Étiquette : Leonardo

 

On Leonardo da Vinci’s « Vitruvian Man »

By Karel Vereycken

Leonardo da Vinci’s « Viruvian Man ». Since we’re commemorating this year (2020) Leonardo Da Vinci, who died 500 years ago, many silly things are presented by fake scholars trying to make a real living.

Since I was introduced into the canon of proportions of the human body during my training as a professional painter and engraver, I want offer you some hints on how to look at what is called Da Vinci’s « Vitruvian man », a drawing currently on exhibit at the Da Vinci show at the Louvre in Paris.

Hence, as Leonardo underlines himself in his notebooks, adopting Cusanus wordings, it is only with the « eyes of the mind » that art becomes visible, because the « eyes of the flesh » are intrensically blind to it.

Canons of proportions

Europe, and Classical Greece, as everybody should know, emerged largely by absorbing several major discoveries accomplished much earlier by other civilizations. Much of it came from Asia, but African and especially Egypt, were key.

The very practice of mummification, a process which takes at least 60 days of work, made Egypt the key area of anatomical research.

Left an egyptian stutue. Right a Greek archaic Kuros.

As demonstrated by early Egyptian sculpture, the exact size of the entire adult human body is 7,5 times the size of the head. The size of a newborn is only four heads, that of a seven year old, six heads and that of a 17 years old adolescent, 7 heads.

Drawing class card of the author.

If one subdivides the overall 7.5 proportion, for an adult, from the top of the head till the lowest part of the torso, one measures four heads, one till the nipples, one till the belly button and a fourth one till the lowest part of the pubis. Going up from the sole till the middle of the pelvis, one measures 3.5 heads: 2 heads till the knee and 1.5 till the middle of the pelvis. That brings the total till 7.5 heads for the entire length of the adult human body and it is proportional in the sense that people with smaller heads also have small bodies.

Polikleitos versus Lysippus

In the Vth Century BC, the Greek sculptor Polikleitos’ spear bearer (The “Doryphoros”) of Naples National Archeological Museum applied this most beautiful canon of proportions, known as the “Polikleitos canon”.

During the Renaissance, the nostalgics of the Roman Empire preferred another Greek canon, that of Greek sculptor Lysippus (4th Century BC), formalized by the Roman author, architect and civil engineer, Vitrivius (1st century BC).

Vitruvius only transcribed the prevalent taste of his epoch. Roman sculptors, in order to give an athletic and heroic look to the Emperors which they were portraying, adopting the canon of Lysippus, could reduce the head of their models to only an eight of the total length of the body. The trick was that by reducing the relative size of the head, the body looked more preeminent and powerful, something most emperors, who were often physical failures, appreciated and secured their popularity. Even extreme cases of 12 to 15 heads of body length appeared. In short, Public relations ruled at the detriment of science and truth.

Today’s comic strip drawers chose proportions according to purpose:

–For real life, 7.5 or “normal canon”
–For a movie star, 8 heads, with the “idealistic canon”;
–For a fashion magazine: 8.5 heads;
–For a comic book hero: 9 heads for the “heroic canon”

Vitruvian man

« Vitruvian man », drawing of Leonard da Vinci.

Text accompanying Leonardo DaVinci’s Vitruvian Man:

Vitruvius, the architect, says in his work on architecture that the measurements of the human body are distributed by Nature as follows that is that 4 fingers make 1 palm, and 4 palms make 1 foot, 6 palms make 1 cubit; 4 cubits make a man’s height. And 4 cubits make one pace and 24 palms make a man; and these measures he used in his buildings. If you open your legs so much as to decrease your height 1/14 and spread and raise your arms till your middle fingers touch the level of the top of your head you must know that the centre of the outspread limbs will be in the navel and the space between the legs will be an equilateral triangle.

The length of a man’s outspread arms is equal to his height.

From the roots of the hair to the bottom of the chin is the tenth of a man’s height; from the bottom of the chin to the top of his head is one eighth of his height; from the top of the breast to the top of his head will be one sixth of a man. From the top of the breast to the roots of the hair will be the seventh part of the whole man. From the nipples to the top of the head will be the fourth part of a man. The greatest width of the shoulders contains in itself the fourth part of the man. From the elbow to the tip of the hand will be the fifth part of a man; and from the elbow to the angle of the armpit will be the eighth part of the man. The whole hand will be the tenth part of the man; the beginning of the genitals marks the middle of the man. The foot is the seventh part of the man. From the sole of the foot to below the knee will be the fourth part of the man. From below the knee to the beginning of the genitals will be the fourth part of the man. The distance from the bottom of the chin to the nose and from the roots of the hair to the eyebrows is, in each case the same, and like the ear, a third of the face.

Of course, Da Vinci’s exploration of the Vitruvian man doesn’t mean he approves or disapproves the stated fakery in proportions.

Soul or muscle?

It should be known that in Italy, the pure Roman taste has become trendy again following the discovery in 1506 of the statue of the Laocoon on the site of Nero’s villa in Rome. From that moment, artist will feel obliged to increase the volume of the muscular masses in order to appear as working « in Antique style ».

Although Leonardo never openly criticized this trend, it is hard not to think of Michelangelo’s frescoes in the Sistine Chapel, when the artist, seeking to raise the spirit to unequalled philosophical heights, advised painters: « do not give all the muscles of the figures an exaggerated volume » and « if you act differently, it is more a sort of representation of a sack of nuts that you will have achieved than to that of a human figure » (Codex Madrid II, 128r).

Drawing by the architect Giacomo Andrea, a close friend of Leonardo da Vinci, who had studied the work of the Roman architect and engineer Vitruvius.

No doubt inspired by his friend, the architect Giacomo Andrea, in « The Vitruvian Man », Leonardo is above all interested by other harmonies: if a person extends his arms in a direction parallel to the ground, one obtains the same length as one’s entire height. This equality is inscribed by Leonardo in a square (symbol of the earthly realm). But if one stretches his arms and legs in a star shape, they are inscribed in a circle whose center is the navel. The location of the navel divides the body according to the golden ratio (in this example 5 heads out of a total of 8 heads, 5+3 being part of the Fibonnacci series: 1+2 = 3; 3+2 = 5; 5+3 = 8; 8+5 = 13; 13+8 = 21, etc.).

Leonardo clearly understood what the golden section really means: not a “magical” number in itself, but the reflexion of the dynamic of least action, the very principle uniting man (the square) with the creator and the universe (the circle).

So if you take a look, beware of what you see and especially what you don’t !

Merci de partager !
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

La Vierge aux rochers, « l’erreur fantastique » de Léonard

La Vierge aux Rochers (1483-1486), Léonard de Vinci, Louvre, Paris.
 

Par Karel Vereycken

En 1992, j’ai réalisé une copie à taille réelle de la Vierge aux rochers, un des chefs-d’œuvre de Léonard de Vinci appartenant à la collection du Louvre.

La commanditaire, une enseignante habitant l’Est de la France, y tenait à titre pédagogique. Or, la ville où elle exerçait sa profession, n’avait pas de musée. Pour combler ce manque, elle installa plusieurs copies de maîtres anciens à son domicile.

C’est là qu’elle permettait à de nombreux enfants de vivre un de ces moments magiques qui font de notre existence un délice. Car dialoguer, lors d’un rendez-vous, avec un tableau d’une beauté extrême de Léonard, fait de nous des humains.

copie vierge aux rochers
Copie réalisée en 1992 par Karel Vereycken de la Vierge aux Rochers de Léonard de Vinci actuellement à l’Église Saint-Laurent (Paris, XIe arr.)

Pour des raisons divers, ma copie à fini à l’Eglise Saint-Laurent de Paris, proche de la gare de l’Est, où on peut l’admirer et où il garde à ce jour une bonne place pour tout ceux qui désirent prier et méditer.

En 1992, en m’attelant à copier avec précision cette œuvre, j’ai constaté une chose étrange qui n’a cessé de me troubler. En plus, les plus grand spécialistes de Léonard dont j’ai consulté les écrits (Martin Kemp, Carlo Pedretti ou encore Daniel Arasse), semblent tous avoir passé à coté d’une énorme « erreur » anatomique présent dans ce tableau. Certes, il est vrai qu’ils n’ont jamais copié des œuvres de ce type. Et évidemment, une fois identifiée, cette erreur ne quitte plus votre champs de vision ni votre esprit.

Les faits sont incontestables. Il s’agit d’une erreur anatomique majeure touchant l’ange situé à droite du tableau. Avant de préciser cette erreur, quelques mots sur l’œuvre comme un tout où cet ange joue un rôle majeur.

Le sens de l’œuvre

Le sujet de la Vierge aux rochers n’illustre aucun évènement spécifique des Évangiles et reste donc ouvert à toute interprétation. Il pourrait s’agir d’un évènement popularisé par le théologien du XIVe siècle Pietro Cavalca, quand saint Jean et le Christ enfant se sont retrouvés lors de la fuite de la sainte famille en Égypte.

L’ange serait alors l’archange Uriel qui, selon l’interprétation de Cavalca, protégeait l’enfant-ermite saint Jean. Or, Uriel, en hébreu lumière de Dieu, est l’ange qui apporte à l’humanité la connaissance et la compréhension du Divin.

Bas-relief du maître de Léonard, Andrea del Verrocchio

Seule figure à nous regarder de face, c’est par lui que nous « entrons » dans le tableau. C’est lui qui pointe son doigt sur un des enfants, plus précisément Saint-Jean Baptise agenouillé en prière devant l’enfant Jésus qui à son tour le bénit. La Vierge, au centre, a sa main droite posée sur l’épaule de Saint-Jean Baptiste qui lui semble sur le bord d’un relief. Elle le protège et le retient. Entretemps, elle garde sa main protectrice au-dessus de l’enfant Jésus qui lui, également au bord d’un précipice, est protégé à son tour par la main de l’ange qui nous regarde. L’ange nous met donc sur la « bonne piste » pour comprendre le sens que Léonard a voulu faire ressortir de l’œuvre qui s’éloigne un peu de celui de l’immaculé conception, souhaité par ses commanditaires.

Platon ?

Il pourrait également s’agir d’une interprétation philosophique personnelle de Léonard de Vinci. Dans l’iconographie médiévale et pré-renaissante, l’ange de l’annonciation se rend auprès de Marie pour lui signifier que son heure est venue. Or, ici, l’ange se retourne vers nous tout en indiquant qu’il découvre sur place un autre annonciateur : saint Jean Baptiste.

Ce dernier, saint patron de la ville de Florence, fut parfois associé à Platon. Les grands humanistes de l’époque, en effet, considérait que la philosophie de Platon, bien qu’avec des limites et des imperfections, préfigurait le message de l’Évangile. Pour eux, les « petites lumières » de l’Antiquité (païenne) annonçaient timidement la grande lumière de la Chrétienté. Or, saint Jean Baptiste, qui avait vécu comme Platon avant le Christ, avait lui aussi annoncé sa venue. Par analogie, l’image de saint Jean Baptiste, pourrait être une métaphore du platonisme christianisé qui fut la puissance fondatrice de toute la Renaissance européenne.

A un moment où le Vatican, avec saint Thomas d’Aquin, avait fait le choix calamiteux de privilégier Aristote dont la philosophie est diamétralement contraire avec l’Évangile, le tableau de Léonard n’a pu qu’apparaître comme une terrible provocation. Le Vatican semble d’ailleurs ne lui avoir jamais pardonné car contrairement à Raphaël ou Michel-Ange, des propagandistes égotiques dont le contenu philosophique était largement inférieur à celui exprimé par Léonard, le Vatican n’a jamais honoré De Vinci de la moindre commande, une des raisons pour son départ pour la France.

La Vierge aux rochers (Léonard de Vinci, Louvre, Paris.) Détail de l’ange.
 

L’erreur

Lorsque l’on scrute avec attention, comme j’ai dû le faire pour réaliser ma copie conforme, la position anatomique de l’ange en bas à droite, l’on constate la chose suivante :

–Contrairement à l’impression initiale, l’ange n’est pas assis sur son fessier ;

–L’ange est agenouillé sur son genou gauche qu’on identifie sous le vêtement rouge ;

–Son genou droit est donc en hauteur derrière le corps de l’ange ;

–Par contre, son pied droit est posé au sol sur la végétation. Il est visible et on peut compter les orteils ;

–Par conséquent, avec son corps, et donc sa colonne vertébrale, dans cette position, le positionnement de la tête de l’ange, telle qu’elle est peinte, est strictement impossible. Pour un être « normal », cette tête doit s’inscrire dans la prolongation de la courbe que forme la colonne vertébrale, c’est-à-dire fortement s’incliner vers la gauche.

Comment l’expliquer ?

J’appelle cette erreur « fantastique » non pas parce qu’elle est digne d’un élève, une autre hypothèse plausible, mais parce qu’elle nous apprend quelque chose sur nous mêmes.

La Vierge aux rochers de Léonard de Vinci. A gauche, l’original du Louvre. A droite, la copie au National Gallery de Londres. Notez que dans cette dernière, le doigt de l’ange a disparu…

Deux pistent offrent des hypothèses pourquoi tant de gens « n’ont rien vu » :

1)      D’abord personne n’en a parlé et des milliers de copies ont déjà été réalisées. Notez que la plus connue, réalisée à l’époque et actuellement dans la collection du National Gallery de Londres, bien qu’elle a changé le sens de l’œuvre en amputant la main de l’ange, tente discrètement d’estomper l’erreur dont nous parlons ;

2)      L’amour rend aveugle. Nous sommes « bon public » et donc nous nous imposons une forme de cécité. Tout d’abord, puisqu’il s’agit de Léonard de Vinci, un des plus grands génies de tous les temps, surtout en anatomie ! Ensuite, la « gestalt » du tableau comme un tout est d’une telle puissance et d’une telle beauté, que nous « pardonnons » immédiatement toute erreur de ce type. Un peu comme lorsqu’un bon pianiste nous joue une sonate magnifique de Beethoven. Tant que l’interprète nous traduit avec fidélité l’intention sublime du compositeur, nous « n’entendons » pas telle ou telle fausse note. Et c’est pareil en peinture.

Merci de partager !
  •  
  • 8
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
    8
    Partages