssine réduite en esclavage. Bilal, qui possédait une voix magnifique, sera même nommé premier muezzin, c’est-à-dire celui qui lance, cinq fois par jour, l’appel à la prière depuis le sommet d’un des minarets de la mosquée.

La mosquée Rawze-i-Sharif en Afghanistan.

La mosquée est bien plus qu’un lieu de culte. Elle sert d’institution sociale et éducative : elle peut le cas échéant s’adjoindre une madrassa (école coranique), une bibliothèque, un centre de formation, voire une université.

Les premiers versets révélés au prophète Mahomet disent :

« Lis ! Au nom de ton Seigneur qui a créé, qui a créé l’homme d’une adhérence. Lis ! Ton Seigneur est le Plus Noble, qui a enseigné par la plume (le calame), a enseigné à l’homme ce qu’il ne savait pas. » (Sourate 96).

Le prophète indique également :

« Le meilleur d’entre vous est celui qui a appris le Coran et l’aura fait apprendre ».

Dans un autre hadith, le Messager d’Allah aurait enseigne l’amour de la science et du savoir aux musulmans en ces termes :

« L’encre du savant est préférable au sang du martyr »
« Demandez la science du berceau jusqu’à la tombe. »
« Cherchez la science, serait-ce jusqu’en Chine s’il le faut. »
.

La mosquée se veut donc l’école de toutes les sciences, où vont se former les savants.

Mosquée de Samarcande (aujourd’hui en Ouzbékistan), ville étape des Routes de la soie.
Les manuscrits de Tombouctou en Afrique présentent à la fois des données mathématiques et astronomiques.

Comme dans la plupart des religions, les fêtes religieuses, les pratiques et les rituels musulmans sont rythmés par des événements astronomiques (années, saisons, mois, jours, heures).

Tout fidèle doit prier cinq fois par jour à des heures qui varieront en fonction de l’endroit où il se trouve : au lever du soleil (Ajr), quand il est au zénith (Dhohr), dans l’après-midi (Asr), lors du coucher du soleil (Magrib) et au début de la nuit (Icha). L’astronomie est omniprésente.

Par ailleurs, pour marquer son importance, le premier jour de l’année lunaire de l’Hégire, correspondant au 16 juillet 622, a été décrété comme le premier jour du calendrier hégirien. Enfin, lors de l’éclipse du soleil, les mosquées accueillent une prière spéciale.

L’islam encourage les musulmans à rechercher leur chemin grâce aux astres. Le Coran énonce en effet :

« C’est lui qui a placé pour vous les étoiles (dans le ciel) afin que vous soyez dirigés dans les ténèbres sur la terre et sur les mers. »

Avec une telle incitation, les premiers musulmans ne tardèrent pas à perfectionner les instruments astronomiques et de navigation, d’où vient qu’aujourd’hui encore, la plupart des étoiles naguère utilisées par les marins portent des noms arabes.

Il était donc naturel que les fidèles essaient constamment d’améliorer les calculs et observations astronomiques.

Le premier motif est le fait que lors de la prière musulmane, le fidèle doit se prosterner en direction de la Kaaba à La Mecque : il doit donc savoir trouver cette direction où qu’il se trouve sur Terre. Et la construction d’une mosquée se décidera en fonction des mêmes données.

Le deuxième motif résulte du calendrier musulman. Le Coran édicte :

Le nombre des mois est de douze devant Dieu, tel il est dans le livre de Dieu, depuis le jour où il créa les cieux et la terre. Quatre de ces mois sont sacrés ; c’est la croyance constante.

En clair, le calendrier musulman se base sur les mois lunaires, d’une durée d’environ 29,5 jours. Or 12 x 29,5 ne fait que 345 jours dans l’année. On est loin des 365 jours, 6 heures, 9 minutes et 4 secondes qui mesurent la durée de la rotation de la Terre autour du Soleil…

Enfin, un dernier défi se posait par l’interprétation du mouvement lunaire. Les mois, dans la religion musulmane, ne commencent pas avec la nouvelle lune astronomique, définie comme l’instant où la lune a la même longitude écliptique que le Soleil (elle est donc invisible, noyée dans l’albédo solaire) ; ils commencent lorsque le croissant lunaire commence à apparaître au crépuscule.

Le Coran dit précisément : « Ils t’interrogeront sur les nouvelles lunes. Dis-leur : Ce sont les époques fixées pour l’utilité de tous les hommes et pour marquer le pèlerinage de la Mecque. » Pour toutes ces raisons, les musulmans ne pouvaient se contenter ni du calendrier chrétien ni du calendrier hébreu, et devaient en créer un nouveau.

Géométrie sphérique

Pour connaître à l’avance les phases de la Lune, il fallut développer de nouvelles méthodes de calcul et mettre au point des instruments aptes à les observer. Le calcul du jour où le croissant lunaire recommence à devenir visible constituait un redoutable défi pour les savants arabes. Pour prédire ce jour, il fallait pouvoir décrire son mouvement par rapport à l’horizon, un problème dont la résolution appartient à une géométrie sphérique assez sophistiquée.

Ce sont la détermination de la direction de la Mecque depuis un lieu donné et l’heure des prières qui ont poussé les musulmans à élaborer une telle géométrie. La résolution de ces problèmes suppose en effet que l’on sache calculer le côté d’un triangle sphérique de la sphère céleste à partir de ses trois angles et des deux autres côtés ; pour trouver l’heure exacte, par exemple, il faut savoir construire le triangle dont les sommets sont le zénith, le pôle nord et la position du Soleil.

Le domaine de l’astronomie a fortement stimulé la naissance d’autres sciences, en particulier la géométrie, les mathématiques, la géographie et la cartographie. Certains aiment rappeler que platoniciens et aristotéliciens se disputaient des concepts assez abstraits, chaque courant estimant que la raison suffisait pour comprendre la nature.

Pour sa part, l’astronomie arabe, en vérifiant les différentes hypothèses grâce à la construction d’instruments de mesure et d’observatoires astronomiques, ainsi qu’à l’enregistrement rigoureux des observations pendant de longues années, a joué un rôle décisif dans l’émergence d’une vraie méthode scientifique.

LE MUTAZILISME

Discussion philosophique entre Socrate et ses disciples. Enluminure du livre Choix de sentences et de fins propos de al-Moubashir, XIIIe siècle, Bibliothèque Topka, Istanbul.

Se pose alors la question de savoir d’où a pu venir, dans une culture qui se concentre sur le fait religieux, cet engouement pour les sciences et l’astronomie ?

Une première réponse vient du fait qu’au VIIIe siècle, peu après l’apparition du sunnisme (656), du kharidjisme (657) et du chiisme (660), mais indépendamment de ces courants, apparaît une école de pensée théologique musulmane fondée par le théologien révolutionnaire Wasil ibn Ata (700-748) ? Surnommé « mutazilisme » (ou motazilisme), se courant est identifié en Occident comme « les rationalistes » de l’Islam.

L’origine de ce nom viendrait du fait que les mutazili ont refusé de prendre part aux conflits internes de l’islam, menés par des factions qui utilisaient des interprétations théologiques pour asseoir leur propre pouvoir, le mot arabe i’tazala signifiant « se retirer ».

Wasil est né à Médine dans la péninsule arabique, et s’installe à Bassorah, actuellement en Irak. De là, il forme un mouvement intellectuel qui se répand dans le monde arabo-musulman. Parmi ses disciples, beaucoup auraient été des marchands et des non-Arabes (mawâlî), issus de familles iraniennes ou araméennes « converties », sujettes à une certaine discrimination faite par les Omeyyades entre les Arabes et les non-Arabes. Hypothèse suffisante pour accréditer la thèse d’une participation mutazilite dans le renversement des Omeyyades.

En nette rupture avec les cosmologies dualistes (mazdéisme, zoroastrisme, manichéisme, etc.), le mutazilisme insiste sur l’unité absolue de Dieu, conçue comme une entité hors du temps et de l’espace. Il y a un rapport étroit entre l’unité de la communauté musulmane (Oumma) et le culte d’adoration du Seigneur. Les mutazilites s’inspirent étroitement du Coran, et il est assez erroné d’en faire « les libres penseurs de l’islam ».

Cependant, « nous rejetons la foi comme seule voie vers la religion si elle rejette la raison », précise l’adage mutazilite. S’appuyant sur la raison (le logos cher aux penseurs grecs Socrate et Platon) qu’il estime compatible avec les doctrines islamiques, le mutazilisme affirme que l’homme peut, en dehors de toute révélation divine, accéder à la connaissance.

Tout comme l’avait souligné Augustin chez les chrétiens, l’homme peut avancer sur le chemin de la vérité, non seulement grâce à l’Evangile (la révélation), mais en lisant « le Livre de la Nature », reflet et avant-goût de la sagesse divine. Déjà, dans la Bible, dans le Livre de la Sagesse (Sg. 13:5) , on peut lire :

Car à travers la grandeur et la beauté des créatures,
on peut contempler, par analogie, leur Auteur.

Le muzatilisme donne à la raison (la faculté de penser) et à la liberté (la faculté d’agir) humaines une place et une importance non seulement inconnues dans les autres tendances de l’Islam mais même dans la plupart des courants philosophiques et religieux de l’époque.

A l’opposé du fatalisme (« mektoub ! » = c’était écrit !), qui fut la tendance dominante dans l’islam, le mutazilisme affirme que l’être humain est responsable de ses actes.

D’une modernité quasi-érasmienne (qui avait bien du mal à se faire entendre en Europe au XVIe siècle), voici les cinq principes de la foi mutazilite décrits par le théologien mutazilite Abdel al Jabbar Ibn Ahmad (935-1025), résumés en 2015 par l’économiste Nadim Michel Kalife :

  • Le monothéisme (Al Tawhïd), dont le concept de Dieu dépasse les capacités de réflexion de l’esprit humain. C’est pourquoi les versets du Coran décrivant Dieu assis sur un trône, ne doivent être interprétés que de façon allégorique et non à la lettre. D’où les mutazilites traitèrent leurs adversaires d’anthropomorphistes cherchant à ramener Dieu l’inconnaissable à une forme humaine. Et ils conclurent que ce seul détail (!) du Coran suffit à prouver que le livre n’est pas « incréé » mais « créé » par l’homme pour le mettre à la portée du croyant, et qu’il doit, par conséquent, pouvoir évoluer et s’adapter aux temps ;
  • La justice divine (Adl) concerne la responsabilité du mal dans ce monde où Dieu est tout-puissant. Le mutazilisme proclame le libre arbitre, le mal étant le fait de l’homme et non de la volonté de Dieu, car Dieu est parfait et ne peut donc pas faire le mal ni déterminer l’homme à le faire. Et, si l’erreur humaine relevait de la volonté de Dieu, la punition perdrait tout son sens puisque l’homme ne ferait que respecter la volonté divine. Cette logique incontestable permit au mutazilisme de réfuter la prédestination et le « mektoub » des écoles sunnites ;
  • Promesse et menace (al-Wa’d wa al-Wa’id) : ce principe concerne le jugement de l’homme à sa mort et celui du jugement dernier où Dieu récompensera les obéissants au paradis céleste, et punira ceux qui lui ont désobéi en les damnant éternellement aux feux de l’enfer ;
  • Le degré intermédiaire (al-manzilatu bayn al-manzilatayn), premier principe opposant le mutazilisme aux écoles sunnites. Un grand pécheur (meurtre, vol, fornication, fausse accusation de fornication, consommation d’alcool, ….) ne doit être considéré ni comme musulman (comme l’établit le sunnisme) ni comme mécréant ou kâfir (comme le pensent les Kharidjites), mais dans un degré intermédiaire d’où il ira en enfer s’il n’est pas racheté par la miséricorde de Dieu ;
  • Ordonner le bien et blâmer le blâmable (al-amr bil ma’ruf wa al-nahy ‘an al munkar) : ce principe autorise la rébellion contre l’autorité quand elle est injuste et illégitime, pour empêcher la victoire du mal sur tous. Ce principe leur attira la haine des oulémas et imams qui y trouvaient un moyen d’affaiblir leur autorité sur les fidèles. Et les Turcs Seldjoukides y virent un grave danger de contestation de leur pouvoir… sur les Arabes.

Le mutazilisme sous les Abbassides

L’Empire abbasside (749-1258).
Calife abbasside avec ses conseillers. Notez le cahier aux mains du conseiller et les têtes de chevaux dépassant la maison. (BnF.)

A Bagdad, c’est avec la prise de pouvoir des Abbassides en 749, que le mutazilisme gagnera en influence, d’abord sous le calife Hâroun al-Rachîd (765-809) (Aaron le bien guidé) et ensuite sous son fils, Al-Ma’mûn (786-833) (Celui en qui on a confiance). Peu avant sa mort en 833, ce dernier fera du mutazilisme la doctrine officielle de l’Empire des Abbassides.

C’en fut trop pour les oulémas (théologiens) et les imams (prédicateurs) conservateurs qui se rebellèrent contre cette vision éclairée ouvrant un espace de laïcité et limitant leur autorité. Face à la révolte, l’administration abbasside (constituée en grande partie de Perses), acquise au mutazilisme, mènera pendant quinze ans, de 833 à 848, une répression impitoyable contre les religieux sunnites (arabes). Cette persécution sanguinaire laissera un goût de plus en plus amer dans les consciences populaires, en particulier lorsque le pouvoir abbasside refuse de faire libérer les prisonniers musulmans aux mains des Byzantins s’ils ne renonçaient pas au dogme de l’« incréation » du Coran…

Enfin, en 848, le calife Jafar al-Mutawakkil (847-861), change totalement de cap et demande aux traditionalistes de prêcher des hadiths selon lesquels Mahomet aurait condamné les mutazilites et leurs soutiens.

La théologie dialectique (Kalâm) fut interdite et les mutazilites écartés de la cour de Bagdad. Ce fut également la fin de l’esprit de tolérance et le retour des persécutions contre les chrétiens et les juifs. Si l’engouement pour les sciences perdura, le mutazilisme disparut avec la chute des Abbassides et la destruction de Bagdad par les Mongols au XIIIe siècle.

Le mutazilisme influencera également le judaïsme. Le Kitab Al-Amanat Wa’l-I’tiqadat – c’est-à-dire le Livre des croyances et des opinions – du savant juif rabbinique du Xe siècle Saadia Gaon (882-942), qui vécut à Bagdad, tire son inspiration de la littérature théologique chrétienne ainsi que de modèles islamiques. Le Kitab al-Tawhid, le Livre de l’unité divine, du contemporain karaïte de Saadia, Jacob Qirqisani (m. 930), est malheureusement perdu.

Ce qui fait dire à l’islamologue allemande Sabine Schmidtke que :

La nouvelle tradition de la pensée rationnelle juive qui a surgi au cours du neuvième siècle était, dans sa phase initiale, principalement informée par la littérature théologique chrétienne, tant dans son contenu que dans sa méthodologie. De plus en plus, des idées islamiques spécifiquement Mutazilites, telles que la théodicée (*1) et le libre arbitre humain, ainsi que l’accent mis sur l’unicité de Dieu (tawhïd) ont résonné parmi les penseurs juifs, dont beaucoup ont finalement adopté l’ensemble du système doctrinal de la Mutazila. La ’Mutazila juive’ désormais émergente domina la pensée théologique juive pour les siècles à venir.

Abstraction faite d’égarements qui ont été bien réels, reconnaissons tout de même que la vision philosophique optimiste du mutazilisme (raison, libre arbitre, responsabilité, perfectibilité de l’homme) a fortement contribué à l’émergence d’un véritable « âge d’or » des sciences arabes.

Enfin, il n’est pas inintéressant de constater qu’aujourd’hui, des courants « néo-mutazilites » apparaissent en réaction aux doctrines obscurantistes et aux actes barbares qu’elles suscitent.

Pour le penseur réformiste égyptien Ahmad Amin,

la mort du mutazilisme a été le plus grand malheur qui a frappé les musulmans ; ils ont commis un crime envers eux-mêmes.

Bagdad

Représentation de la ville de Bagdad lors de sa fondation en 762. Notez le canal traversant la ville et permettant son intégration dans l’infrastructure naturelle du fleuve Tigre. En réalité, les alentours étaient urbanisés.

En 762, le second calife abbasside Al-Mansur (714-775) (« le victorieux ») entreprend la construction d’une nouvelle capitale, Bagdad. Appelée Madinat-As-Salam (cité de la paix), elle abrite le palais de la Cour, la mosquée et les bâtiments administratifs. Construite sur un plan circulaire, elle s’inspire des traditions antérieures, notamment celle qui avait donné naissance à la ville iranienne de Gur (nom actuel : Firouzabad).

Nous sommes au cœur de la fertile Mésopotamie, le « pays entre les fleuves », essentiellement l’Euphrate et le Tigre qui prennent chacun leur source en Turquie. C’est ici que les Sumériens inventèrent, à partir du dixième millénaire av. JC, aussi bien l’irrigation, l’agriculture (céréales et élevage) (*2), que l’écriture (-3400 ans av. JC).

Ville puissante et raffinée, Bagdad régnera sur tout l’Orient et devient la capitale du monde arabe. Traversée par le Tigre, peuplée aujourd’hui de quelque 10 millions d’habitants, elle reste la plus grande ville d’Irak ainsi que la deuxième ville la plus peuplée du monde arabe (après le Caire, en Egypte).

Minaret de la mosquée de Samarra que de nombreux Occidentaux croyaient être la Tour de Babel…

Les villes abbassides sont aménagées sur des sites immenses. Les palais et les mosquées de Samarra, nouvelle capitale à partir de 836, s’étendent sur 40 kilomètres le long des rives du Tigre. Pour correspondre à l’échelle des sites, des bâtiments monumentaux furent érigés, tels que la mosquée Abu Dulaf ou la Grande Mosquée de Samarra, sans équivalent à l’époque. Son curieux minaret hélicoïdal (52 mètres de haut) a inspiré dans les siècles suivants les représentations occidentales de la tour de Babel.

De plus, en se reposant sur une armée originaire du Khorassan (région du nord-est iranien) (*3) extrêmement disciplinée et obéissante, mais aussi sur un système élaboré de diligences et de distribution de courrier, les chefs abbassides parviennent à augmenter leur emprise sur les gouverneurs de province. Ces derniers, qui, du temps des califes omeyyades ne payaient que peu d’impôts sous prétexte qu’ils devaient assurer à leurs frais la défense des frontières du califat, devaient dès lors payer les taxes imposées par le souverain.

La Route du papier

Grâce à du papier d’excellente qualité, le travail des astronomes arabes a été conservé. Notez que les deux tiers des noms d’étoiles sont d’origine arabe. « Catalogue d’étoiles » d’al–Soufi (903–986). (BnF).

Après la victoire militaire contre les Chinois lors de la bataille de Talas (ville de l’actuel Kirghizistan), en 751, année qui marqua l’avancée la plus orientale des armées abbassides, Bagdad s’ouvre aux cultures chinoise et indienne.

Les Abbassides assimileront rapidement un certain nombre de techniques chinoises, en particulier la fabrication du papier, un art développée à Samarcande (capitale de la Sogdiane, aujourd’hui en Ouzbékistan), autre ville étape des Routes de la soie.

Les artisans de cette ville lissaient le papier à l’aide d’une pierre d’agate. La surface extrêmement lisse et brillante obtenue absorbait moins d’encre et les deux faces d’une même feuille étaient donc utilisables. Les Chinois, qui avaient inventé le papier de soie, n’avaient pas besoin de lisser leur papier parce qu’ils écrivaient avec des pinceaux et non avec des plumes.

Hâroun al-Rachîd s’intéresse fortement à la production industrielle du papier. Il ordonnera l’usage du papier dans toutes les administrations de l’Empire, plus facile à transporter que les tablettes en argile et plus intéressant que la soie, car on peut difficilement effacer ce qui y est écrit. Il développe des manufactures de papier à Samarcande et en fera construire du même type à Bagdad, Damas et à Tibériade vers 1046 (on parle alors de papier de Tripoli ou de Damas, dont la qualité est considérée comme supérieure à celle du papier de Samarcande), et au Caire avant 1199, où il est utilisé pour emballer des marchandises, et au Yémen au début du XIIIe siècle.

Dans le même temps, plusieurs fabriques de papier s’installent à leur tour en Afrique du Nord. On recense ainsi à Fès, au Maroc, 104 fabriques de papier avant 1106, et 400 meules à fabriquer du papier entre 1221 et 1240. Elles apparaîtront en Andalousie, en Espagne, à Jativa, près de Valence, en 1054 et à Tolède en 1085.

Révolution agro-industrielle

Moulin de l’Albolafia à Cordoue (Andalousie, Espagne).

Du modèle omeyyade reposant sur le tribut, le butin ou la vente d’esclaves, les premiers califes abbassides mènent la transition économique vers une économie basée sur l’agriculture, les manufactures, le commerce et les impôts.

L’introduction de technologies et de formes d’énergie plus denses (pour l’époque), vont révolutionner l’irrigation et l’agriculture :

Un moulin-navire utilisé sur le Tigre au Xe siècle. En immobilisant le bateau grâce à des câbles attachés aux deux rives, l’eau coulant sous le bateau actionne des roues à aubes faisant tourner le moulin.
  • Construction de canaux assurant l’irrigation et limitant les inondations ;
  • Construction de barrages et l’exploitation de l’énergie mécanique qu’ils produisent ;
  • Construction de moulins à eau ;
  • Utilisation de l’énergie marémotrice ;
  • Construction de moulins à vents ;
  • Distillation du kérosène. Connu en Occident comme le « pétrole lampant », il s’agit de la « première source de lumière efficace, abondante et pas chère dont ait jamais disposé l’humanité » (*4) ;

Les utilisations industrielles des moulins à eau dans le monde islamique remontent au VIIe siècle. À l’époque des croisades, toutes les provinces du monde islamique avaient des moulins en activité, d’al-Andalus et de l’Afrique du Nord au Moyen-Orient et à l’Asie centrale.

Les plus anciens moulins à vent au village de Nashtifân situé à Khâf, province du Khorassan (Iran).

Lorsque Cervantès nous dépeint son Don Quichote s’attaquant aux moulins à vents, il se moque du culte de la chevalerie, mais également des croisades.

L’irrigation, héritée du monde antique —crues du Nil en Égypte, canaux en Mésopotamie, puits à balancier (chadouf), roue mue par des animaux (noria), barrages en Transoxiane, au Khuzistan et au Yémen, galeries souterraines au pied des montagnes en Iran (qanat) ou au Maghreb (khettaras) — se met en place grâce à une solide organisation communautaire et l’intervention de l’État.

Les artisans et ingénieurs abbassides développent des machines (telles que des pompes) incorporant des vilebrequins et utiliseront des engrenages dans des moulins et des mécanismes d’élévation de l’eau. Ils se serviront également des barrages pour fournir une puissance supplémentaire à ces moulins et machines.

Ces avancées permettront la mécanisation de nombreuses tâches agricoles et industrielles et libéreront la main d’œuvre pour un travail plus créateur.

A son apogée du Xe siècle, Bagdad comptait 400 000 à 500 000 habitants. Sa survie alimentaire dépendait entièrement d’un ingénieux système de canaux pour l’irrigation des cultures et la gestion des crus récurrents de l’Euphrate et du Tigre. Exemple : le canal de Nahrawan, parallèle au Tigre, qui permettait de dévier les eaux du Tigre pour mettre la capitale à l’abri des inondations.

La production agricole se diversifie : céréales (blé, riz), fruits (abricots, agrumes), légumes, huile d’olive (Syrie et Palestine), de sésame (Irak), de rave, de colza, de lin ou de ricin (Égypte), viticulture (Syrie, Palestine, Égypte), dattes, bananes (Égypte), canne à sucre.

L’élevage reste important pour la nourriture, la fourniture de matières premières (laine, cuir) et pour le transport (chameaux, dromadaires, chevaux). Le mouton est présent partout mais l’élevage du buffle se développe (marais du bas Irak ou de l’Oronte). Les petits élevages de volailles, de pigeons et d’abeilles correspondent à une demande importante. La nourriture du peuple est essentiellement végétarienne (galette de riz, bouillie de blé, légumes et fruits).

Un certain nombre d’industries émergeront de cette révolution agro-industrielle, y compris les premières brasseries de bière, les manufactures de textile, la fabrication de cordes, de soie et, comme indiqué précédemment, de papier. Enfin, le travail des métaux, la verrerie, les céramiques, l’outillage et l’artisanat connaîtront des niveaux élevés de croissance au cours de cette période.

Charlemagne, Bagdad et la Chine

Enluminure représentant Charlemagne (à droite) réceptionnant les présents d’Hâroun al-Rachîd, dont le célèbre éléphant.

Au VIIIe et IXe siècle, cherchant à contrer les Omeyyades et l’Empire byzantin, Abbassides et Francs carolingiens nouent à plusieurs reprises des ententes et des coopérations.

Trois ambassades sont envoyées par Charlemagne à la cour d’Hâroun al-Rachîd et ce dernier lui en envoie au moins deux. Le calife lui fait parvenir de nombreux présents, comme des aromates, des tissus, un éléphant et une horloge automatique, décrite dans les Annales royales franques de 807. Les heures sont marquées par des boules de cuivre tombant sur une plaque à chaque heure, tandis que douze cavaliers apparaissent chacun à leur tour.

Le calife enverra également une mission diplomatique à Chang’an (appelé aujourd’hui Xi’an), capitale chinoise sous la dynastie des Tang. Etant aussi le terminus de la Route de la soie, son marché ouest devient centre du commerce mondial. Selon le registre de l’Autorité Six des Tang, Chang’an avait des relations commerciales avec plus de 300 nations et régions.

Route de la soie maritime

Ces relations diplomatiques avec la Chine sont contemporaines de l’expansion maritime du monde musulman dans l’océan Indien, et jusqu’en Extrême-Orient. En dehors du Nil, du Tigre et de l’Euphrate, les fleuves navigables sont rares, le transport par mer est donc très important.

Les navires du califat ont commencé à naviguer de Siraf, le port de Bassorah, vers l’Inde, le détroit de Malacca et l’Asie du Sud-Est. Les marchands arabes domineront le commerce dans l’océan Indien jusqu’à l’arrivée des Portugais au XVIe siècle. Ormuz était un centre important pour ce commerce. Il existait également un réseau dense de routes commerciales en Méditerranée, permettant aux pays musulmans de commercer entre eux et avec des puissances européennes telles que Venise et Gênes.

À cette époque, Canton (Khanfu en arabe), un port de 200 000 habitants du sud de la Chine, compte une forte communauté de commerçants venant des pays musulmans.

Et lorsque l’Empereur chinois Yongle décide à envoyer une flottille de navires en Afrique, il choisit l’amiral Zheng He (1371-1433), eunuque à la cour et d’origine musulmane. Et lorsqu’en 1497 le capitaine portugais Vasco de Gama atteint la ville kényane de Malindi, il s’y procure un pilote arabe qui le conduit directement à Kozhikode (Calicut) en Inde. En clair, un navigateur sachant naviguer sur les étoiles.

Renaissance scientifique et culturelle

Vue d’artiste de la vie culturelle à la Cour des Abbassides de Bagdad.

Sous le califat d’Hâroun al-Rachîd et de son fils Al-Ma’mûn, Bagdad et les Abbassides connaîtront un véritable âge d’or, aussi bien dans les sciences (philosophie, astronomie, mathématiques, médecine, etc.) que dans les arts (architecture, poésie, musique, peinture, etc.).

Pour l’écrivain britannique Jim Al-Khalili,

la fusion du rationalisme grec et l’islam mutazilite fera naître un mouvement humaniste d’un type qu’on ne verra guère avant l’Italie du XVe siècle.

Un sage explique le songe du Roi. Illustration de Kalila et Dimna.

Dans le domaine des sciences s’opère très tôt une assimilation des doctrines astronomiques hellénistiques, indiennes et perses antérieures. On vit la traduction de plusieurs écrits sanskrits (*5) et pehlevis (*6) en arabe.

Des ouvrages indiens de l’astronome Aryabhata (476-560), savant de premier plan de la Renaissance Gupta en Inde, et du mathématicien Brahmagupta (590-668) sont cités très tôt par leurs homologues arabes. Une célèbre traduction en arabe paraîtra vers 777 sous le titre de Zij al-Sindhind (ou Tables astronomiques indiennes).

Les sources disponibles révèlent que ce texte fut traduit après la visite d’un astronome indien à la cour du calife abbasside Al-Mansur en 770. Les Arabes adopteront également les tables de sinus (héritées des mathématiques indiennes) qu’ils préfèrent aux tables des cordes employées par les astronomes grecs. De la même époque date un recueil de chroniques astronomiques compilées sur deux siècles dans la Perse des Sassanides et connu en arabe sous le nom de Zij al-Shah (ou Tables Royales).

Dans le domaine de la musique, on peut citer entre autres le musicien arabe d’origine perse Ishaq al-Mawsili (767-850). Compositeur d’environ deux cents chansons, ce chanteur fut également un virtuose du oud (sorte de luth à manche court mais dépourvu de frettes). On lui attribue le premier système de codification de la musique arabe savante.

Mort de Mahomet, enluminure du Siyar-i Nabi, Istanbul, 1595.

Dans le domaine de la peinture, précisons d’abord que, contrairement à l’opinion dominante, le Coran n’interdit pas les images figuratives. Il n’existe aucune « interdiction » expressément déclarée et universellement acceptée, des images dans les textes légaux islamiques. Par contre, tout comme d’autres grandes religions, l’Islam condamne l’adoration d’idoles.

Du VIIIe au XVe siècle, de nombreux textes historiques et poétiques, sunnites autant que chiites, dont bon nombre ont été conçus dans des contextes turcs et persans, incluent d’admirables représentations du prophète Mahomet.

L’objectif de ces images n’était pas seulement de louer et rendre hommage au Prophète, elles représentaient aussi des occasions et des éléments centraux pour la pratique de la foi musulmane.

A ce titre, le livre de l’historien d’art allemand Hans Belting, au titre accrocheur Florence & Bagdad, l’art de la Renaissance et la science arabe (2011) est non seulement mensonger mais proprement scandaleux. Belting y présente « l’islam » comme une foi aniconique (bannissant toute représentation humaine ou animale) alors que les images figuratives représentent une partie essentielle de l’expression artistique islamique, à coté d’une calligraphie exquise et de motifs géométriques en quête d’infini.

A cela s’ajoute que d’autres religions ont connu de fortes poussées d’iconoclasme. Par exemple, et c’est une des raisons pour laquelle on sait si peu de la peinture grecque ancienne, entre 726 et 843, l’Empire byzantin a ordonné la destruction systématique des images représentant le Christ ou les saints, qu’il s’agisse de mosaïques ornant les murs des églises, d’images peintes ou d’enluminures de livres.

Dès lors, Belting, pour qui l’islam est par essence une civilisation aniconique, a bien du mal à démontrer ce qu’il annonce dans le titre : l’influence des recherches arabes (notamment Ibn al-Haytam sur la vision humaine) sur la Renaissance à Florence (en particulier sa théorisation de « la » perspective géométrique).

Dans les faits, se présentant comme un érudit, Belting conforte la thèse belliqueuse d’un supposé « choc » des civilisations, tout en prétendant le contraire.

Fresques du château du désert de Qusair Amra (VIIIe siècle, Jordanie actuelle).

Les premières manifestations de l’art pictural dans le monde arabo-musulman remontent à l’époque omeyyade (660-750). C’est de cette époque que datent les célèbres « châteaux du désert », comme celui de Qusair Amra, dans le désert de l’Est jordanien.

Couverts de peintures murales, ces palais reflètent un apport des modes de représentation byzantins, mais également perses sassanides. Ainsi, dans le palais de Qusair Amra, utilisé comme lieu de villégiature par le calife ou ses princes pour le sport et le plaisir, les fresques décrivent des constellations du zodiaque, des scènes de chasse, des fruits et des femmes au bain.

Dans le domaine des lettres, Al-Rachîd constitue une vaste bibliothèque comprenant une collection de livres rares ainsi que des milliers de livres que les rois et les princes de l’ancien monde lui ont offerts. Ces livres sont traduits et illustrés.

Illustration d’une traduction arabe des fables indiennes Kalila et Dimna.

Par exemple, Kalila et Dimna, également connu sous le nom de Fables indiennes de Bidpaï, une des œuvres les plus populaires de la littérature mondiale. Compilées en sanskrit il y a près de deux mille ans, ces fables animalières, dont Esope et La Fontaine puiseront, ont été traduites de la Chine à l’Ethiopie.

Traduites en arabe vers 750 par Ibn al-Muqaffa, elles seront richement illustrées dans le monde arabe, persan et turc. La plus ancienne copie arabe illustrée a sans doute été produite en Syrie dans les années 1200. Le paysage est symbolisé par quelques éléments : une bande d’herbe, des arbustes aux feuilles et aux fleurs stylisés. Hommes et bêtes sont représentés avec des couleurs vives et des traits simplifiés.

Véritable manuel d’éducation pour les rois, une des fables évoque l’idée

de créer une université affectée à l’étude des langues, anciennes et modernes, et à la préservation, sous des formes renouvelées, du patrimoine du genre humain…

Et à la fin de son récit, le sage Bidpaï met en garde le jeune roi Dabschelim :

Je dois insister sur ce dernier point : mes histoires ne demandent, à ce stade, aucun commentaire, aucune élucubration, aucune analyse de votre part, de la mienne ou de quiconque. De toutes les habitudes, la pire serait d’en gaspiller la substance active en recettes de comportement. Il faut résister obstinément à la tentation de les assortir de gentilles petites rationalisations, de formules percutantes, de résumés analytiques, de marques symboliques ou toute autre commodité de classement. L’encapsulage mental pervertit le remède et le rend inopérant. Il revient en fait à court-circuiter le véritable but du conte, car expliquer, c’est oublier. C’est aussi une forme d’hypocrisie – quelque chose de toxique, un antidote à la vérité. Ainsi, laissez les histoires dont vous vous souviendrez agir d’elles-mêmes par leur diversité même. Familiarisez-vous avec elles, mais n’en faites pas un jouet…

A noter également, Les séances du poète et homme de lettres Al-Hariri (1054-1122 (*7), rédigé à la fin du Xe siècle et qui connaît une formidable diffusion à travers tout le monde arabe. Le texte, qui raconte les aventures du brigand Abu Zayd, se prête tout particulièrement à l’illustration.

Al-Ma’mûn et les Maisons de la Sagesse (Bayt al-Hikma)

Les Maisons de la Sagesse, lieu et mouvement d’éducation populaire.

Après une violente dispute avec son frère qui cherchait à l’écarter du pouvoir, Al-Ma’mûn, le fils cadet d’al-Rachîd, devient en 813 le huitième calife abbasside. Il s’intéresse particulièrement aux travaux des savants, surtout ceux qui connaissent le grec. Il réunit à Bagdad des penseurs de toutes croyances, qu’il traite somptueusement et avec la plus grande tolérance. Tous écrivent en arabe, langue qui leur permet de se comprendre mutuellement. Il fit venir de Byzance des manuscrits pour enrichir la vaste bibliothèque de son père.

Ouverte aux savants, traducteurs, poètes, historiens, médecins, astronomes, scientifiques et philosophes, ce qui deviendra la première bibliothèque publique sera la base des Bayt Al-Hikma (les « Maisons de la Sagesse ») associant des activités de traduction, d’enseignement, de recherche et même de santé publique, et ceci bien avant les universités occidentales. C’est là que furent regroupés pour l’étude tous les manuscrits scientifiques connus de l’époque, en particulier les écrits grecs.

A Bagdad, ce bouillonnement culturel ne restera pas confiné à la Cour mais descendra dans la rue comme en témoigne cette description de Bagdad d’Ibn Aqul (mort en 1119) :

Il y a d’abord le grand espace nommé place du Pont. Puis le marché des Oiseaux, un marché où l’on peut trouver toutes les sortes de fleurs et sur les côtés duquel se trouvent les boutiques élégantes des changeurs. (…) Puis celui des traiteurs, celui des boulangers, celui des bouchers, celui des orfèvres, sans égal pour la beauté de son architecture : de hauts bâtiments avec des poutres de teck, supportant des pièces en encorbellement. Puis il y a le marché des libraires, immense, qui est aussi le lieu de rassemblement des savants et des poètes, puis le marché de Rusafa. Sur les marchés de Karkh et de la porte de l’Arche, les parfumeurs ne se mélangent pas avec les marchands de graisse et de produits aux odeurs désagréables ; de même les marchands d’objets neufs ne se mélangent pas avec les brocanteurs.

La Perse, les nestoriens et la médecine

Vestiges de Gondichapour, Iran.

Comme modèle de ces Maisons de la Sagesse, on évoque souvent l’influence et les précédents perses. Il est vrai que les Barmécides, famille d’origine perse (*8), avaient une grande influence auprès des premiers califes abbassides. D’ailleurs, le précepteur d’Al-Ma’mûn était Jafar ben Yahya Barmaki (767-803), un membre de cette famille et le fils du vizir persan de son père al-Rachîd. L’élite perse qui conseillait les califes abbassides portait un vif intérêt aux œuvres des Grecs, dont la traduction avait commencé lors du règne du roi sassanide Khosrô Ier Anushirvan (531-579). Ce dernier fonda l’Académie de médecine de Gondichapour (aujourd’hui en Iran). De nombreux scribes et savants nestoriens (chrétiens) (*9) s’y étaient réfugiés après le Concile d’Éphèse de 431. La langue liturgique des nestoriens était le syriaque, un dialecte sémitique (*10).

Comme les juifs, ces chrétiens nestoriens possédaient une culture cosmopolite et une connaissance des langues (le syriaque et le persan) qui leur permit d’agir en tant qu’intermédiaires entre l’Iran et ses voisins. Et grâce à leur accès à la sagesse de la Grèce ancienne, ils furent souvent employés comme médecins. (*11)

L’Académie de médecine de Gondichapour (*12) avait connu son apogée au Ve siècle grâce aux savants syriaques chassés de la ville d’Edesse. Dans cette école, on enseignait la médecine à partir des traductions du savant et médecin grec vivant à Alexandrie, Claude Galien. Ces enseignements étaient mis en pratique dans un grand hôpital, tradition reprise dans le monde musulman.

Cette école était un lieu de rencontre entre savants grecs, syriaques, perses et indiens, dont l’influence scientifique était réciproque. Héritière du savoir médical grec d’Alexandrie, l’école de Gondichapour forma plusieurs générations de médecins à la cour des Sassanides et plus tard à celle des Abbassides musulmans.

Dès 765, le calife abbasside Al-Mansur, qui règne de 754 à 775, consulte le chef de l’hôpital de Gondichapour, Georgios ben Bakhtichou, en l’invitant à Bagdad. Ses descendants travailleront et y enseigneront la médecine. Bien après l’implantation de l’islam, les élites arabes continueront à envoyer leurs fils à cette école nestorienne chrétienne.

En arabe, la médecine s’appelle al-tibb et un médecin tabib. Le mot « toubib » s’est introduit très tôt en français grâce aux voyageurs.

La première décision du Patriarche nestorien Timothée Ier fut le transfert du siège catholicosal de Séleucie-Ctésiphon à Bagdad, où il devait rester jusqu’à la fin du XIIIe siècle, nouant ainsi des liens privilégiés entre les catholicos nestoriens et les califes abbassides.

Céramique chinoise d’un marchand sogdien sur les Routes de la soie.

Timothée Ier (727-823) fut le patriarche chrétien de l’Église d’Orient (« nestorienne ») entre 780 et 823. Sa première décision fut d’installer le siège de son église à Bagdad, où elle devait rester jusqu’à la fin du XIIIe siècle, nouant ainsi des liens privilégiés entre les nestoriens et les califes abbassides.

Ayant une bonne maîtrise du syriaque, de l’arabe, du grec et éventuellement du pehlevi, Timothée jouit de la considération des califes abbassides Al-Mahdi, Al-Rachîd et Al-Ma’mûn.

Durant ses quarante-trois ans de pontificat, l’Église d’Orient vécut en paix. Par ailleurs, les nestoriens ont joué un rôle majeur dans la diffusion du christianisme en Asie centrale jusqu’en Chine par la Route de la soie.

En Asie centrale, avant l’arrivée de l’islam, c’était le sogdien, (langue iranienne de la Sogdiane et sa capitale Samarcande) qui servait de lingua franca sur la Route de la soie. (*13)

Traduire, comprendre, enseigner, perfectionner

Lecture et commentaire de texte dans une bibliothèque à Bassorah, Al-Maqâmât (Les Séances) de Al-Harîrî (1054-1122), Copié et peint par Yahyâ b. Mahmûd al-Wâsitî, Bagdad, 1236, 1236. BnF, Manuscrits, arabe 5847, f° 5v°, © BnF

A Bagdad et Bassorah, dans les Maisons de la Sagesse, furent traduits et mis à la disposition des savants, les histoires et les textes recueillis après l’effondrement de l’empire d’Alexandre le Grand, textes collationnés et traduits du syriaque en persan sous l’égide des empereurs sassanides.

L’historien et économiste arabe Ibn Khaldoun (1332-1406), issue d’une grande famille andalouse d’origine yéménite, rendra hommage à cet effort de préservation et de diffusion du patrimoine grec :

Que sont devenues les sciences des Perses dont les écrits, à l’époque de la conquête, furent anéantis par ordre d’Omar ? Où sont les sciences des Chaldéens, des Assyriens, des habitants de Babylone ?… Où sont les sciences qui, plus anciennement, ont régné chez les Coptes ? Il est une seule nation, celle des Grecs, dont nous possédons exclusivement les productions scientifiques, et cela grâce aux soins que prit Al-Ma’mûn de faire traduire ces ouvrages.

Planche du Livre des mécanismes ingénieux, inventaire de nouvelles technologies, écrit par les frères Banou Moussa pour les Maisons de la Sagesse à Bagdad.

Ces premières traductions rendent alors accessibles au monde arabo-musulman des centaines de textes de philosophie, de médecine, de logique, de mathématiques, d’astronomie, de musique grecs, pehlevis, syriaques, hébreux, sanskrits, etc., dont ceux d’Aristote, de Platon, de Pythagore, de Sushruta, d’Hippocrate, d’Euclide, de Charaka, de Ptolémée, de Claude Galien, de Plotin, d’Aryabhata et de Brahmagupta.

Elles s’accompagnaient de réflexions, de commentaires, et ont donné lieu à une nouvelle forme de littérature. Selon le patriarche nestorien Timothée Ier, c’est à la demande du calife al-Mahdi, qu’il traduisit Les Topiques d’Aristote du syriaque en arabe. Il écrivit aussi un traité d’astronomie intitulé le Livre des étoiles, aujourd’hui perdu.

Féru d’astrologie et d’astronomie, Al-Ma’mûn posa un jour comme condition de paix avec l’Empire byzantin la remise d’une copie de l’Almageste, l’œuvre principale de Ptolémée supposée résumer tout le savoir grec en astronomie.

En 829, dans le quartier le plus élevé de Bagdad, il fait construire le premier observatoire permanent au monde, l’Observatoire de Bagdad, permettant à ses astronomes, qui avaient traduit le Traité d’astronomie du grec Hipparque de Nicée (190-120 av. JC.), ainsi que son registre d’étoiles, de surveiller méthodiquement le mouvement des planètes.

Voici ce que nous dit Sâ’id al-Andalusî (1029-1070) au sujet de l’intérêt pour l’astronomie d’al-Ma’mûn et de ses efforts pour la faire progresser :

Dès que Al-Ma’mûn devint calife, sa noble âme fit tout pour accéder à la sagesse et pour ce faire il s’occupa en particulier de philosophie ; par ailleurs, les savants de son temps étudièrent en profondeur un livre de Ptolémée et comprirent les schémas d’un télescope qui y était dessiné. C’est ainsi qu’Al-Ma’mûn rassembla tous les grands savants présents à travers les régions du califat, et il leur demanda de construire le même genre d’instrument afin qu’ils observent les planètes à la manière dont Ptolémée l’avait fait et ceux qui l’avait précédé. L’objet vit donc le jour, et les savants l’amenèrent dans la ville d’al-Chamâsiyya qui se trouvait dans la région de Damas dans le Châm, et ce, en 214 de l’Hégire (829) ; à travers leurs observations ils déterminèrent la durée précise d’une année solaire ainsi que l’inclinaison du soleil, la sortie de son centre et la situation de ses diverses faces, ce qui leur permit de connaître l’état et les positions des autres planètes. Puis la mort du calife al-Ma’mûn en 218 de l’Hégire (833) mit fin à ce projet, mais ils achevèrent néanmoins la lunette astronomique et la nommèrent ’le télescope ma’mûnique’

Voici quelques astronomes, mathématiciens, penseurs, lettrés, savants et traducteurs ayant fréquenté les Maisons de la Sagesse :

  • Al-Jahiz (776-867). La démarche encyclopédique de ce mutazilite est conçue comme « un collier réunissant des perles » ou encore comme un jardin qui, avec ses plantes, son organisation harmonieuse et ses fontaines, représente en miniature l’univers entier. Il anticipe le principe d’une évolution des espèces ;
  • Al-Khwârizmî (780-850), (en latin Algoritmi). Ce mathématicien et astronome perse, zoroastrien converti à l’islam selon certains, aurait été un adepte du mutazilisme. Il est surtout connu pour avoir inventé la méthode de résolution des problèmes mathématiques, appelée algorithme, laquelle est toujours utilisée de nos jours. Il a étudié pendant un certain temps à Bagdad mais il est également rapporté qu’il fit un voyage en Inde. Al Khawârizmî inventa le mot algèbre (du mot arabe j-b-r, signifiant force, battre ou multiplier), présenta le système numérique indien au monde musulman, institutionnalisa le système décimal en mathématiques et formalisa la vérification des hypothèses scientifiques à partir d’observations ;
  • Sahl Rabban al-Tabari (786-845), astronome et médecin juif dont le nom veut dire « Le fils du rabbin du Tabaristan ». Son fils Ali sera le précepteur d’Al-Razi (865-925) (francisé en Rhazès). Alchimiste devenu médecin, il aurait isolé l’acide sulfurique et l’éthanol dont il fut parmi les premiers à prôner l’utilisation médicale. Il a largement influencé la conception de l’organisation hospitalière en lien avec la formation des futurs médecins. Il fut l’objet de nombreuses critiques pour son opposition à l’aristotélisme ;
  • Al-Hajjaj (786-823) rédigea la première traduction arabe des Éléments d’Euclide depuis le grec. Il traduisit également l’Almageste de Ptolémée ;
  • Al-Kindi (801-873) (Alkindus), considéré le père de la philosophie arabe était un mutaziliste. Auteur prolifique (environ 260 livres), il explore tous les domaines : géométrie, philosophie, médecine, astronomie, physique, arithmétique, logique, musique et psychologie. Avec ses collègues, Al-Kindi est chargé de la traduction des manuscrits de savants grecs. Après la mort d’Al-Ma’mun en 833, il est considéré comme trop mutaziliste, tombe en disgrâce et sa bibliothèque est confisquée ;
  • Les frères Banou Moussa (« enfants de Moïse »), trois jeunes fils d’un astrologue décédé, ami du calife. Mohammed travaillera sur l’astronomie ; Ahmed et Hassan sur les canaux reliant l’Euphrate au Tigre, gage de la maîtrise et de l’optimisation de leurs crues respectives. Ils publieront le Livre des mécanismes ingénieux, un inventaire des nouvelles techniques et machines (*14) ;
  • Hunayn ibn Ishâk (808-873) (dit Iohannitius). Ce chrétien nestorien fut chargé par Al-Ma’mun de veiller à la qualité des traductions ; lui-même médecin, il traduisit certaines œuvres du médecin grec Claude Galien ;
  • Thabit ibn Qurra (836-901), un astronome, mathématicien, philosophe et musicologue syrien ;
  • Qusta ibn Luqa (820-912), un médecin byzantin grec, également philosophe, mathématicien, astronome, naturaliste et traducteur. Chrétien de l’Église melkite, il parlait aussi bien le grec (sa langue maternelle) que l’arabe, et aussi le syriaque. Considéré avec Hunayn ibn Ishâq, comme l’un des personnages-clefs de la transmission du savoir grec de l’Antiquité au monde arabo-musulman. Traducteur d’Aristarque de Samos pour qui la Terre tournait autour du Soleil et auteur d’un traité sur l’astrolabe ;
  • Ibn Sahl (940-1000), dans les pas d’Al-Kindi, écrit vers 984 un traité sur les miroirs ardents et les lentilles, en exposant comment ils peuvent focaliser la lumière en un point. Ses travaux furent perfectionnés par Ibn Al-Haytam (965-1040) (nom latin : Alhazen), dont les écrits arrivèrent jusqu’à Léonard de Vinci, en passant par les Commentaires de Lorenzo Ghiberti. Chez Ibn-Sahl, on trouve la première mention de la loi de la réfraction redécouverte plus tard en Europe sous le nom de loi de Snell-Descartes.

Ces savants travailleront souvent en équipe dans un esprit totalement interdisciplinaire. Al-Ma’mûn, constatant les contradictions apparues suite aux traductions des sources grecques, perses et indiennes, fixera avec les savants les grands défis scientifiques à relever :

  • obtenir, grâce à des observatoires astronomiques plus performants, des tables d’éphémérides astronomiques (*15) plus précises que celles de Ptolémée ;
  • calculer avec précision la circonférence de la Terre avec des méthodes plus avancées que celle de l’astronome grec Ératosthène ;
  • produire une mappemonde intégrant les dernières connaissances géographiques concernant les distances entre les villes et la taille des continents ;
  • déchiffrer les hiéroglyphes égyptiens qu’Al-Ma’mûn avait entrevus lors de son voyage dans ce pays.

Traduction de Platon

A gauche, Socrate, le maître de Platon, perdu dans ses pensées, et deux disciples enturbannés à la mode arabe qui l’interrogent. (Bibliothèque Topkapi, Istanbul.)

En affirmant que c’est la redécouverte d’Aristote et sa méthode purement empiriste qui a fait avancer la science à cette époque, on oublie l’apport majeur que fut la redécouverte de Platon, dont la méthode dialectique et d’hypothétisation est bien plus essentielle.

L’implication intense d’Al-Kindi dans la tradition platonicienne se traduit par la rédaction de résumés de l’Apologie et du Criton, et par ses propres œuvres qui paraphrasent le Phédon ou s’inspirent du Ménon et du Banquet. Pour sa part, Ibn al-Bitriq, un Syrien membre du cercle d’Al-Kindi, a traduit le Timée.

Le médecin Hunayn ibn Ishaq et son cercle traduisirent surtout des commentaires du médecin grec Claude Galien sur le Timée, notamment Sur ce que Platon a dit dans le Timée de manière médicale ainsi que Sur les doctrines d’Hippocrate et de Platon. Et d’après les propres œuvres de Hunayn, nous savons que certains de ses élèves ont traduit les résumés perdus de Galien sur le Cratyle, le Sophiste, le Parménide, l’Euthydème, La République et Les Lois. Enfin, le médecin al-Razi a présenté et commenté le traité de Plutarque Sur la génération de l’âme dans le Timée.

Dialogue interreligieux :
possible pour les uns, compliqué pour les autres

En Occident, le nom d’Al-Kindi est surtout connu en association avec L’Apologie d’Al-Kindi, un texte anonyme de l’époque. Il s’agit sans doute d’un dialogue fictif entre deux fidèles, l’un musulman (Abdallah Al-Hashimi), l’autre chrétien (Al-Kindi), chacun faisant l’apologie de sa religion et invitant l’autre à le rejoindre ! Ce dialogue aurait eu lieu à l’époque du calife Al-Ma’mûn. Ce que l’on sait de l’ouverture d’esprit du Calife ne vient pas contredire cette assertion. Le plus ancien commentaire sur cette Apologie appartient à Al-Biruni (973-1048).

Le manuscrit de L’Apologie d’Al-Kindi fut traduit en latin en 1142 à la demande de Pierre le Vénérable (1092-1156), abbé de l’abbaye de Cluny, la plus puissante et la plus importante de l’Europe latine. La même année, après avoir visité Tolède, il conçoit l’idée d’une réfutation systématique de la religion musulmane qu’il considère comme hérétique et errante.

Voici comment il explique la traduction qu’il vient d’ordonner du Coran (la Lex Mahumet pseudoprophete) par une équipe de traducteurs (dont un Arabe) constituée à l’occasion :

Qu’on donne à l’erreur mahométane le nom honteux d’hérésie ou celui, infâme, de paganisme, il faut agir contre elle, c’est-à-dire écrire. Mais les latins et surtout les modernes, l’antique culture périssant, suivant le mot des Juifs qui admiraient jadis les apôtres polyglottes, ne savent pas d’autre langue que celle de leur pays natal. Aussi n’ont-ils pu ni reconnaître l’énormité de cette erreur ni lui barrer la route. Aussi mon cœur s’est enflammé et un feu m’a brûlé dans ma méditation. Je me suis indigné de voir les Latins ignorer la cause d’une telle perdition et leur ignorance leur ôter le pouvoir d’y résister ; car personne ne répondait, car personne ne savait. Je suis donc allé trouver des spécialistes de la langue arabe qui a permis à ce poison mortel d’infester plus de la moitié du globe. Je les ai persuadés à force de prières et d’argent de traduire d’arabe en latin l’histoire et la doctrine de ce malheureux et sa loi même qu’on appelle Coran.

Accusée donc « la langue arabe qui a permis à ce poison mortel (l’islam) d’infester plus de la moitié du globe »

Cette déclaration de guerre était sans doute essentielle pour motiver les troupes. Rappelons que Eudes de Châtillon, le grand prieur de l’abbaye de Cluny, qui deviendra le pape Urbain II en 1088, sera, en 1095, à l’origine de la première croisade, conduisant les bandits qui ravageaient la France à aller guerroyer ailleurs.

Le déclin et Al-Ghazali

Enluminure du Kitab Mukhtar al-Hikam wa-Mahasin al-Kilam d’Al-Mubashir – XIIIe s.
Ms Ahmed III N° 3206, Bibliothèque Topkapi, Istanbul. Le philosophe semble plus regarder son doigt que l’astrolabe dont il est supposé expliquer l’emploi aux élèves, situation qui inquiète ces derniers.

Revenons aux Abbassides. Comme nous l’avons dit, avec l’arrivée au pouvoir d’Al-Mutawakkil en 847, le mutazilisme est écarté du pouvoir et les Maisons de la Sagesse réduites en simples bibliothèques. Ce que n’empêcha pas un voyageur, décrivant sa visite à Bagdad en 891, de rapporter que la ville renfermait plus de cent bibliothèques publiques. Suivant le modèle Bayt Al-Hikma, des petites bibliothèques furent fondées à chaque coin de rue de la cité…

Empêtrée dans des débats théologiques sans fin entre experts et gagné par le sectarisme, l’élite mutaziliste se coupe d’un peuple qui perd confiance et finira par accueillir avec un sentiment de soulagement la doctrine obscurantiste acharite d’Al-Ghazâlî (1058-1111) (nom latin : Algazel), le pire ennemi des mutazilites.

Al-Ghazâlî propose une solution radicale : la philosophie n’est dans le vrai que lorsqu’elle s’accorde avec la religion – ce qui, d’après lui, est rare. Cela le conduit donc à radicaliser sa position, et à attaquer de plus en plus la philosophie gréco-arabe, coupable, à ses yeux, de blasphème.

Là où quelqu’un comme le perse Ibn Sina (980-1037) (nom latin : Avicenne), auteur des Canons ou Préceptes de médecine (vers 1020), croisait philosophie grecque et religion musulmane, Al-Ghazâlî veut désormais filtrer la première par la seconde.

D’où son ouvrage le plus célèbre et le plus important, L’incohérence des philosophes, rédigé en 1095. Il y dénonce « l’orgueil » des philosophes qui prétendent « réécrire le Coran » à travers Platon et Aristote. Leur erreur est avant tout une erreur logique, comme l’indique le titre même de l’ouvrage qui souligne leur « incohérence » : ils veulent compléter le Coran par la philosophie grecque alors que, venant après elle dans l’histoire, le Coran n’a nul besoin d’être complété. Il promeut ainsi une approche beaucoup plus littérale du texte coranique, alors que Ibn Sina en défendait, prudemment il est vrai, une approche métaphorique. En vérité, c’est l’aristotélisme et le nominalisme qui triomphent.

A partir du XIe siècle, les Abbassides, dont l’Empire se morcelle, feront appel aux princes turcs seldjoukides pour les protéger contre les Chiites, soutenus par le califat fatimide du Caire.

Progressivement, les troupes turques et mongoles, venues d’Asie centrale, finissent par régenter la sécurité du calife abbasside, tout en le laissant exercer son pouvoir religieux.

Puis, en 1258, ils destitueront le dernier calife et confisqueront son titre de successeur du Prophète, ce qui leur donnera le pouvoir religieux sur les quatre écoles du sunnisme. Pour soumettre les populations arabes et perses, les Turcs seldjoukides créeront la madrasa (école coranique) où l’on enseigne la doctrine conservatrice du sunnisme acharite, à l’exclusion de la théologie dialectique mutazilite, considérée comme une menace idéologique pour l’autorité turque sur les Arabes.

L’empire abbasside déclinera sous l’effet de l’incurie administrative, de l’abandon de la maintenance des canaux, des disettes provoquées par les inondations, des injustices sociales, des révoltes d’esclaves et des tensions religieuses entre chiites et sunnites. A la fin du IXe siècle, les Zendj, esclaves noirs (de Zanzibar) qui travaillent dans les marais du bas-Irak, se révoltent à plusieurs reprises, jusqu’à occuper Bassorah et menacer Bagdad. Le calife rétablira l’ordre au prix d’une répression d’une violence inouïe. Les révoltés ne seront écrasés qu’en 883 au prix de très nombreuses victimes, mais l’empire ne s’en remettra pas.

En 1019, le calife interdit toute nouvelle interprétation du Coran, s’opposant radicalement à l’école mutazilite. C’est un coup d’arrêt brutal au développement de l’esprit critique et aux innovations intellectuelles et scientifiques dans l’empire arabe dont les conséquences se font sentir jusqu’à nos jours.

ASTRONOMIE

Depuis la nuit des temps (c’est le cas de le dire), l’homme a essayé de comprendre l’organisation des astres dans l’environnement proche de la Terre.

Des installations comme Stonehenge (2800 av. JC) en Angleterre permettaient aux premiers observateurs d’identifier les cycles qui déterminent l’endroit et le jour exact où se lèvent certains astres. Toutes ces observations posaient des paradoxes : autour de nous, la terre apparaît relativement plate, mais la Lune ou le Soleil que nous percevons avec les mêmes yeux nous semblent sphériques. Le Soleil « se lève » et « se couche », nous disent nos sens, mais où est la réalité ?

Il semblerait que Thalès de Milet (625-547 av. JC) ait été le premier à s’être réellement posé la question de la forme de la Terre. Il pense alors qu’elle a la forme d’un disque plat sur une vaste étendue d’eau. Ce sont ensuite Pythagore et Platon qui imaginent une forme sphérique jugée plus belle et plus rationnelle. Enfin Aristote rapporte quelques preuves observationnelles comme la forme arrondie de l’ombre de la Terre sur la Lune lors des éclipses.

Le scientifique grec Ératosthène, libraire-en-chef de la bibliothèque d’Alexandrie, calcule ensuite la circonférence terrestre. Il avait remarqué qu’à midi, le jour du solstice d’été, il n’y avait aucune ombre du côté d’Assouan. En mesurant l’ombre d’un bâton planté à Alexandrie au même moment et en connaissant la distance qui sépare les deux cités, il déduit la circonférence de la Terre avec une précision assez étonnante : 39 375 kilomètres contre quelque 40 000 kilomètres pour les estimations actuelles.

Entre l’Almageste de Ptolémée et le De Revolutionibus de Copernic, nous l’avons dit, l’astronomie arabe constitue « le chaînon manquant ».

Le titre original de l’œuvre de Ptolémée est « La composition mathématique ». Les Arabes, très impressionnés par cet ouvrage, le qualifièrent de « megiste », du grec signifiant « très grand », auquel ils ajoutèrent l’article arabe « al », pour donner « al megiste » qui devint Almageste.

Il est important de savoir que Ptolémée n’a jamais eu l’occasion de relire son traité comme un tout. Après avoir écrit le premier des treize livres de son œuvre, celui sur « Les postulats fondamentaux de l’astronomie », Ptolémée le passe aux copistes qui le reproduisent et le diffusent largement sans attendre l’achèvement des autres douze livres…

Après l’Almageste, Ptolémée, confronté à des observations remettant en cause ses propres observations et afin de rectifier ses erreurs, écrira une autre œuvre intitulée les « Hypothèses planétaires ». Astrolabe d’al-Shali (Tolède-1067) – Musée archéologique national de Madrid.

L’auteur y revient sur les modèles présentés dans son précédent ouvrage tout en apportant des modifications concernant les mouvements moyens (des planètes) pour tenir compte de nouvelles observations.

Pour autant, ses Hypothèses planétaires allaient au-delà du modèle mathématique de l’Almageste pour présenter une réalisation physique de l’univers comme un ensemble de sphères imbriquées, dans lesquelles il utilisait les épicycles de son modèle planétaire pour calculer les dimensions de l’univers.

Enfin, l’Almageste contient également une description de 1022 étoiles regroupées en 48 constellations. Ptolémée y présente la projection stéréographique inventée par Hipparque, la base théorique dont se serviront ensuite les astronomes arabes pour construire l’astrolabe.

Aristarque de Samos utilisa la trigonométrie pour tenter de mesurer les distances entre la Terre, la Lune et le Soleil. Ce grand mathématicien fut le premier à affirmer que le Soleil était le centre de l’Univers. Archimède disait de lui : « Aristarque avance l’hypothèse que le Soleil et les étoiles fixes sont stationnaires, que la Terre est entraînée sur une orbite circulaire autour du Soleil… et que la sphère des étoiles fixes, avec son centre au Soleil, a une extension si grande que l’orbite terrestre se trouve à la distance des étoiles comme le centre de la sphère à sa surface ».

Au IXe siècle, lorsque les Arabes s’ intéressent à l’astronomie, la connaissance repose sur les principes suivants résumés dans l’œuvre de Ptolémée :

  • Ignorant les affirmations d’Aristarque de Samos (310-230 av. JC) pour qui la Terre tournait autour du Soleil, Ptolémée reprend au IIe siècle de notre ère la thèse d’Eudoxe de Cnide (env. 400-355 av. JC) et surtout d’Hipparque (180 à 125 av. JC) affirmant que la Terre est une sphère immobile placée au centre de l’univers (géocentrisme) ;
  • Ptolémée s’accorde avec Platon, qui s’inspirait de Pythagore, pour affirmer que le cercle étant la seule forme parfaite, les autres corps tournant autour de la Terre le font selon des trajectoires circulaires et uniformes (sans accélération ni ralentissement) ;
  • Tous savent pourtant que certaines planètes ne suivent pas ces règles parfaites. Au VIe siècle, le philosophe néo-platonicien Simplicius, écrit dans son Commentaire à la Physique d’Aristote : « Platon pose alors ce problème aux mathématiciens : quels sont les mouvements circulaires uniformes et parfaitement réguliers qu’il convient de prendre pour hypothèses, afin que l’on puisse sauver les apparences que les astres errants présentent ? » ;
  • Afin de rendre compte de la rétrogradation apparente de Mars, Hipparque introduira d’autres figures parfaites secondaires, encore des cercles. L’articulation et l’interaction de ces « épicycles » donnaient l’apparence de coller avec les faits observés. Ptolémée reprend cette démarche ;
  • Cependant, plus la précision des mesures astronomiques s’améliore, plus on découvre des anomalies et plus il faut multiplier ces épicycles imbriqués, ce qui devient vite très compliqué et inextricable ;
  • L’Univers se divise en une région sublunaire où tout est créé et donc périssable, et le reste de l’univers, supra-lunaire, qui est impérissable et éternel.

Hipparque de Nicée

L’Almageste de Ptolémée (reprenant les épicycles d’Hipparque), traduit en arabe.

Les astronomes arabes, pour les raisons aussi bien religieuses qu’intellectuelles que nous avons évoquées en début d’article, vont initialement découvrir et ensuite, sur la base d’observations de plus en plus poussées, contester les hypothèses d’Hipparque à la base du modèle ptoléméen.

Hipparque, dont Ptolémée est l’exécuteur testamentaire, imagine un système de coordonnées des astres basé sur les longitudes et les latitudes. On lui doit également l’usage des parallèles et des méridiens pour le repérage sur la Terre ainsi que la division de la circonférence en 360° héritée du calcul sexagésimal (qui a pour base le nombre 60) des Babyloniens.

En astronomie, ses travaux sur la rotation de la Terre et des planètes sont nombreux. Hipparque explique le mécanisme des saisons en constatant l’obliquité de l’écliptique : inclinaison de l’axe de rotation de la Terre. En comparant ses observations avec d’autres plus anciennes, il découvre la précession des équinoxes due à cette inclinaison : l’axe de rotation de la Terre effectue un mouvement conique de l’Orient vers l’Occident et de révolution complète tous les 26 000 ans. Ainsi dans quelques millénaires, le pôle Nord ne pointera plus vers l’étoile polaire mais vers une autre étoile, Véga.

D’Hipparque, les Arabes reprennent, en l’améliorant, un instrument de mesure de positions important : l’astrolabe. Ce « joyau mathématique » permet de mesurer la position des étoiles, des planètes, de connaître l’heure sur Terre. Plus tard, l’astrolabe sera remplacé par des instruments plus précis et plus simples d’emploi, comme le quadrant, le sextant ou l’octant.

Avec les manuscrits dont ils disposaient dans les Maisons de la Sagesse et les observatoires de Bagdad et de Damas, les astronomes arabes eurent des textes d’une incroyable richesse mais souvent en contradiction flagrante avec leurs propres observations des mouvements de la Lune et du Soleil. C’est de cette confrontation que naîtront les découvertes ultérieures. Les Arabes introduiront abondamment les mathématiques pour résoudre les problèmes, en particulier la trigonométrie et l’algèbre.

Les astronomes arabes

Afin de présenter les principaux astronomes arabes et leurs contributions, voici un extrait de l’article remarquable de J. P. Maratray L’astronomie arabe.

  • Al-Khwârizmî (783-850) dit Algoritmi
    Mathématicien, géographe et astronome d’origine perse, il est membre des « Maison de la Sagesse ». C’est l’un des fondateurs des mathématiques arabes, en s’inspirant des connaissances indiennes, en particulier du système décimal, des fractions, des racines carrées… On lui doit le terme « algorithme ». Les algorithmes sont connus depuis l’antiquité, et le nom d’Al-Khwârizmî (Algoritmi en latin) sera donné à ces suites d’opérations élémentaires répétées. Il est aussi l’auteur du terme « algèbre », qui est le titre de l’un de ses ouvrages traitant du sujet. Il est aussi le premier à utiliser la lettre x pour désigner une inconnue dans une équation. Il est surnommé « le père de l’algèbre ». Il écrit le premier livre d’algèbre (al-jabr) dans lequel il décrit une méthode systématique de résolution d’équations du second degré et propose un classement de ces équations. Il introduit l’usage des chiffres que nous utilisons encore aujourd’hui. Ces chiffres « arabes » sont en fait d’origine indienne, mais furent utilisés mathématiquement par Al-Khwârizmî. Il adopte l’utilisation du zéro, inventé par les Indiens au Ve siècle, et repris par les Arabes par son intermédiaire. Les Arabes traduiront le mot indien « sunya » par « as-sifr », qui devient « ziffer » et « zephiro ». Ziffer donnera « chiffre », et zephiro, « zéro ». Al-Khwârizmî établit des tables astronomiques (position des cinq planètes, du Soleil et de la Lune) basées sur l’astronomie hindoue et grecque. Il étudie la position et la visibilité de la Lune et ses éclipses, du Soleil et des planètes. C’est le premier ouvrage astronomique totalement arabe. Un cratère de la Lune porte son nom.
  • Al-Farghani (805-880) dit Alfraganus.
    Né à Ferghana dans l’actuel Ouzbékistan, il écrit en 833 les Eléments d’astronomie, basés sur les connaissances grecques de Ptolémée. Il est l’un des plus remarquables astronomes au service de Al-Ma’mûn, et membre de la Maison de la Sagesse. Il introduit des idées nouvelles, comme le fait que la précession des équinoxes doit affecter la position des planètes, et pas seulement celle des étoiles. Son ouvrage sera traduit en latin au XIIe siècle, et aura un grand retentissement dans les milieux très fermés des astronomes d’Europe occidentale. Il détermine le diamètre de la Terre qu’il estime à 10500 km. On lui doit également un ouvrage sur les cadrans solaires et un autre sur l’astrolabe.
  • Al-Battani (850-929) dit Albatenius.
    Il observe le ciel depuis la Syrie. On le surnomme parfois « le Ptolémée des Arabes ». Ses mesures sont remarquables de précision. Il détermine la durée de l’année solaire, la valeur de la précession des équinoxes, l’inclinaison de l’écliptique. Il constate que l’excentricité du Soleil est variable, sans aller jusqu’à interpréter ce phénomène comme une trajectoire elliptique. Il rédige un catalogue de 489 étoiles. On lui doit la première utilisation de la trigonométrie dans l’étude du ciel. C’est une méthode beaucoup plus puissante que celle, géométrique, de Ptolémée. Son œuvre principale est Le livre des tables. Il est composé de 57 chapitres. Traduit en latin au XIIe siècle par Platon de Tivoli (en 1116), il influencera beaucoup les astronomes européens de la Renaissance.
  • Al-Soufi (903-986) dit Azophi.
    Astronome perse, il traduit des ouvrages grecs dont l’Almageste et améliore les estimations des magnitudes d’étoiles. En 964, il publie Le livre des étoiles fixes, où il dessine des constellations. Il semble avoir été le premier à rapporter une observation du grand nuage de Magellan (une nébuleuse), visible au Yémen, mais pas à Ispahan. De même, on lui doit une première représentation de la galaxie d’Andromède, probablement déjà observée avant lui. Il la décrit comme « un petit nuage » dans la bouche de la constellation arabe du Grand Poisson. Son nom (Azophi) a été donné à un cratère de la Lune.
  • Al-Khujandi (vers 940- vers 1000).
    Il est astronome et mathématicien perse. Il construit un observatoire à Ray, près de Téhéran, comportant un énorme sextant, fabriqué en 994. C’est le premier instrument apte à mesurer des angles plus précis que la minute d’angle. Il mesure avec cet instrument l’obliquité de l’écliptique, en observant les passages au méridien du Soleil. Il trouve 23° 32’ 19’’. Ptolémée trouvait 23° 51’, et les indiens, bien plus tôt, 24°. Jamais l’idée de la variation naturelle de cet angle ne vint aux Arabes. Ils dissertèrent longtemps sur la précision des mesures, ce qui fit avancer leur science.
  • Ibn Al-Haytam (965-1039) dit Alhazen.
    Mathématicien et opticien né à Bassorah dans l’Irak actuel, il est sollicité par les autorités égyptiennes pour résoudre le problème des crues du Nil. Sa solution était la construction d’un barrage vers Assouan. Il renonça devant l’énormité de la tâche (le barrage fut construit en 1970 !). Devant cet échec, il feignit la folie jusqu’à la mort de son patron. Il fait un bilan critique des thèses de Ptolémée et de ses prédécesseurs, et écrit Doutes sur Ptolémée. Il dresse un catalogue des incohérences, sans toutefois proposer de solution alternative. Parmi les incohérences qu’il relève, on peut citer la variation du diamètre apparent de la Lune et du Soleil, la non uniformité des mouvements prétendument circulaires, la variation de la position des planètes en latitude, l’organisation des sphères grecques … et, observant que la Voie Lactée n’a pas de parallaxe, il place cette dernière très éloignée de la Terre, en tous cas plus loin que la sphère sublunaire d’Aristote. Malgré ses doutes, il conserve la place centrale de la Terre dans l’univers. Ibn Al-Haytam reprend les travaux des savants grecs, d’Euclide à Ptolémée, pour lesquels la notion de lumière est étroitement liée à la notion de vision : la principale question étant de savoir si l’œil a un rôle passif dans ce processus ou s’il envoie une sorte de fluide pour « interroger » l’objet. Par ses études du mécanisme de la vision, Ibn Al-Haytam montra que les deux yeux étaient un instrument d’optique, et qu’ils voyaient effectivement deux images séparées. Si l’œil envoyait ce fluide, on pourrait voir la nuit. Il comprit que la lumière du soleil se reflétait sur les objets et ensuite entrait dans l’œil. Mais pour lui, l’image se forme sur le cristallin… Il reprend les idées de Ptolémée sur la propagation rectiligne de la lumière, accepte les lois de réflexion sur un miroir, et pressent que la lumière a une vitesse finie, mais très grande. Il étudie la réfraction, déviation d’un rayon lumineux au passage d’un milieu à un autre, et prévoit une modification de la vitesse de la lumière à ce passage. Mais il ne put jamais calculer l’angle de réfraction. Il trouve que le phénomène du crépuscule est lié à la réfraction de la lumière solaire dans l’atmosphère, dont il tente de mesurer la hauteur, sans y parvenir. Déjà connue dans l’antiquité, on lui doit une description très précise et l’utilisation à des fins d’expériences, de la chambre noire (camera obscura), pièce noire qui projette une image sur un mur en passant par un petit trou percé sur le mur d’en face. Le résultat de toutes ces recherches optiques est consigné dans son Traité d’optique qu’il mit six ans à écrire et qui fut traduit en latin en 1270. (*16) En mécanique, il affirme qu’un objet en mouvement continue de bouger aussi longtemps qu’aucune force ne l’arrête. C’est le principe d’inertie avant la lettre. Un astéroïde porte son nom : 59239 Alhazen.
  • Al-Biruni (973-1048).
    Certainement l’un des plus grands savants de l’islam médiéval, originaire de Perse ; il s’intéresse à l’astronomie, à la géographie, à l’histoire, à la médecine et aux mathématiques, et à la philosophie en général. Il rédige plus de 100 ouvrages. Il sera aussi percepteur des impôts, et un grand voyageur, en particulier en Inde, où il étudie la langue, la religion et la science. A l’âge de 17 ans, il calcule la latitude de sa ville natale de Kath (en Perse, actuellement en Ouzbékistan). A 22 ans, il a déjà écrit plusieurs ouvrages courts, dont un sur la cartographie. En astronomie, il observe les éclipses de Lune et de Soleil. Il est l’un des premiers à évaluer les erreurs sur ses mesures et celles de ses prédécesseurs. Il constate une différence entre la vitesse moyenne et la vitesse apparente d’un astre. Il mesure le rayon de la Terre à 6339,6 km (le bon chiffre est 6378 km), résultat utilisé en Europe au XVIe siècle. Lors de ses voyages, il rencontre des astronomes indiens partisans de l’héliocentrisme et de la rotation de la Terre sur son axe. Il sera toujours sceptique, car cette théorie implique le mouvement de la Terre. Mais il se posera la question : « Voilà un problème difficile à résoudre et à réfuter ». Il estime que cette théorie n’entraîne aucun problème sur le plan mathématique. Il réfute l’astrologie, arguant que cette discipline est plus conjecturale qu’expérimentale. En mathématiques, il développe le calcul des proportions (règle de trois), démontre que le rapport de la circonférence d’un cercle à son diamètre est irrationnel (futur nombre Pi), calcule des tables trigonométriques, et met au point des méthodes de triangulations géodésiques.
  • Ali Ibn Ridwan (988-1061).
    Astronome et astrologue égyptien, il écrit plusieurs ouvrages astronomiques et astrologiques, dont un commentaire d’un autre livre de Claude Ptolémée, la Tetrabible. Il observe et commente une supernova (SN 1006), sans doute la plus brillante de l’histoire. On estime aujourd’hui sa magnitude, d’après les témoignages qui nous sont parvenus, à -7,5 ! Elle est restée visible plus d’un an. Il explique que cette nouvelle étoile avait deux à trois fois le diamètre apparent de Vénus, un quart de la luminosité de la Lune, et qu’elle se trouvait bas sur l’horizon sud. D’autres observations occidentales corroborent cette description, et la place dans la constellation du Loup.
  • Du XIe au XVIe siècle.
    Après une première phase, des observatoires plus importants sont construits. Le premier d’entre eux, modèle des suivants, est celui de Marâgha, dans l’Iran actuel. Leur but est d’établir des modèles planétaires, et de comprendre le mouvement des astres. (…) L’école ainsi constituée aura son apogée avec Ibn Al-Shâtir (1304-1375). D’autres observatoires suivront, comme celui de Samarcande au XVe siècle, Istanbul au début du XVIe siècle, et, en Occident, celui de Tycho Brahé à Uraniborg (Danemark d’alors) à la fin du XVIe. Les nouveaux modèles ne sont plus d’inspiration ptoléméenne, mais restent géocentriques. La physique de l’époque refuse toujours de mettre la Terre en mouvement et de l’enlever du centre du monde. Ces modèles s’inspirent des épicycles grecs, en conservant les cercles, mais en les simplifiant. Par exemple, Al-Tûsî propose un système comprenant un cercle roulant à l’intérieur d’un autre cercle de rayon double. Ce système transforme deux mouvements circulaires en un mouvement rectiligne alternatif, et explique les variations de la latitude des planètes. En outre, il rend compte des variations des diamètres apparents des astres. Mais pour aller plus loin, il faudra changer de système de référence, ce que les Arabes se sont refusés de faire. Ce changement interviendra avec la révolution copernicienne, à la Renaissance, dans laquelle la Terre perd son statut de centre du monde.
  • Al-Zarqali (1029-1087) dit Arzachel.
    Mathématicien, astronome et géographe né à Tolède en Espagne, il discute la possibilité du mouvement de la Terre. Comme d’autres, ses écrits seront connus des Européens du XVIe et XVIIe siècle. Il conçoit des astrolabes, et établit les Tables de Tolède, qui furent utilisées par les grands navigateurs occidentaux comme Christophe Colomb, et serviront de base aux Tables alphonsines. Il établit que l’excentricité du Soleil varie, plus exactement que le centre du cercle sur lequel tourne le Soleil s’éloigne ou se rapproche périodiquement de la Terre. Un cratère de la Lune porte son nom, ainsi qu’un pont de Tolède sur le Tage.
  • Omar Al-Khayyam (1048-1131).
    Connu pour sa poésie, il s’intéresse aussi à l’astronomie et aux mathématiques. Il devient directeur de l’observatoire d’Ispahan en 1074. Il crée de nouvelles tables astronomiques encore plus précises, et détermine la durée de l’année solaire avec une grande précision, au vu des instruments utilisés. Elle est plus exacte que l’année grégorienne, créée cinq siècles plus tard en Europe. Il réforme le calendrier persan en y introduisant une année bissextile (réforme Djelaléenne). En mathématiques, il s’intéresse aux équations du troisième degré en démontrant qu’elles peuvent avoir plusieurs solutions (il en trouve certaines géométriquement). Il écrit plusieurs textes sur l’extraction des racines cubiques, et un traité d’algèbre.
  • Al-Tûsî (1201-1274).
    Astronome et mathématicien, né à Tus dans l’Iran actuel, il fit construire et dirigea l’observatoire de Maragha. Il étudie les travaux de Al-Khayyam sur les proportions, s’intéresse à la géométrie.Côté astronomie, il commente l’Almageste et le complète, comme plusieurs astronomes (Al-Battani…) avant lui. Il estime l’obliquité de l’écliptique à 23°30’.
  • Al-Kashi (1380-1439).
    Mathématicien et astronome perse, il assiste à une éclipse de Lune en 1406 et rédige plusieurs ouvrages astronomiques par la suite. C’est à Samarcande qu’il passe le reste de sa vie, sous la protection du prince Ulugh Beg (1394-1449) qui y a fondé une université. Il devient le premier directeur du nouvel observatoire de Samarcande. Ses tables astronomiques proposent des valeurs à 4 (5 selon les sources) chiffres en notation sexagésimale de la fonction sinus. Il donne la manière de passer d’un système de coordonnées à un autre. Son catalogue contient 1018 étoiles. Il améliore les tables des éclipses et de visibilité de la Lune. Dans son traité sur le cercle, il obtient une valeur approchée de Pi avec 9 positions exactes en notation sexagésimale, soit 16 décimales exactes ! Un record, puisque la prochaine amélioration de l’estimation de Pi date du XVIe siècle avec 20 décimales. Il laisse son nom à une généralisation du théorème de Pythagore aux triangles quelconques. C’est le théorème d’Al-Kashi. Il introduit les fractions décimales, et acquiert une grande renommée qui fait de lui le dernier grand mathématicien astronome arabe, avant que l’occident ne prenne le relai.
  • Ulugh Beg (1394-1449).
    Petit fils de Tamerlan, prince des Timourides (descendants de Tamerlan). Vice-roi dès 1410, il accède au trône en 1447. C’est un remarquable savant et un piètre politicien, charge qu’il délègue pour s’adonner à la science. Son professeur est Qadi-zadeh Roumi (1364-1436) qui développe chez lui le goût pour les mathématiques et l’astronomie. Il fait bâtir plusieurs écoles dont une à Samarcande en 1420 où il enseigne, et un observatoire en 1429. Il y travaille avec quelque 70 mathématiciens et astronomes (dont Al-Kashi) pour rédiger les Tables sultaniennes parues en 1437 et améliorées par Ulugh Beg lui-même peu avant sa mort en 1449. La précision de ces tables restera inégalée pendant plus de 200 ans, et elles furent utilisées en occident. Elles contiennent les positions de plus de 1000 étoiles. Leur première traduction date d’environ l’an 1500, et fut réalisée à Venise.
  • Taqi Al-Din (1526-1585).
    Après une période où il est théologien, il devient astronome officiel du sultan à Istanbul. Il y construit un observatoire dont le but est de concurrencer ceux des pays européens, dont celui de Tycho Brahé. L’observatoire est ouvert en 1577. Il dresse les tables « Zij » (La perle intacte). Il est le premier à utiliser la notation à virgule, plutôt que les traditionnelles fractions sexagésimales en usage. Il observe et décrit une comète, et prévoit qu’elle est le signe de la victoire de l’armée ottomane. Cette vision se révèle fausse, et l’observatoire est détruit en 1580… Il se consacre ensuite à la mécanique, et décrit le fonctionnement d’un moteur à vapeur rudimentaire, invente une pompe à eau, et se passionne pour les horloges et l’optique.

L’astronome Taqi Al-Din (1525-1585) et ses collègues dans l’observatoire d’Istanbul. Manuscrit de 1581, Bibliothèque Topka, Istanbul.

La destruction de l’observatoire d’Istanbul marque la fin de l’activité astronomique arabe du moyen-âge. Il faudra attendre la révolution copernicienne pour voir de nouveaux progrès, et quels progrès ! Copernic et ses successeurs se sont certainement fortement inspirés des résultats des Arabes par l’entremise de leurs ouvrages. Les voyages et les contacts directs entre scientifiques de l’époque étaient rares.

Les occidentaux ne comprenant pas l’arabe, ce sont les traductions en latin qui ont probablement influencé l’Occident, avec, il faut le reconnaître, les ouvrages de certains philosophes grecs qui avaient remis en cause la position centrale de la Terre, comme Aristarque de Samos l’avait proposé vers -280.

Les observatoires arabes

Maquette de l’Observatoire de Samarcande construit en 1420 par Ulugh Beg. A l’intérieur, avec un rayon de 40 mètres, le plus grand quadrant de 90° jamais vu. Profondément enroché afin de réduire les conséquences des séismes, l’arc est constitué de deux parapets de marbre gradués en degrés et en minutes. Il se prolongeait à l’origine jusqu’au sommet d’un édifice de trois étages.

L’observatoire moderne, dans sa conception, est un digne successeur des observatoires arabes de la fin du moyen-âge.

A l’inverse de l’observatoire privé des philosophes grecs, l’observatoire islamique est une institution astronomique spécialisée, avec ses propres locaux, du personnel scientifique, un travail d’équipes avec observateurs et théoriciens, un directeur et des programmes d’études.

Ils ont recours, comme aujourd’hui, à des instruments de plus en plus grands, afin d’améliorer constamment la précision des mesures.

Le premier de ces observatoires est construit à sous le règne d’Al-Ma’mûn (la Maison de la Sagesse) en Irak actuel au IXe siècle. Nous avons déjà parlé de l’observatoire de Ray, proche de Téhéran et deuxième ville de l’Empire abbasside après Bagdad, avec son monumental sextant mural datant de 994. Il faut y ajouter les observatoires de Tolède et Cordoue en Espagne, de Bagdad, d’Ispahan.

Enfin, celui de Marâgha au nord de l’Iran actuel, construit en 1259 avec les fonds prélevés pour entretenir les hôpitaux et les mosquées. Al-Tusi y travailla. Vint ensuite l’ère de l’observatoire de Samarcande, construit en 1420 par l’astronome Ulugh Beg (1394-1449), dont les vestiges ont été retrouvés en 1908 par une équipe russe.

Site de l’Observatoire de Marâgha aujourd’hui.

Conclusion

Destruction de Bagdad par les Mongols en 1258. Détail d’une miniature.

Bien plus que les croisades, ce seront les offensives mongoles qui ravageront des pans entiers de la civilisation arabo-musulmane.

A la grande satisfaction de certains Occidentaux, Gengis Khan (1155-1227, détruira les royaumes musulmans du Khwarezm (1218) et de la Sogdiane avec Boukhara et Samarcande (1220). La grande ville de Merv en 1221. En 1238, son fils s’emparera de Moscou, puis de Kiev. En 1240, la Pologne et la Hongrie seront envahies. En 1241, Vienne sera menacée. Avant de provoquer la chute de la Dynastie des Song du Sud en Chine (1273), les Mongols s’en prendront aux Abbassides. Ainsi, les Maisons de la Sagesse connurent une fin brutale le 12 février 1258 avec l’invasion des Mongols à Bagdad conduite par Hulagu (le petit fils de Gengis Khan), qui tua le dernier calife abbasside Al Mu’tassim (malgré sa capitulation) et détruisit la ville de Bagdad et son héritage culturel. Hulagu ordonna aussi de massacrer toute la famille du calife et tout son entourage.

Le mutazilisme fut interdit et la magnifique collection de livres et de manuscrits de la Maison de la Sagesse de Bagdad fut jetée dans l’eau boueuse du Tigre, qui devint noire pendant plusieurs jours à cause de l’encre des livres et manuscrits.

Les Mongols exterminèrent 24 000 savants et un nombre incalculable de livres furent perdus. Du mutazilisme, on ne connaissait plus sa doctrine que par les textes des théologiens traditionalistes qui l’avaient attaqué. Au XIXe siècle, la découverte des volumineux ouvrages d’Abdel al Jabbar Ibn Ahmad permirent de mieux comprendre l’importance de ce courant de pensée dans la formation de la théologie musulmane actuelle, qu’elle soit sunnite ou chiite.

Plus proche de nous, la guerre d’Irak de 2003 : jusqu’à cette date, ce pays était le plus grand éditeur mondial de publications scientifiques en langue arabe. A la suite du chaos provoqué par une guerre menée « pour la démocratie » et « contre le terrorisme », la Bibliothèque comme les Archives nationales furent pillées et incendiées.

Idem pour la Bibliothèque centrale des legs pieux, la Bibliothèque de l’université irakienne des Sciences, ainsi que de nombreuses bibliothèques publiques à Bagdad, Mossoul et Bassorah. Il en fut de même pour les trésors archéologiques du Musée irakien et sa bibliothèque.

Il faut croire que certains ont déclaré la guerre à la civilisation.

1917. Alors que Français et Allemands s’entre-tuent dans les tranchés, les troupes de sa Majesté s’emparent de Bagdad et surtout des hydrocarbures dont le contrôle était incontournable pour préserver l’hégémonie d’Empire Britannique.

Chronologie sommaire :

  • 310-230 av. JC., vie de l’astronome grec Aristarque de Samos ;
  • 190-120 av. JC., vie de l’astronome grec Hipparque de Nicée ;
  • v. 100-160 après J.-C. : vie de l’astronome romain Claude Ptolémée ;
  • 700-748 : vie de Wasil ibn Ata, fondateur du mutazilisme ;
  • 750 : début de la dynastie des Abbassides ;
  • 751 : victoire abbasside contre les Chinois à la bataille de Talas (Kirghistan) ;
  • 763 : fondation de Bagdad par le calife Al-Mansur ;
  • 780 : Timothée Ier, patriarche de l’église nestorienne chrétienne à Bagdad ;
  • 780-850 : vie du mathématicien arabe al-Kwarizmi ;
  • 786 à 809 : califat pendant 23 ans d’Haroun al-Rachîd, héros légendaire des contes des Mille et Une Nuits. Développement du mutazilisme ;
  • 801-873 : vie du philosophe mutaziliste et platonicien Al-Kindi ;
  • 805-880 : vie d’Al-Farghani , traité sur l’Astrolabe ;
  • 813-833 : califat d’Al-Ma’mûn (20 ans) ;
  • 829 : création du premier observatoire astronomique permanent à Bagdad suivi par celui de Damas ;
  • 832 : création de la bibliothèque publique et création des Maisons de la Sagesse ;
  • 833 : peu avant sa mort, Al-Ma’mûn décrète le Coran créé et fait adopter le mutazilisme comme doctrine officielle des Abbassides ;
  • 836 : transfert de la capitale à Samarra ;
  • 848 : les mutazilites écartés de la cour de Bagdad ;
  • 858-930 : vie d’Al-Battani, dit Albatenius ;
  • 865-925 : vie du traducteur et médecin Sahl Rabban al-Tabari ;
  • 869-883 : révolte des Zanj (esclaves noirs de Zanzibar) ;
  • 892 : retour de la capitale des Abbassides à Bagdad ;
  • 965-1039 : vie d’Ibn Al-Haytam, dit Alhazen ;
  • 973-1048 : vie d’Al-Biruni ;
  • 1095 : première croisade ;
  • 1258 : Bagdad saccagée par les Mongoles ;
  • 1259 : création de l’Observatoire astronomique de Marâgha (Iran) ;
  • 1304-1375 : vie d’Ibn Al-Shâtir ;
  • 1422 : création de l’Observatoire astronomique de Samarcande, capitale de la Sogdiane ;
  • 1543 : l’astronome polonais Nicolas Copernic publie son De Revolutionibus ;
  • 1917 : entrée des troupes britanniques à Bagdad ;
  • 2003 : pillage et destruction par des incendies systématiques des bibliothèques et musées lors de la guerre d’Irak.

Bibliographie :

  • Mutazilisme, site de l’Association pour la renaissance de l’islam mutazilite (ARIM) ;
  • Antoine Le Bail, Qui sont les mutazilites, parfois appelés les « rationalistes » de l’islam ?, site de l’Institut du Monde Arabe (IMA), Paris ;
  • Richard C. Martin, Mark R. Woodward with Dwi S. Atmaja, Defenders of Reason in Islam, Mu’tazilism from Medieval School to Modern Symbol, Oneworld, Oxford, 1997 ;
  • Nadim Michel Kalife, Les lumières des premiers siècles de l’islam, sur le site de financialafrik.com, 2019 ; 
  • Mahmoud Azab, Une vision de l’universalité de la civilisation arabo-islamique, Université Oberta de Catalunya, www.uoc.edu ;
  • Sabine Schmidke, The People of Monotheism and Justice : Mutazilism in Islam and Judaism, Institute for Advanced Study, 2017 ;
  • Malek Chebel, L’esclavage en terre d’Islam, Fayard, Paris 2012 ;
  • Jacques Cheminade, Sublimes paroles et idioties de Nasr Eddin Hodja ;
  • Jacques Cheminade, Propositions pour un dialogue inter-religieux ;
  • Hussein Askary : Baghdad 767-1258 A.D., Melting Pot for a Universal Renaissance, Executive Intelligence Review, 2013 ;
  • Hussein Askary : La beauté de la Renaissance islamique, l’horloge éléphant, site de S&P;
  • Dr Subhi Al-Azzawi, La Maison de la Sagesse des Abbassides à Bagdad ou les débuts de l’Université, pdf sur internet ;
  • Dimitri Gutas, Pensée grecque, culture arabe. Le mouvement de traduction gréco-arabe à Bagdad et la société abbasside primitive (IIe-IV/VIIIe-Xe siècles), Aubier, Paris 2005 ;
  • Jim Al-Khalili, The House of Wisdom, How Arab Science Saved Ancient Knowledge and Gave Us the Renaissance, Pinguin, Londres 2010 ;
  • Jonathan Lyons, The House of Wisdom, How the Arabs Transformed Western Civilization, Bloomsbury, Londres 2009 ;
  • Pasteur Georges Tartar, Dialogue islamo-chrétien sous le calife Al-Ma’mûn, Les épitres d’Al-Hashimi et d’Al-Kindî, Nouvelles Editions Latines, Paris, 1985 ;
  • Al-Kindî, On First Philosophy, State University of New York Press, Albany, 1974 ;
  • Marie Thérèse d’Alverny, La transmission des textes philosophique et scientifiques au Moyen Âge, Variorum, Aldershot 1994 ;
  • Danielle Jacquart, Françoise Micheau, La médecine arabe et l’Occident médiéval, Maisonneuve, Paris 1990 ;
  • Juan Vernet Gines, Ce que la culture doit aux Arabes d’Espagne, Sindbad, Actes Sud, Paris, 2000 ;
  • Karen Armstrong, Islam, A Short History, Phoenix, London, 2002 ;
  • Muriel Mirak Weisbach, Andalousie, une porte vers la Renaissance ;
  • Régis Morelon, L’astronomie arabe orientale entre le VIIIe et le XIe siècle, dans Histoire des sciences arabes, sous la direction de Roshdi Rashed, Vol. 1, Astronomie, théorique et appliqué, Seuil, Paris, 1997 ;
  • George Saliba, Les théories planétaires en astronomie arabe après le XIe siècle, dans Histoire des sciences arabes, sous la direction de Roshdi Rashed, Vol. 1, Astronomie, théorique et appliqué, Seuil, Paris, 1997 ;
  • Roshi Rashed, L’optique géométrique, dans Histoire des sciences arabes, sous la direction de Roshdi Rashed, Vol. 2, Mathématiques et physique, Seuil, Paris, 1997 ;
  • Jean-Pierre Verdet, Une histoire de l’astronomie, Seuil, Paris, 1990 ;
  • J. P. Maratray, L’astronomie arabe, sur le site Astrosurf.com ;
  • Jean-Pierre Luminet, Ulugh Beg – L’astronome de Samarcande, 2018 ;
  • Kitty Ferguson, Pythagoras, His Lives and the Legacy of a Rational Universe, Walker publishing Company, New York, 2008 ;
  • Sir Thomas Heath, Aristarchus of Samos, The Ancient Copernicus, Dover, New York, 1981 :
  • A. Papadopoulo, L’Islam et l’art musulman, L’art des grandes civilisations, Mazenod, Paris, 1976 ;
  • Olag Grabar, Art et culture dans le monde islamique, Arts & Civilisations de l’Islam, Köneman, Cologne, 2000 ;
  • Christiane Gruber, Les images de Mahomet dans l’Islam, Afkar/Idées, Printemps 2015 ;
  • Hans Belting, Florence & Baghdad, Renaissance art and Arab science, Harvard University Press, 2011 ;
  • Dominique Raynaud, Ibn al-Haytham sur la vision binoculaire : un précurseur de l’optique physiologique, Arabic Sciences and Philosophy, Cambridge University Press (CUP), 2003, 13, pp.79-99 ;
  • Jonathan M. Bloom, Paper Before Print : The History and Impact of Paper in the Islamic World, Yale University Press, 2001 ;
  • Karel Vereycken, Jan Van Eyck, un peintre flamand dans l’optique arabe, site de S&P ;

NOTES:

  1. Une théodicée ou « justice de Dieu ») est une explication de l’apparente contradiction entre l’existence du mal et deux caractéristiques propres à Dieu : sa toute-puissance et sa bonté.
  2. Sumer. Le milieu naturel du pays sumérien n’était pas vraiment favorable au développement d’une agriculture productive : des sols pauvres avec une teneur élevée en sels néfastes à la croissance des plantes, des températures moyennes très élevées, des précipitations insignifiantes, et des crues des fleuves venant à l’automne, au moment des moissons, et non pas au printemps quand les graines en auraient besoin pour germer, comme c’est le cas en Égypte. Ce sont donc l’ingéniosité et l’incessant labeur des agriculteurs mésopotamiens qui permirent à ce pays de devenir l’un des greniers à céréales du Moyen-Orient antique. Dès le VIe millénaire, les communautés paysannes élaborèrent un système d’irrigation qui progressivement se ramifia jusqu’à couvrir un grand espace, profitant par là de l’avantage que leur offrait le relief extrêmement plat du delta mésopotamien, où il n’y avait aucun obstacle naturel à l’extension des canaux d’irrigation sur des dizaines de kilomètres. En régulant le niveau des eaux dérivées des cours d’eau naturels pour l’adapter aux besoins des cultures, et en mettant au point des techniques visant à limiter la salinisation des sols (lessivage des champs, pratique de la jachère), il fut possible d’obtenir des rendements céréaliers très élevés.
  3. Le Khorassan est une région située dans le nord-est de l’Iran. Le nom vient du persan et signifie « d’où vient le soleil ». Il a été donné à la partie orientale de l’empire sassanide. Le Khorassan est également considéré comme le nom médiéval de l’Afghanistan par les Afghans. En effet, ce territoire englobait l’Afghanistan actuel, ainsi que le sud du Turkménistan, de l’Ouzbékistan et du Tadjikistan.
  4. Au Xe siècle, dans son Livre des secrets, le savant perse Mohammad Al-Razi décrit la distillation du pétrole permettant d’obtenir du pétrole d’éclairage.
  5. Le sanskrit est une langue de l’Inde, parmi les plus anciennes langues indo-européennes connues (plus ancienne même que le latin et le grec). C’est notamment la langue des textes religieux hindous et, à ce titre, elle continue d’être utilisée comme langue culturelle, à la manière du latin aux siècles passés en Occident.
  6. Le pehlevi ou moyen-perse est une langue iranienne qui était parlée à l’époque sassanide. Elle descend du vieux perse. Le moyen perse était habituellement écrit en utilisant l’écriture pehlevi. La langue était aussi écrite à l’aide du script manichéen par les manichéens de Perse.
  7. Abu Muhammad al–Qasim ibn ’Ali al–Hariri (1054–1122), homme de lettres, poète et philologue arabe, naquit près de Bassora, en Irak actuel. Il est connu pour ses Serments et ses maqâmât (littéralement modes, souvent traduits par assemblées ou séances), recueil de 50 courts récits mêlant le commentaire social et moral aux expressions éclatantes de la langue arabe. Si le genre de la maqâmat fut créé par Badi’al–Zaman al–Hamadhani (969–1008), ce sont les séances d’al–Hariri qui le définissent le mieux. Écrites dans un style de prose rimée appelée saj’ et entrelacées de vers raffinés, les histoires se veulent divertissantes et éducatives. Chacune des anecdotes se déroule dans une ville différente du monde musulman à l’époque d’Al-Hariri. Elles racontent une rencontre, généralement lors d’un rassemblement de citadins, entre deux personnages fictifs : le narrateur al-Harith ibn Hammam et le protagoniste Abu Zayd al-Saruji. Au fil des siècles, l’ouvrage fut copié et commenté à de nombreuses reprises, mais seuls 13 exemplaires existant encore aujourd’hui possèdent des enluminures illustrant des scènes des histoires. Les miniatures, reconnues pour leur représentation saisissante de la vie musulmane au XIIIe siècle, sont considérées comme les peintures arabes les plus anciennes créées par un artiste dont l’identité est connue. La popularité quasi immédiate des maqâmât parvint jusqu’à l’Espagne arabe, où le rabbin Juda al-Harizi (1165-vers 1225) traduisit les séances en hébreu sous le titre Mahberoth Itiel et composa par la suite ses propres Tahkemoni, ou séances hébraïques.
  8. Les Barmécides ou Barmakides sont les membres d’une famille de la noblesse persane originaire de Balkh en Bactriane (au nord de l’Afghanistan). Cette famille de religieux bouddhistes (paramaka désigne en sanskrit le supérieur d’un monastère bouddhiste) devenus zoroastriens puis convertis à l’islam a fourni de nombreux vizirs aux califes abbassides. Les Barmécides avaient acquis une réputation remarquable de mécènes et sont considérés comme les principaux instigateurs de la brillante culture qui se développa alors à Bagdad.
  9. La thèse christologique de Nestorius (né vers 381 — mort en 451), patriarche de Constantinople (428-431), a été déclaré hérétique et condamnée par le concile d’Éphèse. Pour Nestorius, deux hypostases, l’une divine, l’autre humaine, coexistent en Jésus-Christ. A partir de l’Église d’Orient, le nestorianisme est une des formes historiquement les plus influentes du christianisme dans le monde durant toute la fin de l’Antiquité et au Moyen Âge, jusqu’en Inde, en Chine et en Mongolie.
  10. Le syriaque (une forme d’araméen, la langue du Christ) est à côté du latin et du grec la troisième composante du christianisme ancien, ancrée dans l’hellénisme mais également descendante de l’antiquité proche-orientale et sémitique. Dès les premiers siècles, dans un mouvement symétrique à celui de la tradition chrétienne gréco-latine vers l’ouest, le christianisme syriaque s’est développé vers l’est, jusqu’en Inde et en Chine. Le syriaque est toujours aujourd’hui, la langue liturgique et classique (un peu comme le latin en Europe) des Églises syriaque orthodoxe, syriaque catholique, assyrienne, chaldéenne et maronite, au Liban, en Syrie, en Irak et en Inde du sud-ouest. Enfin, c’est la branche du christianisme la plus en contact avec l’islam au sein duquel il a continué à vivre.
  11. En Asie du Sud-Ouest, l’influence grecque restait vivace dans plusieurs villes sous influence chrétienne : Edesse (devenue Urfa en Turquie), à l’époque capitale du comté d’Edesse, l’un des premiers Etats latins d’Orient, le plus avancé dans le monde islamique ; Antioche (devenue Antakya en Turquie) ; Nisibe (aujourd’hui Nusaybin en Turquie) ; Al-Mada’in (c’est-à-dire « Les villes »), une métropole irakienne sur le Tigre, entre les villes royales Ctesiphon et Séleucie du Tigre ; Gondichapour (aujourd’hui en Iran) dont restent les ruines. A cela il faut ajouter les villes de Lattaquié (en Syrie) et d’Amed (aujourd’hui Diyarbakir en Turquie) où existaient des centres jacobites (chrétiens d’Orient, mais membres de l’Église syriaque orthodoxe, à ne pas confondre avec les Nestoriens).
  12. L’Académie de Gondischapour était située dans l’actuelle province du Khuzestan, dans le sud-ouest de l’Iran, près de la rivière Karoun. Elle proposait l’enseignement de la médecine, de la philosophie, de la théologie et des sciences. Le corps professoral était versé non seulement dans les traditions zoroastriennes et perses, mais enseignait aussi les langues grecques et indiennes. L’Académie comprenait une bibliothèque, un observatoire, et le plus ancien hôpital d’enseignement connu. Selon les historiens le Cambridge de l’Iran, c’était le centre médical le plus important de l’ancien monde (défini comme le territoire de l’Europe, de la Méditerranée et du Proche-Orient) au cours des VIe et VIIe siècles.
  13. Le sogdien est une langue moyenne iranienne parlée au Moyen Âge par les Sogdiens, peuple commerçant qui résidait en Sogdiane, la région historique englobant Samarcande et Boukhara et recouvrant plus ou moins les actuels Ouzbékistan, Tadjikistan et nord de l’Afghanistan. Avant l’arrivée de l’arabe, le sogdien fut la lingua franca de la Route de la Soie. Les commerçants sogdiens s’installent en Chine et les moines sogdiens sont parmi les premiers à y diffuser le Bouddhisme. Dès le VIe siècle, les dirigeants chinois ont fait appel à l’élite sogdienne pour résoudre les problèmes diplomatiques, commerciaux, militaires et même culturels, ce qui a incité de nombreux Sogdiens à migrer d’Asie centrale et des régions frontalières de la Chine vers les grands centres politiques chinois.
  14. Le Livre des machines ingénieux contient une centaine de machines ou d’objets, la plupart dus aux frères Banou Moussa ou adaptés par eux : entonnoir, vilebrequin, vannes à boisseau conique, robinet à flotteur et autres systèmes de régulation hydraulique, masque à gaz et soufflet de ventilation pour les mines ; drague, fontaines à jet variable, lampe-tempête, lampe à arrêt automatique, à alimentation automatique ; instruments de musique automatiques dont une flûte programmable.
  15. Ephémérides astronomiques : registres de positions d’astres à intervalles réguliers.
  16. Ibn Al-Haytam. En 2007, lors d’une conférence à la Sorbonne, j’ai exploré l’emploi, par le peintre flamand Jan Van Eyck (début du XVe siècle), d’une perspective géométrique bifocale, qualifiée à tort de « primitive », d’erronée et d’intuitive, en réalité inspirée des travaux et des expériences binoculaires du savant arabe Ibn Al-Haytam (Alhazen). Ce dernier s’appuya sur les travaux de ses prédécesseurs Al-Kindi, Ibn Luca et Ibn Sahl. Alhazen fut largement connus en Occident grâce aux traductions des franciscains de l’Université d’Oxford (Grosseteste, Bacon, etc.). Voir biographie sommaire.

Merci de partager !
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

La Route de la soie maritime, une histoire de mille et une coopérations

Reconstruction à l’identique d’un des navires figurant sur les bas-reliefs du temple bouddhiste de Bonobudur datant du VIIIe siècle en Indonésie.

Il est de bon ton aujourd’hui de présenter les enjeux maritimes dans le cadre d’une l’idéologie géopolitique britannique moribonde dressant les pays et les peuples les uns contre les autres.

Cependant, comme le démontre cette brève histoire de la Route de la soie maritime, tirée pour l’essentiel d’un document de l’organisation internationale du tourisme, l’océan a été avant tout un lieu fantastique de rencontres fertiles, de brassages culturels et de coopérations mutuellement bénéfiques.

Les anciens Chinois ont inventé beaucoup de choses que nous utilisons de nos jours, notamment le papier, les allumettes, les brouettes, la poudre à canon, la noria (élévateur), les écluses à sas, le cadran solaire, l’astronomie, la porcelaine, la peinture laque, la roue de potier, les feux d’artifice, la monnaie de papier, la boussole, le gouvernail d’étambot, le tangram, le sismographe, les dominos, la corde à sauter, les cerfs-volants, la cérémonie du thé, le parapluie pliable, l’encre, la calligraphie, le harnais pour animaux, les jeux de cartes, l’impression, le boulier, le papier peint, l’arbalète, la crème glacée, et surtout la soie dont nous aller parler ici.

Soie chinoise.

Origine de la soie

Avant de parler des « routes » de la soie, deux mots sur les origines de la sériciculture, c’est-à-dire l’élevage de vers à soie.

Comme le confirment des découvertes archéologiques récentes, la production de la soie représente un savoir-faire ancestral. La présence du mûrier pour l’élevage du ver à soie a été constatée en Chine autour du fleuve jaune chez la culture de Yangshao lors du néolithique moyen chinois de 4500 à 3000 av. JC.

En général, on préfère retenir la légende qui affirme que la soie a été découverte vers 2500 ans avant J.C., par la princesse chinoise Si Ling-chi, lorsqu’un cocon tomba accidentellement dans son bol de thé. En essayant de le retirer, elle s’aperçut que le cocon ramolli par l’eau chaude déployait un fil délicat, doux et solide pouvant être dévidé et assemblé. Ainsi serait née l’idée de confectionner des étoffes. La princesse décida alors de planter de nombreux mûriers blancs dans son jardin pour élever des vers à soie.

Cycle de reproduction du ver à soie.

Les vers à soie (ou bombyx) et les mûriers furent divinement bien soignés par la princesse (les vers à soie se nourrissent uniquement de feuilles de mûriers blancs).

La production de soie est un processus long qui nécessite une grande surveillance. Les papillons de soie pondent environs 500 œufs au cours de leurs vies, qui est de 4 à 6 jours. Après éclosion des œufs, les bébés vers se nourrissent de feuilles de mûrier dans un environnement contrôlé. Ils ont un féroce appétit et leur poids peut considérablement augmenter. Après avoir emmagasiné suffisamment d’énergie, les vers sécrètent par leurs glandes de la soie une gelée blanche et s’en servent pour réaliser un cocon autour d’eux.

Après huit ou neuf jours, les vers sont tués et les cocons sont plongés dans de l’eau bouillante afin d’assouplir les filaments de protection qui sont enroulés sur une bobine. Ces filaments peuvent être de 600 à 900 mètres de long. Plusieurs filaments sont assemblés pour former un fil. Les fils de soie sont alors tissé pour former une toile ou utilisée pour de la broderie fine ou encore le brocart, riche tissu de soie rehaussé de dessins brochés en fils d’or et d’argent.

Le début du commerce de la soie

Sous la menace de la peine capitale, la sériciculture resta un secret bien gardé et la Chine conservera durant des millénaires son monopole sur la fabrication.

Ce n’est que sous la dynastie des Zhou (1112 av. JC.), qu’une Route de la soie maritime va desservir à partir de la Chine le Japon et la Corée car le gouvernement décide d’y envoyer, depuis le port situé dans la baie de Bohai (de la Péninsule de Shandong), des Chinois chargés de former les habitants à la sériciculture et l’agriculture. C’est ainsi que les techniques d’élevage du vers à soie, du bobinage et du tissage de la soie ont, peu à peu, été introduites en Corée via la mer Jaune.

Lorsque l’empereur Qin Shi Huang unifie la Chine (221 av. JC.), de nombreuses personnes des États de Qi, Yan et Zhao s’enfuient vers la Corée en emportant, avec eux, des vers à soie et leur technique d’élevage. Ceci va accélérer le développement de la filature de la soie dans ce pays.

Pour les relations internationales de la Chine, la Corée a joué un rôle central en particulier comme un pont intellectuel entre la Chine et le Japon. Son commerce avec la Chine a également permis la divulgation du bouddhisme et des méthodes de fabrication de la porcelaine.

Bien qu’initialement réservé à la Cour impériale, la soie s’est répandu à travers toute la culture asiatique, aussi bien géographiquement que socialement. La soie devient rapidement le tissu de luxe par excellence que la terre entière désire.

A l’époque des dynasties Han (206 av. JC à 220), un canevas dense de routes commerciales fait exploser les échanges culturels et commerciaux à travers l’Asie centrale et impacte profondément la dynamique civilisationnelle. La dynastie des Han continue la construction de la grande muraille et crée notamment la commanderie de Dunhuang (Gansu), poste clé de la Route de la soie. Son commerce s’étend, plus de deux siècles av. JC, jusqu’à la Grèce puis Rome où la soie est réservée aux élites.

Au IIIe siècle, l’Inde, le Japon et la Perse (Iran) réussissent à percer le secret de la fabrication de la soie et deviennent d’importants producteurs.

La soie arrive en Europe

L’élevage du ver à soie, dit-on, aurait débuté en Europe au VIe siècle grâce à deux moines du Mont Athos, envoyés par l’empereur byzantin Justinien. Ils ont rapporté de Chine ou d’Inde, des œufs de vers à soie cachés dans leur bâton de pèlerin en bambou creux. Une autre version prétend que ce serait l’empereur Han Wu (IIe siècle) qui envoya des ambassadeurs, munis de présents tel que la soie, vers l’occident. L’élevage se répandit d’abord dans l’empire byzantin qui en conserva le secret.

Au VIIe siècle, la sériciculture se répand en Afrique et en Sicile où, sous l’impulsion de Roger Ier de Sicile (v. 1034-1101) et de son fils Roger II (1093-1154), le ver à soie et le mûrier furent introduits dans l’ancien Péloponnèse.

Au Xe siècle, l’Andalousie devient l’épicentre de la fabrication de la soie avec Grenade, Tolède et Séville. Lors de la conquête arabe, la sériciculture passa en Espagne, en Italie (Venise, Florence et Milan) et en France.

Les plus anciennes traces françaises d’une activité séricicole remontent au XIIIe siècle, notamment dans le Gard (1234) et à Paris (1290).

Au XVe siècle, face à l’importation ruineuse de la soie (brute ou manufacturée) italiennes, Louis XI essaye de créer des manufactures de soieries, d’abord à Tours sur la Loire, en ensuite à Lyon, une ville au carrefour des routes nord-sud où les émigrants italiens pratiquaient déjà le commerce de soieries.

Au XIXe siècle, la production de la soie a été industrialisée au Japon mais au XXe siècle, la Chine reprend sa place comme le plus grand producteur mondial. Aujourd’hui, l’Inde, le Japon, la République de Corée, la Thaïlande, le Vietnam, l’Ouzbékistan et le Brésil ont des grosses capacités de production.

Brassage culturel

Autant que la soie elle-même, le transport de la soie par voie maritime remonte à des âges immémoriaux.

Pour les Chinois, il existe deux principales routes : la Route de la Soie de la Mer orientale de Chine (vers la Corée et le Japon) et la Route de la Soie de la Mer méridionale de Chine (via le détroit de Malacca vers l’Inde, le golfe Persique, l’Afrique et l’Europe). Royaume du Fou-Nan

Au Vietnam, le musée de Hanoï possède une pièce de monnaie datant de l’an 152 arborant l’effigie de l’empereur romain Antonin le Pieux. Cette pièce a été découverte dans les vestiges d’Oc Eo, une ville vietnamienne située au sud du delta du Mékong, qu’on pense avoir été le port principal du Royaume du Fou-nan (Ier au IXe siècle).

Ce royaume, qui couvrait le territoire du Cambodge actuel et de la région administrative vietnamienne du delta du Mékong, a prospéré du Ier au IXe siècle. Or, la première mention du royaume du Fou-nan, apparait dans le compte rendu d’une mission chinoise qui s’y est rendue au IIIe siècle.

Les Founamiens furent à la gloire de leur puissance lorsque l’hindouisme et le bouddhisme furent introduits en Asie du Sud-Est.

Ensuite, à partir de l’Egypte, des marchands grecs ont atteint la baie de Bengale. Des quantités considérables de poivre atteignent alors Ostia, le port d’entrée de Rome. Toutes les preuves historiques démontrent que le commerce est-ouest fleurissait dès notre premier millénaire.

Perses et Arabes en Asie

Empire des Sassanides.

Du coté occidental, à l’entrée de la baie de Koweït, à 20 kilomètres au large de la ville de Koweït City, non loin du débouché de l’estuaire commun du Tigre et de l’Euphrate dans le golfe Persique, l’île de Failaka a été l’un des lieux de rendez-vous où la Grèce, Rome et la Chine échangeaient leurs marchandises.

Sous la dynastie des Sassanides (226-651), les Perses ont développé leurs routes commerciales jusqu’en Asie du Sud-est en passant par l’Inde et le Sri Lanka. Cette infrastructure commerciale fut reprise ensuite par les Arabes lorsqu’en 762 ils déplacèrent la capitale Omeyyade de Damas à Bagdad.

Les présidents chinois et indien, Xi Jinping et Narendra Modi, explorant le fonctionnement de la roue à tisser, fruit des échanges entre Arabes, Indiens et Chinois.
Dhow arabe.

Ainsi, la ville de Quilon (Kollam), la capitale du Kerala en Inde, voit cohabiter dès le IXe siècle des colonies de marchands arabes, chrétiens, juifs et chinois.

Du coté occidental, les navigateurs perses et ensuite arabes ont joué un rôle central dans la naissance de la route de la soie maritime. A la suite des routes sassanides, les Arabes poussaient leurs dhows, c’est-à-dire les boutres ou voiliers arabes traditionnels, de la mer Rouge aux côtes chinoises et jusqu’aux confins de la Malaisie et de l’Indonésie.

Ces marins apportèrent avec eux une nouvelle religion, l’islam qui s’étendra en Asie du Sud-Est. Si initialement le pèlerinage traditionnel (le hajj) vers la Mecque ne fut qu’une aspiration pour de nombreux musulmans, il leur deviendra de plus en plus possible de l’effectuer.

Lors de la mousson, la saison où les vents sont favorables à la navigation vers l’Inde dans l’océan Indien, les missions commerciales semestrielles se transformaient en véritables foires internationales offrant du même coup une occasion pour transporter par la mer une grande quantité de marchandises dans des conditions (abstraction faite des pirates et de l’imprévisibilité du temps) relativement moins exposées aux dangers du transport par voie terrestre.

Chine : la Route de la soie maritime
sous les dynasties Sui, Tang et Song

Le pont de Luoyang, un chef-d’œuvre d’architecture ancienne à Quanzhou.

C’est sous la dynastie Sui (581-618), qu’en partance de Quanzhou, ville côtière dans la province du Fujian, dans le sud-est de la Chine, la Route de la soie maritime trace ses premiers itinéraires commerciaux.

Riche de sa panoplie d’endroits pittoresques et de sites historiques, Quanzhou a été proclamée « point de départ de la Route de la Soie maritime » par l’UNESCO.

C’est à cette époque que les premières méthodes d’imprimerie font leur apparition en Chine. Il s’agit de blocs de bois permettant d’imprimer sur du textile. En 593, l’Empereur Sui, Wen-ti, ordonna l’impression des images et des écrits bouddhiques. Un des plus anciens textes imprimés est un écrit bouddhiste datant de 868 retrouvé dans une grotte près de Dunhuang, une ville étape de la Route de la soie.

Sous la dynastie Tang (618-907), l’expansion militaire du Royaume apporta de la sécurité, du commerce et des idées nouvelles. Le fait que la stabilité de la Chine des Tang coïncide avec celle de la Perse des Sassanides, permet alors aux routes de la soie terrestres et maritimes de prospérer. La grande transformation de la route de la soie maritime aura lieu à partir du VIIe siècle lorsque la Chine s’ouvre de plus en plus aux échanges internationaux.
Le premier ambassadeur arabe y prend ses fonctions en 651.

Fresque murale exécuté en 706, du tombeau de l’Empereur Tang, avec des émissaires diplomatiques à la Cour impériale. Les deux figures à droite, soigneusement habillés, y représentent la Corée, celui au milieu, (un moine ?) sans couvre-chef et avec « un gros nez » l’Occident.

La Dynastie Tang choisit comme capitale la ville de Chang’an (appelé aujourd’hui Xi’an). Elle adopte une attitude ouverte vis-à-vis des différentes croyances. Des temples bouddhistes, taoïstes et confucéens y coexistent pacifiquement avec des mosquées, des synagogues et des églises nestoriennes chrétiennes.

Chang’an étant le terminus de la Route de la Soie, le marché ouest de Chang’an devient le centre du commerce mondial. Selon le registre de l’Autorité Six des Tang, plus de 300 nations et régions avaient des relations commerciales avec Chang’an.

Presque 10 000 familles de pays étrangers de l’ouest vivaient dans la ville, spécialement dans la zone autour du marché ouest. Il y avait beaucoup d’auberges étrangères dont le personnel était des servantes étrangères choisies pour leur beauté. Le poète le plus célèbre dans l’histoire Chinoise, Li Bai, flânait souvent parmi elles. La nourriture étrangère, les costumes, la musique étaient la mode de Chang’an.

Après la chute de la dynastie Tang, les Cinq dynasties et la période des dix royaumes (907-960), l’arrivée de la dynastie Song (960-1279) va inaugurer une nouvelle période faste caractérisée par une centralisation accrue et un renouveau économique et culturel. La route maritime de la soie retrouve alors de son allant. En 1168 une synagogue est érigée à Kaifeng, capitale de la dynastie Song du Sud, pour servir aux marchands de la route de la soie.

Durant la même période, de pair avec l’expansion de l’islam, des comptoirs commerciaux vont apparaître tout autour de l’océan Indien et dans le reste de l’Asie du Sud-est.

La Chine incite alors ses marchands à saisir les occasions qu’offre le trafic maritime, notamment la vente du camphre, une plante médicinale très recherchée. Un véritable réseau commercial se développe alors dans les Indes orientales sous les auspices du Royaume de Sriwijaya, une cité-Etat du sud de Sumatra en Indonésie (voir ci-dessous) qui fera pendant près de six siècles la jonction entre d’un coté les marchands chinois et de l’autre les Indiens et les Malais. Une route commerciale émerge alors réellement méritant le nom de « route de la soie » maritime.

Des quantités de plus en plus importantes d’épices passent alors par l’Inde, la mer Rouge et Alexandrie en Egypte avant d’atteindre les marchands de Gênes, Venise et les autres ports occidentaux. De là, ils repartiront vers les marchés du nord de l’Europe de Lübeck (Allemagne), Riga (Lituanie) ou encore Tallinn (Estonie), qui deviendront, à partir du XIIe siècle, des villes importantes de la Ligue hanséatique.

Après sept années de fouilles, plus de 60 000 objets en porcelaine datant de la Dynastie Song (960-1279) ont été découverts sur le navire Nanhai (mer de Chine méridionale) qui était resté sous l’eau depuis plus de 800 ans.
Jonque du XVe siècle de la dynastie Ming.

En Chine, sous le règne de l’empereur Song, Renzong (1022-1063), beaucoup d’argent et d’énergie furent dépensés pour réunir les savoirs et les savoir-faire. L’économie fut la première à en bénéficier.

En s’appuyant sur le savoir-faire des marins arabes et indiens, les navires chinois deviennent alors les plus avancés du monde.

Les Chinois, qui avaient inventé la boussole (au moins depuis l’an 1119), dépassèrent rapidement leurs concurrents au niveau de la cartographie et l’art de naviguer alors que la jonque chinoise devient le vraquier par excellence.

Dans son traité géographique, Zhou Qufei, en 1178, rapporte :

« Les gros navires qui croisent la Mer du sud sont comme des maisons. Lorsqu’ils déplient leurs voiles, on dirait d’énormes nuages. Leur gouvernail est long de plusieurs dizaines de pieds. Un seul navire peut abriter plusieurs centaines d’hommes. A bord, il y a de quoi manger pour un an ».

Des fouilles archéologiques confirment cette réalité comme par exemple l’épave d’une jonque datant du XIVe siècle, retrouvée aux larges de la Corée, dans laquelle on a découvert plus de 10 000 pièces de céramique.

Lors de cette période, le commerce côtier passe graduellement des mains des marchands arabes aux mains des marchands chinois. Le commerce s’étend, notamment grâce à l’inclusion de la Corée ainsi que l’intégration du Japon, de la côte indienne de Malabar, du golfe Persique et de la mer Rouge dans les réseaux commerciaux existants.

La Chine exporte du thé, de la soie, du coton, de la porcelaine, des laques, du cuivre, des colorants, des livres et du papier. En retour, elle importe des produits de luxe et des matières premières, notamment des bois rares, des métaux précieux, des pierres précieuses et semi-précieuses, des épices et de l’ivoire.

Des pièces de monnaie en cuivre de la période Song ont été découvertes au Sri Lanka, et la présence de la porcelaine de cette époque a été constatée en Afrique de l’Est, en Egypte, en Turquie, dans certains Etats du Golfe et en Iran, tout comme en Inde et en Asie du Sud-est.

L’importance de la Corée et du Royaume de Silla

Pendant le premier millénaire, la culture et la philosophie ont fleuri dans la péninsule Coréenne. Un réseau marchand bien organisé et bien protégé avec la Chine et le Japon y opérait.

Sur l’île japonaise d’Okino-shima on trouve de nombreuses traces historiques témoignant des échanges intenses entre l’archipel japonais, la Corée et le continent asiatique.

Des fouilles effectuées dans des tombeaux anciens à Gyeongju, aujourd’hui une ville sud-coréenne de 264 000 habitants et capitale de l’ancien Royaume de Silla (de 57 av. JC à 935) qui contrôlait la plus grande partie de la péninsule du VIIe au IXe siècle, démontrent l’intensité des échanges de ce royaume avec le reste du monde, via la route de la soie.

L’Indonésie, une grande puissance maritime au coeur de la Route de la soie maritime

En Indonésie, en Malaisie et dans le sud de la Thaïlande, le Royaume de Sriwijaya (VIIe au XIIIe) a joué le rôle majeur de comptoir maritime où furent entreposées des marchandises de forte valeur de la région et au-delà en vue de leur commercialisation ultérieure par voie maritime. Sriwijaya contrôlait notamment le détroit de Malacca, le passage maritime incontournable entre l’Inde et la Chine.

A l’apogée de sa puissance au XIe siècle, le réseau des ports et des comptoirs sous domination Sriwijaya échangèrent une vaste palette de produits et de productions : du riz, du coton, de l’indigo et de l’argent de Java, de l’aloès (une plante succulente d’origine africaine), des résines végétales, du camphre, de l’ivoire et des cornes de rhinocéros, de l’étain et de l’or de Sumatra, du rotin, des bois rouges et d’autres bois rares, des pierres précieuses de Bornéo, des oiseaux rares et des animaux exotiques, du fer, du santal et des épices d’Indonésie orientale, d’Inde et d’Asie du Sud-est, et enfin, de Chine, des porcelaines, des laques, du brocart, des tissues et de la soie.

Avec comme capitale la ville de Palembang (à ce jour 1,7 million d’habitants) sur la rivière Musi dans ce qui est aujourd’hui la province méridionale de Sumatra, ce royaume d’inspiration hindouiste et bouddhiste, qui a prospéré du VIIIe au XIIIe siècle, a été le premier royaume indonésien d’importance et la première puissance maritime indonésienne.

Dès le VIIe siècle, il règne sur une grande partie de Sumatra, la partie occidentale de l’île de Java et une partie importante de la péninsule malaise. Avec une étendue au Nord jusqu’en Thaïlande, où des vestiges archéologiques de cités Sriwijaya existent encore.

Le musée de Palembang — une ville où communautés chinoises, indiennes, arabes et yéménites, chacun avec ses institutions particulières, co-prospèrent depuis plusieurs générations — raconte à merveille comment la Route de la soie maritime a engendré un enrichissement culturel mutuel exemplaire.

Madagascar, le sanskrit et la Route de la cannelle

Carte de l’expansion des langues austronésiennes.

Aujourd’hui, Madagascar est habitée par des noirs et des asiatiques. Des tests ADN ont confirmé ce que l’on savait depuis longtemps : de nombreux habitants de l’île descendent de marins malais et indonésiens qui ont mis pied sur l’ile vers l’année 830 lorsque l’Empire Sriwijaya étend son influence maritime vers l’Afrique.

Autre élément de preuve de cette présence, le fait que la langue parlée sur l’île emprunte des mots sanskrits et indonésiens.

Sans surprise, la carte de l’expansion des langues austronésiennes est quasiment superposable à celle de la Route de la cannelle (ci-dessus).

Bas-relief du temple bouddhiste de Borobudur (VIIIe siècle, Indonésie).

Pour démontrer la faisabilité de ces voyages maritimes, une équipe de chercheurs a navigué en 2003 d’Indonésie jusqu’au Ghana en passant par Madagascar à bord du Borobudur, la reconstruction d’un des voiliers figurant dans plusieurs des 1300 bas-reliefs décorant le temple bouddhiste de Borobudur sur l’île de Java en Indonésie, datant du VIIIe siècle.

Beaucoup pensent que ce navire est une représentation de ceux que les marchands indonésiens utilisaient autrefois pour traverser l’océan jusqu’en Afrique. Les navigateurs indonésiens utilisaient habituellement des bateaux relativement petits. Pour en assurer l’équilibre, ils les équipaient de balanciers, aussi bien doubles (ngalawa) que simples.

Leurs bateaux, dont la coque était taillée dans un seul tronc d’arbre, étaient appelés sanggara. Dans leurs traversées vers l’est, les marchands de l’archipel indonésien pouvaient jadis se rendre jusqu’à Hawaii et la Nouvelle-Zélande, à une distance de plus de 7 000 km.

Sur la Route de la cannelle, le navire a fait le trajet d’Indonésie jusqu’à Accra au Ghana, en passant par Madagascar.

En tout cas, le bateau des chercheurs, équipé d’un mât de 18 mètres de haut, a réussi à parcourir la route Jakarta – Maldives – cap de Bonne-Espérance – Ghana, une distance de 27 750 kilomètres, soit plus de la moitié de la circonférence de la Terre !

L’expédition visait à refaire une route bien précise : celle de la cannelle, qui a conduit les marchands indonésiens jusqu’en Afrique pour vendre des épices, dont la cannelle, une denrée très recherchée à l’époque. Elle était déjà très prisée dans les régions du bassin méditerranéen bien avant l’ère chrétienne.

Sur les murs du temple égyptien de Deir el-Bahari (Louksor), une peinture représente une expédition navale importante dont il est dit qu’elle aurait été ordonnée par la reine Hatshepsout, qui régna de 1503 à 1482 avant JC.

Autour de cette peinture des hiéroglyphes expliquent que ces navires transportaient diverses espèces de plantes et d’essences odorantes destinées au culte. Une de ces denrées est la cannelle. Riche en arôme, elle était une composante importante des cérémonies rituelles dans les royaumes d’Egypte.

Or, la cannelle poussait à l’origine en Asie centrale, dans l’est de l’Himalaya et dans le nord du Vietnam. Les Chinois méridionaux l’ont transplantée de ces régions dans leur propre pays et l’ont cultivée sous le nom de gui zhi.

Carte de la route de la cannelle.

De la Chine, le gui zhi s’est répandu dans tout l’archipel indonésien, trouvant là une terre d’accueil très fertile, en particulier dans les îles Moluques. De fait, le commerce international de la cannelle était alors un monopole tenu par les marchands indonésiens. La cannelle d’Indonésie était appréciée pour son excellente qualité et son prix très compétitif.

Les Indonésiens parcouraient donc à la voile de grandes distances, jusqu’à plus de 8 000 km, traversant l’océan Indien jusqu’à Madagascar et le nord-est de l’Afrique. De Madagascar, les produits étaient transportés à Rhapta, dans une région côtière qui prit par la suite le nom de Somalie. Au-delà, les marchands arabes les expédiaient vers le nord jusqu’à la mer Rouge.

Le détroit de Malacca

Pour la Chine, le détroit de Malacca a toujours représenté un intérêt stratégique majeur. À l’époque où le grand amiral chinois Zheng He mène la première de ses expéditions vers l’Inde, le Proche-Orient et l’Afrique de l’Est entre 1405 et 1433, un pirate chinois du nom de Chen Zuyi a pris le contrôle de Palembang. Zheng He défait la flotte de Chen et capture les survivants. Du coup, le détroit est redevenu une route maritime sûre.

Selon la tradition, un prince de Sriwijaya, Parameswara, se réfugie sur l’île de Temasek (l’actuelle Singapour) mais s’établit finalement sur la côte ouest de la péninsule malaise vers 1400 et fonde la ville de Malacca, qui deviendra le plus grand port d’Asie du Sud-est, à la fois successeur de Sriwijaya et précurseur de Singapour.

Suite au déclin de Sriwijaya, c’est le Royaume de Majapahit (1292-1527), fondé à la fin du XIIIe siècle sur l’île de Java, qui dominera la plus grande partie de l’Indonésie actuelle.

C’est l’époque où les marins arabes commencent à s’installer dans la région.

Le royaume de Majapahit noua des relations avec celui le Royaume de Champa (192-1145 ; 1147-1190 ; 1220-1832) (Sud Vietnam), du Cambodge, du Siam (la Thaïlande) et du Myanmar méridional.

Le royaume de Majapahit envoyait également des missions en Chine. Alors que ses dirigeants étendirent leur pouvoir sur d’autres îles et mirent à sac les royaumes voisins, il chercha avant tout à augmenter sa part et son contrôle sur le commerce des marchandises transitant par l’archipel.

L’île de Singapour et la partie la plus au sud de la péninsule malaise fut un carrefour clé de l’ancienne Route de la soie maritime. Des fouilles archéologiques entrepris dans l’estuaire du Kallang et le long du fleuve Singapour, ont permis de découvrir des milliers d’éclats de verre, des perles naturelles ou en or, des céramiques et des pièces de monnaie chinoises de la période des Song du nord (960-1127).

La montée de l’Empire mongol au milieu du XIIIe siècle va provoquer l’accroissement du commerce par la mer et contribuer à la vitalité de la Route de la soie maritime. Marco Polo, après un voyage terrestre qui dura 17 ans, vers la Chine reviendra par bateau. Après avoir été témoin d’un naufrage, il passa de la Chine à Sumatra en Indonésie avant de remettre pied à terre à Ormuz en Perse (Iran).

Sous les dynasties Yuan et Ming

Sous la dynastie des Song, on exporte, vers le Japon, une quantité importante d’articles de soie. Sous celle des Yuan (1271-1368), le gouvernement instaure le Shi Bo Si, bureau en charge des échanges commerciaux, dans de nombreux ports comme, notamment, Ningbo, Canton, Shanghai, Ganpu, Wenzhou et Hangzhou, permettant, ainsi, l’exportation des soieries vers le Japon.

Durant les dynasties des Tang, Song et Yuan, et au début de celle des Ming, on assiste, dans chaque port, à la création d’un département océanique de négoce pour gérer l’ensemble des échanges commerciales extérieures maritimes.

Le commerce avec les sud de l’Inde et du golfe Persique fleurit. Le commerce avec l’Afrique de l’Est se développe également en fonction de la mousson et apporte de l’ivoire, de l’or et des esclaves. En Inde, des guildes commencent à contrôler le commerce chinois sur la côte du Malabar et au Sri Lanka. Les relations commerciales se formalisent tout en restant soumises à une forte concurrence. Cochin et Kozhikode (Calicut), deux grandes villes de l’Etat indien du Kerala, rivalisent alors pour dominer ce commerce.

Les explorations maritimes de l’amiral Zheng He

Carte des expéditions maritimes de l’amiral Zheng He.

Les explorations maritimes chinoises connaitront leur apogée au début du XVe siècle sous la dynastie Ming (1368-1644) qui, pour diriger sept expéditions diplomatiques navales, choisira un eunuque musulman de la cour, l’amiral Zheng He.

Financées par l’Empereur Ming Yongle, ces missions pacifiques en Asie du Sud-est, en Afrique de l’Est, dans l’Océan indien, dans le golfe Persique et en Mer Rouge, viseront avant tout à démontrer le prestige et la grandeur de la Chine et de son Empereur. Il s’agit également de reconnaître une trentaine d’Etats et de nouer des relations politiques et commerciales avec eux.

En 1409, avant une des expéditions, l’amiral chinois Zheng He demanda à des artisans de fabriquer une stèle en pierre taillée à Nanjing, actuelle capitale de la province du Jiangsu (est de la Chine). La stèle voyagea avec la flottille et fut laissée au Sri Lanka comme cadeau à un temple bouddhiste local. Des prières aux divinités en trois langues -chinois, persan et tamoul- furent gravés sur la stèle. Elle fut retrouvé en 1911 dans la ville de Galle, dans le sud-ouest du Sri Lanka et une réplique se trouve aujourd’hui en Chine.

L’armada de Zheng était composée de vraquiers armés, le plus modeste étant plus grand que les caravelles de Christophe Colomb. Les plus vastes atteignaient une longueur de 100 et une largeur de 50 mètres. D’après les chroniques Ming de l’époque, une expédition pouvait comprendre 62 navires avec 500 personnes à bord chacun. Certains d’entre eux transportaient la cavalerie militaire et d’autres des réservoirs d’eau potable. La construction navale chinoise était en avance. La technique de cloisons hermétiques, imitant la structure interne du bambou, offrait une sécurité incomparable. Elle fut la norme pour la flotte chinoise avant d’être copiée par les Européens 250 ans plus tard. A cela s’ajoutait l’emploi de la boussole et celui de cartes célestes peintes sur soie.

La synergie qui a pu exister entre marins arabes, indiens et chinois, tous des hommes de mer qui fraternisent face à l’adversité de l’océan, a de quoi nous impressionner. Par exemple, certains historiens estiment qu’il n’est pas exclu que le nom « Sindbad le marin », qui apparaît dans la fable d’origine perse qui conte les aventures d’un marin du temps de la dynastie des Abbassides (VIIIe siècle) et fut intégrée dans les Contes des Mille et Une Nuits, dérive du mot Sanbao, le surnom honorifique donné par l’Empereur chinois à l’amiral Zheng He, signifiant littéralement « Les trois joyaux », c’est-à-dire les trois vertus capitales indissociables communes aux principales philosophies que sont l’Eveil (qui permet d’apprendre), l’Altruisme (qui permet la compréhension de l’autre) et l’Equité (qui invite à partager avec lui).

Statue de l’amiral Zheng Ho devant une mosquée construite en son honneur en Indonésie.

Aussi bien en Chine (à Hong-Kong, à Macao, à Fuzhou, à Tianjin et à Nanjing) qu’à Singapour, en Malaisie et en Indonésie, des musées maritimes mettent les expéditions de l’amiral Zheng en valeur.

Soulignons cependant qu’au moins douze autres amiraux ont effectué des expéditions similaires en Asie du Sud-est et dans l’océan Indien. En 1403, l’amiral Ma Pi a conduit une expédition jusqu’en Indonésie et en Inde. Wu Bin, Zhang Koqing et Hou Xian en ont fait d’autres. Après que la foudre avait provoqué un incendie de la Cité interdite, une dispute éclata entre la classe des eunuques, partisans des expéditions, et des mandarins lettrés, qui obtiendront l’arrêt d’expéditions jugées trop onéreuses. Le dernier voyage a eu lieu entre 1430 et 1433, c’est-à-dire 64 ans avant que l’explorateur portugais Vasco da Gama ne se rende sur les mêmes lieux en 1497.

Le Japon, de son coté, de façon similaire, a restreint ses contacts avec le monde extérieure lors de la période Tokugawa (1600-1868) bien que son commerce avec la Chine ne fut jamais suspendu. Ce n’est qu’après la restauration Meiji en 1868 qu’un Japon ouvert au monde a ré-émergé.

Dans un repli sur eux-mêmes, le commerce aussi bien la Chine que du Japon tomba aux mains de comptoirs maritimes comme Malacca en Malaisie ou Hi An au Vietnam, deux villes aujourd’hui reconnues par l’Unesco comme patrimoine de l’humanité. H ?i An était un port étape majeur sur la route maritime reliant l’Europe et le Japon en passant par l’Inde et la Chine. Dans les épaves de navires retrouvées à Hi An, les chercheurs ont retrouvé des céramiques qui attendaient leur départ pour le Sinaï en Egypte.

Histoire des ports chinois

Au fil des années, on assiste à une évolution en ce qui concerne les principaux ports de la Route maritime de la Soie. A partir des années 330, Canton et Hepu étaient les deux ports les plus importants.

Cependant, Quanzhou se substitue à Canton, de la fin de la dynastie des Song à celle des Yuan.

A cette époque, Quanzhou, dans la province du Fujian et Alexandrie en Egypte étaient considérés comme les plus vastes ports du monde. A cause de la politique de fermeture sur le monde extérieur imposée à partir de 1435 et de l’influence des guerres, Quanzhou a été, progressivement, remplacé par les ports de Yuegang, Zhangzhou et Fujian.

Dès le début du IVe siècle, Canton est un important port de la Route maritime de la Soie. Peu à peu, il devient le plus vaste mais, également, le port d’Orient le plus renommé à travers le monde sous les dynasties des Tang et des Song. Durant cette période, la route maritime reliant Canton au golfe persique en passant par la Mer de Chine méridionale et l’océan Indien est la plus longue du monde.

Bien que plus tard supplanté par Quanzhou sous la dynastie des Yuan, le port de Canton demeurera le second plus grand port commercial de Chine. Par comparaison avec les autres, on le considère comme étant un port durablement prospère au cours des 2000 ans d’histoire de la Route maritime de la Soie.

Le système tributaire

La dernière dynastie impériale chinoise, celle des Qing, a régné de 1644 à 1912. Depuis l’arrivée de la dynastie Ming, les échanges commerciaux maritimes avec la Chine s’organisaient de deux façons :

Né sous les Ming en 1368, et le « système tributaire » atteindra son apogée sous les Qing. Il prend alors la forme raffinée d’une hiérarchie inclusive mutuellement bénéfique. Les Etats qui y adhèrent faisaient preuve de respect et de reconnaissance en présentant régulièrement à l’Empereur un tribut composé de produits locaux et en exécutant certaines cérémonies rituelles, notamment le « kowtow » (trois génuflexions et neuf prosternations). Ils demandaient également l’investiture de leurs dirigeants par l’Empereur et adoptaient le calendrier chinois. Outre la Chine, on y retrouvait le Japon, la Corée, le Vietnam, la Thaïlande, l’Indonésie, les îles Ryükyü, le Laos, le Myanmar et la Malaisie.

Paradoxalement tout en occupant un statut culturel central, le système tributaire offrait à ses vassaux un statut d’entité souveraine et leur permettait d’exercer leur autorité sur une aire géographique donnée. L’Empereur gagnait leur soumission en se préoccupant vertueusement de leur bien-être et en promouvant une doctrine de non-intervention et de non-exploitation. En effet, d’après les historiens, en termes financiers, la Chine ne s’est jamais enrichie d’une façon directe avec le système tributaire. En général, tous les frais de voyage et de séjour des missions tributaires étaient couverts par le gouvernement chinois. En plus des coûts de fonctionnement du système, les cadeaux offerts par l’Empereur avaient en général beaucoup plus de valeur que les tributs qu’il recevait. Chaque mission tributaire avait en effet le droit d’être accompagnée par un grand nombre de commerçants et une fois le tribut présenté à l’Empereur, le commerce pouvait commencer.

Il est à noter que, lorsqu’un pays perdait son statut d’Etat tributaire suite à un désaccord, ce dernier essayait à tout prix et parfois de façon violente d’être à nouveau autorisé à payer le tribut.

Le système de Canton

Port de Canton en 1850 avec les missions commerciales américaines, françaises et britanniques.

Le deuxième système concernait les puissances étrangères, principalement européennes, désireuses de faire du commerce avec la Chine. Il passait par le port de Guangzhou (à l’époque appelé Canton), le seul port accessibles aux Occidentaux.

Ainsi, les marchands, notamment ceux de la Compagnie britanniques des Indes orientales, pouvaient accoster, non pas dans le port mais devant la côte de Canton, d’octobre à mars, lors de la saison commerciale. C’est à Macao, à l’époque une possession Portugaise, que les Chinois leur fournissait le cas échéant une permission à cet effet. Les représentants de l’Empereur autorisaient alors des marchands chinois (les hongs) de commercer avec des navires étrangers tout en les chargeant de collecter les droits de douane avant qu’ils ne repartent.

Cette façon de commercer s’est amplifiée à la fin du XVIIIe siècle, notamment avec la forte demande anglaise de thé. C’est d’ailleurs du thé chinois de Fujian que les « insurgés » américains ont jeté à la mer lors de la fameuse « Boston Tea Party » de décembre 1773, un des premiers événements contre l’Empire britannique qui déclenchera la Révolution américaine. Des produits en provenance de l’Inde, en particulier le coton et l’opium furent échangés par la Compagnie des Indes orientales contre du thé, de la porcelaine et de la soie.

Les droits de douane collectés par le système de Canton étaient une source majeure de revenus pour la dynastie des Qing bien qu’elle bannira l’achat d’opium en provenance de l’Inde. Cette restriction imposée par l’Empereur chinois en 1796 conduira au déclenchement des guerres de l’Opium, la première dès 1839. En même temps, des rebellions éclatèrent dans les années 1850-60 contre le règne affaibli des Qing, doublées de guerres supplémentaires contre des puissances européennes hostiles.

Sac du Palais d’été par les Britanniques et les Français en 1860.

En 1860, l’ancien Palais d’été (parc Yuanming), avec un ensemble de pavillons, de temples, de pagodes et de librairies, c’est-à-dire la résidence des empereurs de la dynastie Qing à 15 kilomètres au nord-ouest de la Cité interdite de Pékin, fut ravagée par les troupes britanniques et françaises lors de la Seconde guerre de l’opium. Cette agression reste dans l’histoire comme l’un des pires actes de vandalisme culturel du XIXe siècle. Le Palais fut mis à sac une deuxième fois en 1900 par une alliance de huit pays contre la Chine.

Aujourd’hui, on peut y admirer une statue de Victor Hugo et un texte qu’il avait écrit pour s’élever contre Napoléon III et les destructions de l’impérialisme français, pour rappeler que cela était non pas le fait d’une nation, mais celui d’un gouvernement.

A la fin de la première guerre mondiale, la Chine disposait de 48 ports ouverts où les étrangers pouvaient commercer en suivant leurs propres juridictions. Le XXe siècle fut une ère de révolutions et de changements sociaux. La fondation de la République populaire de Chine en 1949 engendra un repli sur soi.

Ce n’est qu’en 1978 que Deng Xiaoping annonça une politique d’ouverture sur le monde extérieur en vue de la modernisation du pays.

Initiative chinoise des Nouvelles Routes de la soie terrestres et maritimes.

Au XXIe siècle, grâce à l’Initiative une ceinture (économique) une route (maritime) lancée par le Président Xi Jingping, la Chine ré-émerge comme une grande puissance mondiale offrant des coopérations mutuellement bénéfiques au service d’un meilleur avenir partagé pour l’humanité.

Merci de partager !
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •