Étiquette : Shakespeare

 

Rembrandt and the Light of Agapè

Rembrandt Harmenszoon van Rijn. Don’t count on me here to tell his story in a few lines! (*1) In any case, since the romantics, all, and nearly to much has been said and written about the rediscovered Dutch master of light inelegantly thrown into darkness by the barbarians of neo-classicism.

By Karel Vereycken, June 2001.

The uneasy task that imparts me here is like that of Apelles of Cos, the Greek painter who, when challenged, painted a line evermore thinner than the abysmal line painted by his rival. In order to draw that line, tracing the horizons of the political and philosophical battles who raged that epoch will unveil new and surprising angles throwing unusual light on the genius of our painter-philosopher.

First, we will show that Rembrandt (1606-1669) was « the painter of the Thirty years War » (1618-1648), a terrible continental conflict unfolding during a major part of his life, challenging his philosophical, religious and political commitment in favor of peace and unity of mankind.

Secondly, we will inquire into the origin of that commitment and worldview. Did Rembrandt met the person and ideas of the Czech humanist Jan Amos Komensky (« Comenius ») (1592-1670), one of the organizers of the revolt of Bohemia? This militant for peace, predecessor of Leibniz in the domain of pansophia (universal wisdom), traveled regularly to the Netherlands where he settled definitively in 1656. A strong communion of ideas seems to unite the painter with the great Moravian pedagogue.

Also, isn’t it astonishing that the treaties of Westphalia, who put an end to the atrocious war, are precisely based on the notions of repentance and pardon so dear to Comenius and sublimely evoked in Rembrandt’s art?

Finally, we will dramatize the subject matter by sketching the stark contrast opposing Rembrandt’s oeuvre with that of one of the major war propagandist: (Sir) Peter Paul Rubens (1577-1640).

Rembrandt, who finished rejecting any quest for earthly glory could not but paint his work away from that of the fashion-styled Flemish courtier painter. Moreover, Rubens was in high gear mobilizing all his virtuoso energy in support of the oligarchy whose Counter Reformation crusades and Jesuitical fanaticism were engulfing the continent with gallows, fire and innocent blood.

What Rembrandt advises us for his painting also applies to his life: if you stick your head to close to the canvass, the toxic odors will sharply irritate your nose and eyes. But taking some distance will permit you to discover sublime and unforgettable beauty.

What Art?

Since the triumph of Immanuel Kant‘s modernist thesis, the Critique of the Faculty of Judgment, it has not been « politically correct » to assert that art has a political dimension. And with good reason! If art can influence the course of history and shape it through its power, it is because it is a vector of ideas! An impossibility, according to the Kantian thesis, because art is a gratuitous act, free of everything, including meaning. The ultimate freedom! You either like it or you don’t, it’s all a matter of taste.

Following in the footsteps of the German poet Friedrich Schiller, we’re here to convince you otherwise, and abolish the tyranny of taste. For us, art is an eminently political act, although the work of art has nothing in common with a mere political manifesto, and the artist can in no way be reduced to an ordinary « activist ».

His domain, that of the poet, the musician or the visual artist, is to be a guide for mankind. To enable people to identify within themselves what makes them human, i.e. to strengthen that part of their soul, of their divine creativity, which places them entirely at the zenith of their responsibility for the whole of creation.

To achieve this, and we’ll develop this here, what counts in art is the type of conception of love it communicates. By making this « universal » sensitive, sublime art makes the most elevated conception of love accessible.

Such art, which forces us think, employs enigmas, ambiguities, metaphores and ironies to give us access to the idea beyond the visible. For art that limits itself to theatricality and the beauty of form fatally sinks into erotic, romantic love, depriving man of his humanity and therefore of his revolutionary power.

Rubens will be the ambassador of the great un-powers of his time: the glory of the empire and the magnificent financial strength of those days « new economy », the « tulip bubble ». In short, the oligarchy.

Rembrandt, in turn, will be the ambassador of the have-nots: the weak, the sick, the humiliated, the refugees; he will live in the image of the living Christ as the ambassador of humanity. It might seem strange to you to call such a man the « the painter of the thirty years war. »

Paradoxically, his historical period underscores the fact that very often mankind only wakes up and mobilizes its best resources for genius when confronted with the terrible menace of extinction. Today, when the Cheney’s, the Rumsfeld’s and the Kissinger’s want to plunge the world into a « post-Westphalian epoch », in reality a new dark age of « perpetual war », Rembrandt will be one of our powerful weapons of mass education.

Historical context and the origins of the war

Before entering Rembrandt, it is indispensable to know what was at stake those days. The academic name « Thirty Years War » indicates only the last period of a far longer period of « religious » conflict which was taking place around the globe during the sixteenth century, mainly centered in central Europe, on the territory of today’s Germany.

While 1618 refers to the revolt of Bohemia, the 1648 peace of Westphalia defines a reality far beyond the apparent religious pretext: the utter ruin of the utopian imperial dream of Habsburg and the birth of modern Europe composed of nation-states (*2)

On the reasons for « religious » warfare, let us look at the first half of the sixteenth century. At the eighteen years long Council of Trent (1545-1563), the Roman Catholic Church discarded stubbornly all the wise advise given earlier to avoid all conflict by one of its most ardent, but most critical supporters: Erasmus of Rotterdam.

As Erasmus forewarned, by choosing as main adversary the radical anti-semite demagogue Martin Luther, the church degraded itself to sterile and intolerant dogmatism, opening each day new highways for « the Reformation ».

The religious power-sharing of the « Peace of Augsburg » of 1555, between Rome and the protestant princes, temporarily calmed down the situation, but the ambiguous terms of that treaty incorporated all the germs of the new conflicts to come. Note that « freedom of religion » meant above all « freedom of possession ». The « peace » solely applied to Catholics and Lutherans, authorizing both to possess churches and territories, while ostracizing all the others, very often abusively labeled « Calvinists ».

Playing diabolically on internal divisions, some evil Jesuits of those days set up Calvinists and Lutherans to combat each other bitterly, by claiming, for example in Germany, that Calvinism was illegal since not explicitly mentioned in the treaty. Furthermore, the citizen obtained no real freedom of religion; he was simply authorized to leave the country or adopt the confessions of his respective lord or prince, which in turn could freely choose.

As a result of a general climate of suspicion, the protestant princes created in 1608 the « Evangelical Union » under the direction of the palatine elector Frederic V. Their eyes and hopes were turned on King Henri IV‘s France, where the Edit of Nantes and other treaties had ended a far long era of religious wars. After Henry IV‘s assassination in 1610, the Evangelical Union forged an alliance with Sweden and England.

The answer of the Catholic side, was the formation in 1609 of a « Holy League » allied with Habsburg’s Spain by Maximilian of Bavaria. Beyond all the religious and political labels, a real war party is created on both sides and the heavy clouds carrying the coming tempest threw their menacing shadows on a sharply divided Europe.

1618: The Revolt of Bohemia

Prague defenstration.

Hence, after the never-ending revolt of the Netherlands, the very idea of an insurrection of Bohemia drove the Habsburgs (and the slave trading Fugger and Welser banking empires controlling them) into total hysteria, since they felt the heath on their plans. If Bohemia would become « a new, but larger Holland », then many other nations, such as Poland, could join the Reformation camp and destabilize the imperial geopolitical power balance forever.

As from 1576, the crown of Bohemia was in the hands of the Catholic Rudolphe II, Holy Roman Emperor. Despite a far-fetched passion for esotericism, Rudolphe II will be the protector of astronomers Tycho Brahe and Johannes Kepler in Prague.

In 1609, the Protestants of Bohemia obtain from him a « Letter of Majesty » offering them certain rights in terms of religion. After his death in 1612, his brother Matthias, Holy Roman Emperor, became his successor and left the direction of the country to cardinal Melchior Klesl, a radical Counter Reformation militant refusing any application of the « letter of majesty ».

This set the conditions for the famous « defenestration of Prague », when two representatives of the imperial power were thrown out of the window and fall on a manure heap, at the end of hot diplomatic negotiations. That highly symbolical act was in reality the first signal for a general uprising, and following the early death of Matthias, the rebels made Frederic V their sovereign instead of accepting Habsburg’s choice.

Charles Zerotina, a protestant nobleman and Comenius, (see box below), a Moravian reverend and respected community leader, masterminded that revolt. Frederic V, for example was crowned in 1619 by Jan Cyrill, who was Zerotina’s confessor, and whose daughter will become Comenius wife.

The insurgents were defeated at the battle of White Mountain, close to Prague, in 1620 by a Catholic coalition, composed of Spanish troops pulled out of Flanders together with Maximilian’s Bavarians. On the scene: French philosopher René Descartes, who paid his own trip and who was part of the war coalition and joined in entering defeated Prague in search for Kepler’s astronomical instruments… (*3)

An arrest warrant immediately targeted Comenius, who escaped with Zerotina from bloody repression. Protestantism was forbidden and the Czech language replaced by German.

Most resistance leaders were arrested and 27 beheaded in public. Their heads were put up on pins and shown on the roof of Prague’s Saint-Charles bridge.

One of them was the famous Jan Jessenius, head of the University of Prague who performed one of Europe’s early public anatomical dissections in 1600 and was a close friend of Tycho Brahe. To warn those who used their speech to encourage « heresy », his tongue was pulled out before he was beheaded, quartered and impaled.

Thirty thousand people went into exile while Frederic V and his court took refuge in Den Haag in the Netherlands. There, but years before, Comenius had a personal encouter with the future « Winterkönig » and his wife Elisabeth Stuart, on their way back from their wedding in England for which Shakespeare had arranged a representation of « The Tempest ».

A World War

Misery and calamities of war, Jacques Callot.

1618 marked the outbreak of an all-out war across Europe, provoked by the imperial drive of Habsburg to reunify all of the continent behind one unique emperor and one single religion.

As of 1625, aided by French and English financial facilities, Christian IV of Denmark and Gustave Adolphus of Sweden intervened on the northern flank against Habsburg descending from the north as far as up till Munich.

Then, France opened another flank on the western front in 1635. Catholic cardinal Richelieu, who defeated the Huguenots at LaRochelle in 1628 (since he « fought their political rights but not their religious ones », will heavily aid the Protestant camp. His fears were that,

« if the protestant party is completely in shambles, the offensive of the house of Austria will come down on France ».

The famous etchings of the Lorraine engraver Jacques Callot, « Misery and calamities of war » of 1633, give an idea how this savage war swept Europe with its cortège of misery, famine, epidemics and desolation.

The estimated population loss on the territory of present day Germany indicates a downturn from 15 to less than 10 million. Hundreds of cities were turned back into simple villages and thousands of communities simply disappeared from the map.

War affected all the colonies of those powers involved in the conflict. Dutch and English pirates would sink any Spanish or Portuguese ships encountered at the other edge of the Earth’s curve. For Spain, loyal pillar of Habsburg, 250 million ducats were spent for the war effort (between 1568 and 1654), despite the state bankruptcy of 1575. That amount represents more than the double of the revenue from the loot of the new world (gold, spices, slaves, etc.) which scarcely amounted only to 121 million ducats…

Rembrandt and Comenius

That the young Rembrandt was totally heckled by the situation of general war which was shaking up Europe is easily visible in the early self-portrait of Nuremberg.

Here he portrays himself divided between two choices. One shoulder reveals the gorget, a piece of armor that invokes the patriotic call for serving the nation calling on every young Dutchman of his generation in age of serving the military, especially after the surprise attack of the Spanish troops on Amersfoort of august 1629.

The other shoulder is nonchalantly caressed by a « liefdelok », the French « cadenette » or lovelock exhibited by amorous adolescents. What to choose? Love the nation, or the beloved?

More and more irritated by the ambitions of Constantijn Huygens, the powerful secretary of the stadholder which got him well-paid orders for the government and made him move from Leiden to Amsterdam, Rembrandt’s thinking and activity gets ever more concentrated and powerful.

Ten years later, the dying away of his wife Saskia in 1642, year of the « Night watch », plunges the painter into a deep personnal existential crisis. Gone, the self-portraits where he paints himself as an Italian courtier, with a glove in one hand carrying a heavy golden chain around his neck fronting for his social status and competing with the court. Suddenly he seems to realize that the totality of the world’s gold will never buy back the lost lives of those once loved.

When interrogated on the matter, Rembrandt would bluntly state he didn’t need to go to Italy, as the tradition used to be, since everything Italy ever produced came to him anyway as it was available in one form or another on the Amsterdam art market. But traveler he was, as drawings of the gates of London indicate, done in the early forties, maybe the year Comenius crossed the channel?

In 1644, the neo-Platonist rabbi and teacher of Spinoza, Menasseh Ben Israel, for which Rembrandt illustrated books, received a letter from Comenius agent John Dury, chaplain of Mary Princess of Orange, starting a discussion on the reintegration of the Jews in England, and Menasseh finally went for negotiations to meet Cromwell in 1655.

The Nightly Conspiracy

« The nightly conspiracy of Claudius Civilus at the Schakerbos ».

Although some timid hypothesis’ exists concerning Comenius‘ influence on Rembrandt, a rigorous historian’s research could certainly bring more light on this matter.

Although Rembrandt’s worldview evolved in an environment of the Mennonite community, peace-loving Anabaptists miles away from any political commitment, Rembrandt’s passion for the « cause of Bohemia » seems particularly striking in « The nightly conspiracy of Claudius Civilus at the Schakerbos ».

The large painting figured as one in a series planned to decorate the new Amsterdam city hall to celebrate the revolt of the Batavians against the Romans. Starting from historical elements of Tacitus, the story had been cooked up to warm up Dutch patriotism since the reference to Spanish tyranny was clear to all. For reasons unknown today, Rembrandt’s painting was taken down after a couple of months. To mock the cowardice of the ruling elites, Rembrandt seems to have transposed the historical scene into his present timeframe.

One Swedish historian thinks that the leader of the conspiracy here is not Claudius Civilis (the Batavian general who lost an eye in battle), but another general who equally lost an eye in battle and which was non-other than the Hussite general Jan Zizka! (*4).

Remember that Comenius and the revolt of Bohemia strongly identified with John Huss. Looking closely makes you discover that Rembrandt’s Claudius Civilis is indeed dressed up in central European costume. From left to right one sees first a Dutch patrician. Is this a portrait of the then rising republican Jan De Wit?

Next, one sees a monk, without weapons, who poses his hand on Civilus’ arm in a conspiratorial gesture. Is this Comenius resistance movement, the Unity of the Brethren?

According to the historians, the two chalices, one wide, the other narrow, could signify the « Eucharist under the two species », namely that bread and wine be shared with all, which happened to be one of the demands of the Jan Hus tradition.

One also can identify a Jew or rabbi taking place in the conspiracy. Looks pretty weird for a simple Batavian conspiracy! That the establishment was unhappy to see their hero painted as an ugly Cyclops seems probable.

But to be challenged in their flight forward into pompous fantasy in stead of taking up the urgent tasks of their time was another one.

King of Swedish Steel, Louis De Geer

Louis de Geer.

Comenius arrives in Amsterdam on invitation of the de Geer family in 1656, the year of Rembrandt’s bankruptcy (*5).

Louis de Geer, alias « the Steel King » and his son Laurent were the life-long protectors of Comenius for whom they paid the funeral and even build a chapel in the city of Naarden, some miles outside Amsterdam.

Originally from Luik (Liège) in today’s Belgium, that uncompromising Calvinist family settled in Amsterdam. It was the de Geer family who led the foundations of Sweden’s industrial flowering of iron, steel and copper . To do this, de Geer brought three hundred families of Walloon steelworkers to Sweden, and for whom he build hospitals, schools, housing projects and commercial facilities.

De Geer also financed the scottish preacher John Dury and the « intelligencer » Samuel Hartlib, two active friends of Comenius in England. At war with the Royal Society and Francis Bacon, they wanted to render scientific knowledge available to all of the population.

John Milton’s treatise On Education was dedicated to the same Samuel Hartlib. Louis de Geer and Sweden’s prime Minister Johan Skytte, realized Comenius education projects were the best of all possible investment to foster the physical economy. His educational reforms created a labor force of such an exceptional quality and astonishing productivity, that they warmly invited him to Sweden and asked him to reform the nation’s educational system.

That relationship of Comenius with the de Geer family leads us to Rembrandt, since Louis de Geer’s sister, Marghareta, and her husband Jacob Trip, one of the major shareholders of the Swedish copper mines, had their portrait done by Rembrandt, offering him a well paid order during very difficult years.

Margaretha De Geer, painted by Rembrandt.

The City of Amsterdam allotted Comenius a yearly pension, encouraged him to publish his complete works on pedagogy and offered him the keys of the city library. Comenius brought over his family and assistants and installed a library and a printing shop behind the Westerkerk where Rembrandt will be buried.

Comenius, when going every day from his house to his printing shop crossed the street where Rembrandt lived his last days. Since early this century, Czech curators got convinced that Rembrandt’s Portrait of an old man at the Uffizi Gallery in Florence, is in reality a portrait of Comenius (*6).

True or not, one has to realize that Rembrandt demanded to each of his models to sit each day for four hours over a period of three months to paint their portrait, a thing maybe not so evident for the aging Comenius.

But what is known with certainty is the fact that one of Rembrandt’s pupils, Juriaen Ovens, painted Comenius portrait during that period.

The Peace of Westphalia and the « Via Lucis »

Signing of the Peace of Westphalia in Münster 1648.

Although Bohemia did not gain its long-desired independence at the peace of Westphalia, one cannot underestimate Comenius influence on the negotiations leading to the establishment of the peace-treaty. His work, Cesta Pokoje (Road to peace) of 1630, written in Czech is described as,

« an ethical-religious writing in which love, faith and mutual comprehension are established as the single ethical foundations of a possible peace ».

From 1641 to 1642, right before the start of the first peace negotiations, Comenius wrote the Via Lucis (The path of light), which could have been used as a guiding memorandum for the negotiators.

At the question if this Via Lucis was a millenarist mystical vision, as has been often pretended, we can consider the following.

Asked what could be hoped for and when a major change could take place, Comenius answered that the hope would come with the arrival of a time where the Gospel of the Kingdom would be preached all over the world and universal peace established.

That change could arise as the result of the emergence of a light to which will turn not only the Christian, but all the people of the world.

That light will come, « from the combination of the lanterns of human conscience, of a rational consideration of the works of God or of nature, and from the law or divine will ».

For him, « human enterprise can, through prayer and considerations of pious men imagine the possible ways to unite these rays of light, to irradiate them on the entirety of the human species and to spill similar thoughts in the minds of others » (*7).

Rembrandt’s etching that Goethe would (wrongly) use as the frontispiece for his Faust in 1790, since the light here is the divine light and not that of the devil.

One identifies exactly that concept in an etching of Rembrandt that Goethe awkwardly used by having it copied as frontispiece for his Faust in 1790 (*8).

The subject here is not at all a man going along to get along with the devil, but light (mirror of Christ) enlightening the life and the mind of the mortals. Way before Voltaire and opposed to the Venetian illuminati, Comenius and Rembrandt made own the metaphor of light.

To get an even more precise idea of Comenius demands for peace, one can read another memorandum called Angelus Pacis (The peace-angel),

« send to the English and Dutch peace Ambassadors at Breda, a writing designated to be sent afterwards to all the Christians of Europe and then to all the nations of the world in order to stop them, that they cease fighting each other ».

Comenius first remarks laconically that England and Holland are morally so degraded that they even don’t need some spiritual difference as a pretext, but fight each other for purely material possessions! As a way out, he proposes a new friendship:

« But how do you conceive that new friendship (or rather reestablishment of your friendship)? Will it be not by the general pardon that you will allow each other? The wise men have always seen the oblivion of received injuries as the surest road leading to peace. Touching too rudely the wounds, is to revivify the pains and to furnish the wounds an occasion for irritation.

« When this is true, it would be to be wished that the river Aa, whose tranquil waters irrigate Breda, would turn for this hour into the river Lethe of which the poets tell us that whoever drinks their water forgets everything of the past.

« The one who is guilty of trouble, God will find him, even when men, for love of peace, spare him. That the just one starts accusing himself; that means that the one whose conscience accuses him of having broken the friendship and witnessed enmity, should, according to justice, be the first one and the most ardent to reestablish friendship. If the offended party neglects that duty of justice, it will be the honor of the offended party to assume that honorable role, according to the word of the philosopher. » (*9)

COMENIUS: TEACH EVERYTHING TO ALL AND EVERYONE

Jan Amos Komensky (« Comenius ») (1592-1670) was above all a militant teacher, practicing « the universal art of teaching everything to everybody » (pan-sophia) and reckless source of inspiring enthusiasm.

One year after his death in 1670, Leibniz wrote of him: « time will come, Comenius, that honors will be offered to your works, to your hopes and even to the objects of your desires ».

In some domains, indeed, Comenius was Leibniz‘s precursor. First, he fought the fossilization of thought resulting from the dominant Aristotelianism: « Little time after that unification between Christ and Aristotle, the church fell into a pitiable state and became filled with the uproar of theological dispute ».

Strong defender of the free will that he didn’t see entirely in contradiction with an Augustinianconcept of predestination, he felt closer to John Huss than to Calvin, while generally labeled a « Calvinist » by historians.

In 1608, Comenius enters the Latin School of Prérov (Moravia), a school reorganized at the demand of Charles Zerotina on the model of the Calvinist school of Sankt-Gall in Switzerland. Zerotina was one of the key figures of the Bohemian nobility, promoter of the Church of Unity of Brethren, organizer of popular education and key leader of the international anti-Habsburg resistance. For example, in 1589 he lends a considerable amount of money to the French King Henri IV, which he meets in Rouen, France, in 1593 in support of ending the religious wars with the the Spanish.

Henri IV’s conversion to Catholicism (« Paris is worth a mass ») ruined Zerotina’s hope to reproach the Unity of Brethren with the French Huguenots. Befriended with Theodore de Bèze, which he met regularly when studying in Basel and Geneva, Zerotina sent Comenius to study at the Herborn University in Nassau. That University was founded in 1584 by Louis of Nassau, brother of William the Silent, the leader of the revolt of the Netherlands against Habsburg’s Spain. Louis of Nassau, a key international coordinator of the revolt was in permanent contact with the humanist Huguenot leader Gaspard de Coligny in France and with Walsingham, the chancellor of England’s Queen Elisabeth Ist.

Together with Zerotina, Comenius unleashed the revolt of Bohemia of 1618. After spending some time with the guerrilla forces for which he drew a map of Moravia, Comenius went into exile, as bishop of his church, the « Unity Brethren of Bohemia ».

Till his death, he was the soul of the Bohemian resistance, the gray eminence of the Diaspora and the guardian that prevented the Czech language from disappearing, since it was replaced by German in Bohemia. Since wars are only possible if large parts of the population remain uneducated, for Comenius education became the leading edge to fight for Peace.

Opposed to the Jesuit educators who consolidated their own power by education the elites only, Comenius, starting from his conviction that every individual is made in the living image of God, elaborated with great passion a very high level curriculum, which he wanted accessible to all, as he develops this in his « The Great Didactic » (1638).

Following the advice of Erasmus and Vivès, Comenius abolishes corporal punishment and decides to bring boys and girls in the same class. With him, a school needs to be available in every village, free of cost and open to everybody.

Breaking the division between intellectual and manual work, the schools were part-time technical workshops, anticipating France’s Ecole Polytechnique and the Arts et Metiers (technical school to perfect working people), completely oriented towards the joy of discovery. Leibniz idea of academies originated in Comenius’ schools and societies of friends.

For him, as for Leibniz, the body of physics couldn’t walk without the legs of metaphysics. Integrating that transcendence, he strongly rejected the very idea that nature was reducible to a mere aggregate defined by formal laws, and he adamantly lambasted Bacon, Galileo and Descartes for doing so. In stead, nature has to be looked to as a dynamic process defined by the becoming. That becoming is not repetitive, but permanent progression and potentialization: nature has a quality of development, tending towards self-accomplishment and harmony.

He was severely attacked by Descartes’ « Judgment of the Pansophical works » and mocked by Voltaire, who made him appear as Candide‘s naive philosophy teacher « Pangloss ».

Founder of modern pedagogy, he realized children are beings of affection, before becoming beings of reason. Up till those days, ignorant children were often seen as possessed by the devil, a devil which had to be beaten out of them. The French cardinal Pierre de Bérulle, founder of the Oratorians, reflected that mindset when he wrote that « infancy is the most vile and abject state of man’s nature after that of death ».

To make knowledge accessible to all, Comenius revolutionized the dogmas of that educational approach. In well-ordered classrooms, beautifully decorated with maps, classes would last only one hour covering all the domains one fiends in an engraving of Comenius: theology, manual works, music, astronomy, geometry, botany, printing, construction, painting and sculpture.

Comenius taught Latin, but was strongly convinced that every pupil had to master first his mother tongue. That was a total revolution, since up till then, Latin was taught in Latin, and to bad for those who didn’t understand already !

He also will also re-introduce illustrated textbooks (« The sensible world in images »)(1653), which had been stupidly banned from schools to « not invite the senses to disturb the intellect ». For Comenius, images have the same role as a telescope, displacing the field of perception beyond immediate limits.

His ideas, and especially the rapid successes of schools adopting his pedagogy attracted all of Europe and beyond. In 1642, Comenius was hired by Johan Skytte, the influential chancellor of the University of Uppsala, to reorganize the Swedish education system according to his principles. Skytte, an erudite Platonist inspired by Erasmus, will be Gustaphe Adolph’s preceptor and his son Bengt Skytte will be an influential teacher of Leibniz.

Before that job, Comenius discarded a similar offer originating from Richelieu of France and the offer that came from John Winthrop Junior from the United States who offered Comenius to preside Harvard University, newly founded in the Massachussetts Bay Colony of America.

Rembrandt and Forgiveness

To express in art that precise moment where love gives birth to pardon and repentance will be precisely one of Rembrandt’s favorite subjects. The fact that he choose the name Titus for his son, after the roman emperor who supposedly had showed great clemency toward the early Christians, demonstrates that point. But Titus was also the name of a bishop of Creta who was a close collaborator of Apostle Paul.

Rembrandt was fascinated by the figure of Saint-Paul, who used to be after all a roman officer who, through his conversion, showed the possible transformation of each individual for the better, capable of becoming a militant for the good.

Self-portrait as Paul the Apostle.

Rembrandt’s self-portrait of the Rijksmuseum, with the famous « ghost-image » of a badly lit dagger nearly planted his breast supposedly represent him as Saint-Paul, traditionally represented defending Christian faith with the scripture in one hand and the sword in the other.

The bible in the armored hand do appear in that painting, but the sword here seems more as a dagger, suggesting an eventual reference to the name given by Erasmus to his Christian’s manual, the « Enchiridion » after the Greek word egkheiridion (dagger).

The Prodigal Son

In one of Rembrandt’s late works, the « Return of the prodigal son », despite the fact that the work was completed by a pupil, we see how profoundly he dealt with precisely that subject. The expressiveness of the figures is amplified by the nearly life-size representation on the wide canvas (262 x 205 cm).

The father’s eyes, plunged in interior vision, look yonder the small passage by which the son hasarrived, as doubting of the happiness that overwhelms him, since his son « who was dead », « came back to life ».

The son, who installs his convicts head on the father’s abdomen, engages in the act of total repentance. The naked foot who leaves behind the rotten shoe, communicates in a metaphorical way that sinners deed of repentance, offering what he has inside. The father embraces his son by putting his pardoning hands on his shoulders, while the jealous brothers stand by wondering and enraged why so much love is given to the son « who had spoiled the fathers good with prostitutes ».

Three observations indicate Comenius person and thought might have inspired this work.

First, according to all available portraits, the face of the father shows heavy resemblance with the treats of Comenius himself, a well known militant for peace based on repentance and pardon which Rembrandt probably met frequently during that period.

Second, and after a second look, the son doesn’t look European at all, but actually Negroid, which would add to the painting some critical thoughts on the widely practiced slavery of the European powers of those days.

To conclude, one could interpret the parable of the prodigal son in a much larger sense: is this not man itself, son of God, who returns to his father after having wandered on the roads of sin? Comenius, after a moment of nearly total desperation uses that same image in his book The labyrinth of the world and the paradise of the hearth (1623).

Similar to the image employed by the Dutch painter Hieronymous Bosch, in his « ambulant salesman », man gets lost in the multiplicity of the world that leads him to self-destruction, but after a crisis decides to regain divine unity.

In order to add still another dimension to the discussion on the quality of love involved in art, it is useful to contrast our master with the works of the most talented belonging to the tradition of his detractors: Peter-Paul Rubens.

Rembrandt, Rubens and other Philistines

But before investigating Rubens, it is appropriate to consider the following. Despite the fact that Rembrandt came out of the immense intellectual ferment of the late sixteenth century University of Leiden, one of the cradle’s of humanism, one cannot escape the fact that his lashing career would have infatuated many.

Remember, Constantijn Huygens « discovered Rembrandt » in 1629, while still a young millers son running a small boutique with Jan Lievens, asking them to come to Amsterdam and work for the government. (*10).

Rembrandt’s « patron » nevertheless would write without blushing in his diary Mijn Jeugd (my youth) that Peter Paul Rubens, the Flemish baroque painter was « one of the seven marvels of the world ».

Rubens was, before everything else, the talented standard bearer of the « enemy » Counterreformation and its Jesuits army, whose admiration made Rembrandt totally uncomfortable. How could this virtuoso painter be seen as the brightest star on the firmament of painting? According to some, Huygens was looking for « a Dutch Rubens », capable of making shine the « elites » of the nation.

Samson blinded by the Philistines, Rembrandt.

Rembrandt at one point got so irritated with Huygens’ shortsightedness that he
offered him a large painting called Samson blinded by the Philistines. The work, a pastiche of the violent style, painted « à la Rubens », shows roman soldiers gouging out Samson’s eye with a dagger. Did Rembrandt suggest that his Republic (the strong giant) and its representatives were blinded by their own philistinism?

When a little Page becomes a great Leporello

Rembrandt perfectly translates the feeling of revulsion any honest Dutch patriot would have felt in front of Rubens. Had the Dutch elites already forgotten that Peter Paul’s father, Jan Rubens, once a Calvinist city councilor of Antwerp close to the leadership of the revolt of the Netherlands, had severely damaged the integrity of the father of the fatherland by engaging in an extra-conjugal relationship with Anna of Saxen, the unstable spouse of William the Silent?

Humiliated, but with courage and determination, Rubens mother fought as a lioness to free her husband from an uncertain jail. Her son Peter Paul, could not but become the calculated instrument of vengeance against the protestants and an indispensable tool to do away the blame hanging over the family. Hence, at the age of twelve, Peter Paul was sent to the special college of Romualdus Verdonck, a private school specifically designed to train the shock troops of the Counterreformation.

From there on, Rubens becomes a pageboy at the little court of Marguerite de Ligne, countess de Lalaing at Oudenaarde, whose descendants still form the Royal blood of today’s Belgium. As a kid, Rubens copied the biblical images of the woodprints of Holbein and the Swiss engraver Tobias Stimmer. After two waves of iconoclasm (1566 and 1581), the Counterreformation was very eager to recruit image-makers of all kinds, but under strict regulations specified by the final session of the Council of Trent in 1563. (*12).

After a short training by Abraham van Noort, Rubens career was boosted by his entering of the workshop of Otto van Veen. Born in Leiden in 1556 and trained by the Jesuits, « Venius » was the pupil of the master-courtier Federico Zuccari in Rome. Zuccari was the court painter of Habsburg’s Philippe II of Spain and the founder of the « Accademia di San Luca ». Traveling from court to court, Venius succeeded in getting the favors of Alexander Farnèse, the malign Spanish governor in charge of occupying Flanders.

Farnèse, who actually organized the successful assassination of the father of the Netherlands, the erasmian humanist William the Silent in 1584, nominated Venius as his court painter and as engineer of the Royal armies.

Furthermore, Venius will be the man who opened Rubens mind on Antiquity and together they will read and comment classical authors in Latin. Especially, he will show Rubens that an artist, if he wants to attain glory during his lifetime, must appeal a little bit to his talent and a very much to the powerful.

In Italia

In may 1600, Rubens rides his horse to Venice. In June, during Carnival he encounters the Duke of Mantua, Vincent of Gonzague, who is the cousin of archduke Albert who is ruling then Flanders with Isabella since 1598.

The duke of Mantua, the oligarchic type Mozart portrays in his « Don Giovanni » and Verdi explicitly in « Rigoletto », was very fond at the idea to add a « fiamminghi » to his stable.

The court of Mantua, in a competition of magnificence with other courts, notably those of Milan, Florence or Ferrare, employed once the painter Mantegna, the architect Leon Battista Alberti and the codifier of courtly manners Baldassare Castiglione. At the times of Rubens, the court paid the living of poet Torquato Tasso and the composer Monteverdi which wrote in Mantua his « Orpheus » and « Ariane » in 1601.

Galileo was also one of the guests for a short period in 1606. But especially, the Duke had in his possession one of the largest collections of works of art of that period, and his agents in Italy and all over the world were in charge of identifying new works worth becoming part of the collection.

Circle of friends in Mantua, Rubens.

An inventory of 1629 lists three Titian’s, two Raphael’s, one Veronese, one Tintoretto, eleven Giulio Romano’s, three Mantegna’s, two Corregia’s and one Andrea del Sarto amidst others. Similar to Giulio Romano who became the mere instrument of the « scourge of the princes » Pietro Aretino, our Flemish painter became just another Leporello, an obligingly « valet » enslaved by the Duke.

When we look to his self-portrait with his Circle of friends in Mantua, we see a fearful man, who « became somebody » because surrounded by « people who made it » and recognized by the powerful.

In Espagna

Immediately the Duke gave Rubens a truly Herculean task: transport a quite sophisticated present to Philippe III and his prime minister the Duke of Lerma from Mantua to Madrid. On top of a little chariot specially designed for hunting and several boxes of perfume, the core of the present consisted of not less then forty copies of the best paintings of the Duke’s private collection, notably some Raphael‘s and Titians. On top, Rubens’ mission was « to paint the fanciest women of Spain » during his trip. While his patron in Mantua whines for his return, Rubens will deploy his seductive capabilities at the Spanish court which looked far more promising to his career.

Back in Italy, his immediate going to Rome seems an opportune move, since in these days Barocci was held for to old, Guido Reni for to young. Also, Annibale Carracci appeared out of order since suffering from melancholic apoplexies while Caravagio, accused of murder, was hiding on the properties of his patrons, the Colonna’s.

But essentially, Rubens goes to the holy city because he’s enthusiastically promoted there by the Genovese cardinal Giacoma Serra, very impressed by the « splendid portraits » of women Rubens painted for the Spinola-Doria dynasty in Genoa.

Nevertheless, hearing about the imminent death of his mother, Rubens rushes to Antwerp, and after much a hesitation settles his workshop there, far at a distance from the centers of power, but close to the fabulous privileges he obtains from the Spanish regents over the Netherlands, Albrecht and Isabella.

In Antwerpia

Rubens house in Antwerp (reconstruction of 1910)

These advantages were such that conspiracy-theorist see them as sufficient proof that there was a blueprint to kill the soul of the Erasmian spirit in Christian painting in the region.

First, Rubens will receive 500 guilders per year without any obligation concerning his artistic output except the double portrait of the rulers, any supplementary order necessitating separate payment.

Next, Rubens obtains a status permitting him to bypass the regulations and obligations of the Saint-Luc painters guild, particularly the rule that limits the number of pupils and the amount of their salary. And since a lot is never enough, Rubens obtains a tax-exemption status in Antwerp! As a real patrician he orders the building of his palace.

Broken down long time ago, and for whatever reasons, one has to observe that it was during the times of Flemish collaboration with Hitler’s Germany (from 1938 to 1946) that his Genovese modeled resort, temporarily recreated in 1910 for the Universal Exposition in Brussels, will be entirely rebuild after the engravings of Jacobus Harrewijn of 1692, decorated as the original and the interior filled with fitting old furniture (*14).

It is true that his enthusiasm for opulent blondes and violent action was interpreted by Nazi historians as the expression of profound sympathy for the Nordic races, while his visual energy was seen as the antithesis of « degenerated » art. The Rubens cult in Antwerp might tell us something interesting about the recurrent rise of rightwing extremism in that city.

Propaganda Genius

Rubens feat was to « merchandize » the ruling taste of the oligarchy of his time. Similar to the German filmmaker Leni Riefenstahl under Hitler, Rubens became the genial producer of their propaganda. Precocious child and brilliant draughtsman, he had spent hours and hours working after Italian collections and bas-reliefs in the ruins of Rome.

Since the « Warrior-pope » Julius II and Leo X took over the Vatican, art had to submit to the dictatorship of the degenerated taste of imperial Rome. Eight years of work, from 1600 to 1608, in Genoa, Mantua, Florence, Rome, without forgetting Madrid, with free access to nearly all the great collections of antiquities and paintings of the old families, enabled Rubens to constitute a « data-base », whose fructification will generate the bulk of his fortune.

Specialists do point easily to the unending stream of visual quotes identified in his works. A group of Michelangelo in « The Baptism of Christ » (Koninklijk Museum voor Schone Kunsten, Antwerp); a pose of Raphael’s Aristotle in the School of Athens in his « St-Gregory with St-Domitilla, St-Maurus and Papianus » (Gemäldegalerie, Berlin) or one of his Madonna’s in « The fall of man » (Rubenshuis, Antwerp), without forgetting a head of the Laocone in the « Elevation of the Cross » (Cathedral, Antwerp) or the « contraposto » of a Venus coming straight away from a roman statuary in « The union of Earth and Water » (Hermitage, Saint-Petersburg). (*11).

The Tulip, Seneca plus Ultra

The four philosophers, Rubens.

The desire to be accepted by the ruling oligarchs becomes even clearer when we discover his admiration for Seneca.

Through his education and under the influence of his brother Philippe, Peter Paul Rubens will become a fanatical follower of the Roman neo-stoic Seneca (4 BC – 65 AC). In his painting The four philosophers, Rubens paints himself standing, once again « on the map » with those who got a chair at the table.

With a view on the palatine hill in the background, site of the Apollo cult considered the authentic Rome, we see his brother Philippe, a renowned jurist, sitting across the leading stoic ideologue of those days, Justus Lipsius and his pupil Wowerius, all situated beneath a niche filled with a bust of Seneca honored by a vase with four tulips, two of them closed, and the other two opened.

Originally from Persia, the tulip bulb was brought from Turkey to Europe by an Antwerp diplomat in 1560. Its culture degenerated rapidly from a hobby for gentleman-botanist into the immense collective folly known as the Tulip Mania and « tulip-bubble » or « Windhandel » (wind-trade).

That gigantic speculative bubble bursted in Haarlem on February 2, 1637, while some days earlier, a tulip with the name of « vice-roy » went for 2500 guilders, paid in real goods being two units of wheat and four of rye, four fat calves, eight pigs, a dozen of sheep, two barrels of wine, four tons of butter, a thousand pounds of cheese, a bed and a silver kettle drum (*14).

« Rubens in his garden with Helena Fourment »

As can be seen in his painting Rubens in his garden with Helena Fourment, Rubens was not indifferent to that highly profitable business. Behind the master and his spouse, appears discretely behind a tree in Rubens garden a rich field of tulips!

But in the « Four philosophers », the tulip is nothing else than a metaphor of the « Brevity of life », an essay of Seneca.

The latter, tutor of Nero, preached a Roman form of sharp cynicism known under the label of fatum (fatality): to rise to (Roman) grandeur, man must cultivate absolute resignation. By an active retreat of oneself on oneself and by a obstinate denegation of a threatening and absurd world, man discovers his over-powerful self. That power even increases, if the self decides that death means nothing.

At the opposite of Socrates, who accepted to die for giving birth to the truth, Seneca makes his suicide his main existential deed. Waiting for his hour, his job is to steer his boredom by managing alternating pleasures and pains in a world where good and bad have no more sense.

As all cases of radical Aristotelianism, that philosophy, or « art of life » steers us in the hell of dualism, separating « reason », cleaned from any emotion, from the unbridled horses driving our senses. These two ways of being unfree makes us a double fool. Rubens fronts for that philosophy in his work Drunk Silenus.

Drunk Silenus, Rubens.

The excess of alcohol evacuates all reason and brings man back to his bestial state, a state which Rubens considers natural. Instead of being a polemic, the painting reveals all the complacency of the painter-courtier with the concept of man being enslaved by blind passion. Instead of fighting it, as Friedrich Schiller outlines the case repeatedly and most explicitly in his « On the Esthetical Education of Mankind », Rubens cultivates that dualism and takes pleasure in it. And sincerely tries to recruit the viewer to that obscene and degrading worldview.

Peace IS war

Peace and War, Rubens.

As an example of « allegories », let us look for a moment at Rubens canvas Peace and War.

Above all, that painting is nothing but a glittering « business-card » as one understands knowing the history of the painting. At one point, Rubens, who had become a diplomat thanks to his international relations, organized successfully the conclusion of a peace-treaty between Spain and England (which collapsed fairly soon).

Repeating that for him « peace » was based on the unilateral capitulation of the Netherlands (reunification of the Catholic south with the North ordered to abandon Protestantism), he succeeded entering the Spanish diplomatic servicesomething pretty unusual for a Flemish subject, in particular during the revolt of the Netherlands.

Following this diplomatic success, the painter is threefold knighted: by the Court of Madrid to which he presents a demand to obtain Spanish nationality; by the Court of Brussels and also by the King of England!

Before leaving that country, he offers his painting « Peace and War » to King Charles. The canvas goes as follows: Mars is repelled by wisdom, represented as Minerva, the goddess protecting Rome. Peace is symbolized by a woman directing the flow of milk spouting out of her breast towards the mouth of a little Pluto. In the mean time a satyr with goat hooves displays the corn of abundance…

On the far left, a blue sky enters on stage while on the right the clouds glide away as carton accessories of a theatre. Rubens main argument here for peace is not a desire for justice, but the increase of pleasures and gratifications resulting from the material objects which men could accumulate under peace arrangements! Ironically, seen the cupidity of the ruling Dutch elites, which Rembrandt would lambaste uncompromisingly, it seems that Rubens might have succeeded in convincing these elites to sell the Republic for a handful of tulips. If only his art would have been something else then self-glorification! Here, his style is purely didactical, copied from the Italian mannerism Leonardo despised so much.

Instead of using metaphors capable to make people think and discover ideas, the art of Rubens is to illustrate symbolized allegories. The beauty of an invisible idea has never, and can not be brought to light by this insane iconographical approach. His « style » will be so impersonal that dozens of assistants, real slave laborers, will be generously used for the expansion of his enterprise.

King Christian IV’s physician, Otto Sperling, who visits Rubens in 1621 reported:

« While still painting he was hearing Tacitus read aloud to him and at the same time was dictating a letter. When we kept silent so as not to disturb him with our talk, he himself began to talk to us while still continuing to work, to listen to the reading and to dictate his letter, answering our questions and then displaying his astonishing power. »

« Then he charged a servant to lead us through his magnificent palace and to show us his antiquities and Greek and Roman statues which he possessed in considerable number. We then saw a broad studio without windows, but which captured the light of the day through an aperture in the ceiling. There, were united a considerable amount of young painters occupied each with a different work of which M. Rubens had produced the design by his pencil, heightened with colors at certain points. These models had to be executed completely in paint by the young people till finally, M. Rubens administered with his own hand the final touch.

« All these works came along as painted by Rubens himself, and the man, not satisfied to merely accumulate an immense fortune by operating in this manner, has been overwhelmed with honors and presents by kings and princes ». (*15).

We know, for example, that between 1609 and 1620, not less than sixty three altars were fabricated by « Rubens, Inc. ». In 1635, in a letter to his friend Pereisc, when the thirty years war is ravaging Europe, Rubens states cynically « let us leave the charge of public affairs to those who’s job it is ».

The painter asks and obtains a total discharge of his public responsibilities the same year while retiring to enjoy a private life with his new young partner.

Painter of Agapè, versus painter of Eros

Being a human, Rembrandt correctly had thousand reasons to be allergic to Rubens. The latter was not simply « on the wrong side » politically, but produced an art inspiring nothing but lowness: portraits designated to flatter the pride of the mighty by making shine and glitter some shabby gentry; history scenes being permanent apologies of Roman fascism where, under the varnish of pseudo-Catholicism, the alliance of the violent forces of nature and iron-cold reason dominated. Behind the « art of living » of Seneca, there stood the brutal methods of manipulation of the perfect courtier described by Baldassare Castiglione in his « Courtier ». For courtly ethics, everything stands with balance (sprezzatura) and appearance, and behind the mask of nice epithets operates the savage passions of seduction, possession, rape and power-games.

On the opposite, Rembrandt is the pioneer of interiority, of the creative sovereignty of each individual. To show the beauty of that interiority, why not underline paradoxically exterior ugliness?

In the « Old man and young boy » of Domenico Ghirlandajo, an imperfect appearance unveils a splendid beauty. The old man has a terribly looking nose, but the visual exchange between him and the boy shows a quality of love which transcends both of them. At the opposite of Seneca, they don’t contemplate the « brevity of life », but the longevity or « immortality of the soul ».

Martin Luther King, in a sermon tries equally to define these different species of love. After defining Eros (carnal love), and Philia (brotherly love), he says:

« And then the Greek language comes out with another word. It’s the word agape. Agape is more than Eros; it’s more than an aesthetic or romantic love; it is more than friendship. Agape is understanding, creative, redemptive goodwill for all men. It is an overflowing love which seeks nothing in return. Theologians would say that it is the love of God operating in the human heart. And so when one rises to love on this level, he loves every man, not because he likes him, not because his ways appeal to him, but he loves every man because God loves him, and he rises to the level of loving the person who does an evil deed, while hating the deed that the person does. » (*17)

Then, King shows how that love intervenes into the political domain:

« If I hit you and you hit me and I hit you back and you hit me back and go on, you see, that goes on ad infinitum. It just never ends. Somewhere somebody must have a little sense, and that’s the strong person.

The strongperson is the person who can cut off the chain of hate, the chain of evil. And that is the tragedy of hate, that it doesn’t cut it off. It only intensifies the existence of hate and evil in the universe. Somebody must have religion enough and morality enough to cut it off and inject within the very structure of the universe that strong and powerful element of love. »

You probably understood our point here. Martin Luther King, in his battle for justice, was living in the same « temporal eternity » as Rembrandt and Comenius opposing the thirty years war. Isn’t that a most astonishing truth: that the most powerful political weapon at man’s disposal is nothing but transforming universal love, over more available to everyone on simple demand? But to become a political weapon, that universal love cannot remain a vague sentiment or fancy romantic concept. Strengthened by reason, Agapè can only reach height with the wings of philosophy.

Rembrandt and Comenius knew that « secret », which will remain a secret for the oligarchs, if they remain what they are. »

The Little Fur

Another comparison between two paintings will make the difference even more clearer between Eros and Agapè: Het pelsken (the little fur) of Rubens (left) and Hendrickje bathing in a river of Rembrandt (right).

That comparison has a particular significance since the two paintings show the young wives of both painters. At the age of fifty-three Rubens remarried the sixteen year old Helena Fourment, while Rembrandt settled at the age of forty-three with the twenty-two year old Hendrickje Stoffels.

The naked Helena Fourment, with staring eyes, and while effecting an hopeless gesture of pseudo-chastity, pulls a black fur coat over her shoulders. The stark color contrast between the pale body skin and the deep dark fur, a typical baroque dramatic touch of Rubens, unavoidably evokes basic instincts. No wonder that this canvas was baptized the « little fur » by those who composed the catalogues.

However, paradoxically, Hendrickje is lifting her skirt to walk in the water, but entirely free from any erotic innuendo! Her hesitating, tender steps in the refreshing water seem dominated by her confident smile. Here, the viewer is not some « Peeping Tom » intruding into somebody’s private life, but another human being invited to share a moment of beauty and happiness.

Suzanne and the Elderly

Another excellent example is the way the two painters paint the story of Suzanne and the elderly. Comenius, was so impassioned by this story that in 1643 he called his daughter Zuzanna in 1646 his son Daniel. This Biblical parable (Daniel 13) deals with a strong notion of justice, quite similar to the one already developed in Greece by Sophocles Antigone. In both cases, in the name of a higher law, a young woman defies the laws of the city.

In her private garden, far from intruding viewers, the beautiful Suzanne gets watched on by two judges which will try to blackmail her: or you submit to our sexual requests, or we will accuse you of adultery with a young man which just escaped from here! Suzanne starts shouting and refuses to submit to their demands. The next day, Suzanne gets accused publicly by the judges (the strongest) in front of her family, but Daniel, a young man convinced of her innocence, takes her defense and unmasks the false proofs forged by the judges. At the end, the judges receive the sentence initially slated for Suzanne.

Suzanna and the Elder, Rubens.

In the Rubens painting, a voluptuous Suzanne lifts her desperate eyes imploring divine help from heaven. The image incarnates the dominant but
insane ideology of both Counterreformation Catholicism and radical Protestantism: the denial of the free will, and thus of the incapacity to obtain divine grace through one’s acting for the good. For the Calvinist/protestant ideologues, the soul was predestinated for good or evil. Reacting by a simple inversion to the crazy indulgences, it was « logical » that no earthly action could « buy » divine grace. So whatever one did, whatever our commitment for doing the good on earth, nothing could derail God’s original design. The Counterreformation Catholics thought pretty much the same, except that one could claim God’s indulgence in the context of the rites of the Roman Catholic Church, especially by paying the indulgences: « No salvation outside the church ».

Suzanne and the elderly, Rembrandt.

In a spectacular way, Rembrandt’s Suzanne and the elderly reinstates the real evangelical Christian humanist standpoint: a chaste Suzanne looks straight in the eyes of the viewer which is witnessing the terrible injustice happening right under his nos. So, will you be the new Daniel? Will you find the courage to intervene against the laws of the State to defend a « Divine » justice? Hence, agapè is that infinite love for justice and truth, that leads you to courageous action and makes you a sublime personality capable of changing history, in the same way Antigone, Jeanne d’Arc, or Suzanne did before.

Plato versus Aristotle

The fact that Rembrandt was a philosopher is regularly put into question, even denied. The inventory of his goods, established when his enemies forced him into bankruptcy in 1654, doesn’t mention any book outside a huge bible, supposedly establishing a legitimate suspicion of him being near to illiteracy. While romanticized biographies portray him as an accursed poet, a narcissistic genius or the simple-minded mystical visionary son of a miller, a comment in 1641 from the artist Philips Angel underscores, not his painting, but Rembrandt’s « elevated and profound reflection ».

Aristotle contemplating Homer’s bust, Rembrandt.

It is Aristotle contemplating Homer’s bust, which demonstrates once and for ever how stupid the Romantics can be. Ordered by an Italian nobleman, the painting shows Aristotle as a Venetian aristocrat, as a perfect courtier: with a wide white shirt, a large black hat and especially carrying a heavy golden chain.

In short, clothed as Castiglione, Aretino, Titian and Rubens… Rembrandt shows here his intimate knowledge of the species nature of Plato’s enemies of the Republic, that oligarchy to whom Aristotelianism became a quasi-religion.

With great irony, the canvas completely mocks knowledge derived from the « blind » submittal to sense perception. Here Rembrandt seems to join Erasmus of Rotterdam saying « experience is the school of fools! ».

Equipped with empty eyes, incapable of perception, Aristotle is groping with an uncertain hand Homer’s head of which he was supposedly a knowledgeable commentator. Homer, the Greek poet who turned blind, stares worriedly to Aristotle with the open eyes of mind.

That inversion of the respective roles of Aristotle and Homer is dramatized by situating the source enlightening the scene as a tangent behind the bust of the poet.

Light reflections illuminating Aristotle’s hat underneath make appear the ironical « ghost image » of donkey ears, the conventional attribute widely used since the Renaissance to designate the stubbornness of scholastic Aristotelianism.

To this Aristotelian blindness, Rembrandt, whose own father became blind, opposes the other clear-sightedness of Simeon, as seen in his last painting, found on Rembrandt’s easel after his death.

All during his life, Simeon had wished to see the Christ with his own eyes. But, growing old, that hope quitted him with along with his sight. As he did every day, Simeon went one day to the temple. There, Maria asked him to keep her child in his arms. Suddenly, an infinite joy
overwhelmed Simeon, who, without seeing Christ with his mortal eyes, saw him much more clearly with his mind than all the healthy seers. Rembrandt wanted us to reflect on that conviction: don’t believe what you see, but act coherently with God’s design and you might see him. On Simeon’s hands, a series of dashes of paint suggest some kind of crystal ball, an image which only « appears » when our minds dares to see it, underlining Simeon’s prophetic nature.

Jesus Christ healing the sick

Christ healing the sick, etching, Rembrandt.

Rembrandt’s anti-Aristotelian philosophy is also explicitly manifest in an engraving known as Christ healing the sick, an exceptionally large etching on which he worked passionately over a six year period. In order to « sculpt » the ambiguous image of the Christ, son of both God and mankind, Rembrandt executed six oil portraits featuring young rabbi’s of Amsterdam. But it was Leonardo’s fresco, the Last Supper, which Rembrandt extensively studied as shown by drawings done after reproductions, that seems to have been his starting point.

Scientific analysis of his still existing copperplate indicate that the Christ’s hands were originally drawn as an exact imitation of Leonardo’s « Last Supper » fresco.

Completely different from the kind of « spotlight theatrics » that go from Caravagio to Hitchcock, the work reminds the description of the myth of the cavern in Plato’s Republic. But here stands the Christ blessing the sick.

Transfigured, and akin to the prisoners in Beethoven’s opera Fidelio, the sick people walk from right to left towards Christ. Encountering the light transforms them into philosophers!

One generally identifies easily, amidst others, Homer and Aristotle (who’s turning his head away from Christ), but also Erasmus and Saint-Peter, which according to some possesses here the traits of Socrates.

The etching brings together in a single instant eternal several sequences of Chapter XIX of Saint Mathew:

“Let the little children come to me, and do not hinder them, for the kingdom of heaven belongs to such as these.”

In a powerful gesture, Christ brushes aside even the best of all wise wisdom to make his love the priority, where Peter desperately tries to prevent the children from being presented to Jesus.

Sitting close to him we observe the image of an undecided young wealthy man plunged in profound doubts, since he desired eternal life but hesitated to sell his possessions and give it all to the poor.

When he left, Jesus commented that it was certainly easier for a camel to get through the eye of a needle, than for a rich man to enter the his kingdom.

Above simple earthly space situated in clock-ticking time, the action takes place in « the time of all times », an instantaneous eternity where human minds are measured with universality, some kind of « last judgment » of divine and philosophical consciousness.

The healing of the sick souls and bodies is the central breaking point which articulates the two universes, the one of sin and suffering, with the one of the good and happiness. Christ’s love, metaphorized as light, heals the « sick » and makes philosopher-kings out of them. They appear nearly as apostles and figure exactly on the same level as the apostles of Leonardo‘s milan fresco The last Supper. Brought out of darkness into the light, they become themselves sources of light capable of illuminating many others.

That « light of Agapè » is the single philosophical basis of Rembrandt’s revolution in the techniques of oil-painting: in stead of starting drawing and paint on a white gesso underground or lightly colored under-paint (the so-called priming, eventually adding imprimatura), all the later works are painted on a dark, even black under-paint!

The « modern » thick impasto, possible through the use of Venetian turpentine and the integration of bee wax, are revived by Rembrandt from the ancient « encaustic » techniques described by Pliny the Elder. They were employed by the School of Sycione three hundred years before Christ and gave us Alexander the Great‘s court painter Apelles, and the Fayoum mommy paintings in Alexandria, Egypt (*17).

Building the color-scale inversely permitted Rembrandt to reduce his late palette to only six colors and made him into a « sculptor of light ». His indirect pupil, Johannes Vermeer, systemized Rembrandt’s revolutionary discovery (*18).

Deprived of much earthly glory during their lives, Rembrandt and Comenius were immediately scrapped from official history by the oligarchic monsters that survived them. But their lives represent important victories for humanity. Their political, philosophical, esthetical and pedagogical battles against the oligarchy and its « valets » as Rubens, makes them eternal.

They are and will remain inexhaustible sources of inspiration for today’s and tomorrows combat.

NOTES:

  1. Karel Vereycken, « Rembrandt, bâtisseur de nation« , Nouvelle Solidarité, June 1985.
  2. The treatises of Westphalia (Munster and Osnabruck) of 1648, and the ensuing separate peace accords between France and the Netherlands with Spain, finally shred into pieces every political, philosophical and juridical argument serving as basis of the notion of empire, and by doing so put an end to Habsburg’s imperial fantasy, the « Thirty years war ». As some had outlined before, notably French King Henry IV’s great advisor Sully in his concept of « Grand Design », making the sovereign nation-state the highest authority for international law was, and remains today, the only safe road to guaranty durable peace. Empires, by definition, mean nothing but perpetual wars. If you want perpetual war, create an empire! Hence, through this revolution, small countries obtained the same rights as those held by large ones and the notions of big= strong, and small=weak, went out of the window. The Hobbesian idea that « might makes right » was abolished and replaced by mutual cooperation as the sole basis of international relations between sovereign nation-states. Hence, tiny Republics, as Switzerland or the Netherlands,the latter at war with Spain for nearly eighty years, finally obtained peace and international recognition. Second, and that’s undoubtedly the most revolutionary part of the agreements, mutual pardon became the core of the peace accords. For example paragraph II stipulated explicitly « that there shall be on the one side and the other a perpetual Oblivion, Amnesty or Pardon of all that has been committed since the beginning of these Troubles, in what place, or what manner soever the Hostilitys have been practis’d, in such a manner, that no body, under any pretext whatsoever, shall practice any Acts of Hostility, entertain any Enmity, or cause any Trouble to each other; » (translation: Foreign Office, London). Moreover, several paragraphs (XIII, XXXV, XXXVII, etc.) stipulate (with some exceptions) that there will be a general debt forgiveness concerning financial obligations susceptible of maintaining a dynamic of perpetual vengeance. In reality, the Peace of Westphalia was the birth of new political order, based on the creation of a new international economic and monetary system necessary to build peace on the ruins of the bankrupt imperial order.
  3. Footnote, p. 77 in Comenius by Olivier Cauly, Editions du Félin, Paris, 1995.
  4. Brochure dealing with that painting published by the Nationalmuseum of Stockholm.
  5. To put to an end to the politically motivated financial harassment which was organized by the family of his deceased wife, Saskia van Uylenburgh, Rembrandt submits on July 14, 1656 to the Dutch High Court a cessio bonorum (Cessation of goods to the profit of the creditors), accepting the sale of his goods. In 1660, Rembrandt abandons the official management of his art trading society to his wife Hendrickje Stoffels and his son Titus.
  6. p. 105, Henriette L.T.de Beaufort, in Rembrandt, HDT Willinck & Zoon, Harlem, 1957.
  7. p. 358, Samuel Hartlib and Universal Reformation, Cambridge University Press, 1994.
  8. p. 12-13, Bob van den Bogaert, in « Goethe & Rembrandt », Amsterdam University Press, Amsterdam 1999.
  9. p. 25, Marcelle Denis in Comenius, pédagogies & pédagogues, Presse Universitaire de France, 1994.
  10. Constantijn Huygens (1596-1687), was an exceptional precocious erudite. Politician, scientist, moralist, music composer, he played the violin at the age of six, wrote poems in Dutch, Latin, French, Spanish, English and Greek. His satire, « ‘t Kostelick Mal » (expensive folly), opposed to the « Profijtelijk Vermaak » (profitable amusement) makes great fun of courtly manners and the then rampant beaumondism. His son, Christiaan Huygens was a brilliant scientist and collaborator of Leibniz at the Paris Academy of sciences.
  11. One has to outline shortly here that contrary to the rule of the Greek canon of proportions (height of man = seven heads and a half), the Romans, as Leonardo seems to observe sourly in his drawing reworking Vitrivius, increase the body size up to eight and sometimes many more heads. It was the Greek canon established after the « Doryphore » of Polycletius, which settled the matter much earlier after many Egyptian inquiries on these matters. Leonardo, who wasn’t a fool, realized Vitruvius proportions (8 heads) are wrong, as can be seen by the two belly-buttons appearing in the famous man bounded by square and circle. Hence, the proportional « reduction » of the head was an easy trick to create the illusion of a stronger, more powerful musculature. That image of a biological man displaying « small head, big muscles » supposedly stood as the ultimate expression of Roman heroism. Foreknowledge of this arrangement permits the viewer to identify accurately what philosophy the painter is adhering to: Greek humanist or Roman oligarch? That Rubens chose Rome rather than Athens, leaves no doubt, as proven by his love for Seneca.
  12. « The holy Council states that it isn’t permitted to anybody, in any place or church, to install or let be installed an unusual image, unless it has been approved so by the bishop »; « finally any indecency shall be avoided, of that sort that the images will not be painted or possess ornaments of provoking beauty… » P. 1575-77, t. II-2, in G. Alberigo, « The ecumenical Councils », quoted by Alain Taton (p. 132) in « The Council of Trent », editions du CERF, Paris, 2000.
  13. p. 172, Simon Schama, in his magnificent Rembrandt’s eyes, Knopf, New York, 1999.
  14. For a more elaborate description of the tulip-bubble, Simon Schama, p. 471, « L’embarras de richesses, La culture hollandaise au Siècle d’Or », Gallimard, Paris, 1991.
  15. p. 117, Otto Sperling, Christian IV’s doctor, quoted by Marie-Anne Lescouret in her biography Pierre-Paul Rubens, J.C. Lattès, Paris, 1990.
  16. « Love your enemies », sermon of Martin Luther King, November 17, 1957, Dexter Avenue Baptist Church, Montgomery, Alabama. Quoted in Martin Luther King, Minuit, quelqu’un frappe à la porte, p.63, Bayard, Paris 1990.
  17. p. 87-88, Karel Vereycken, in The gaze from beyond, Fidelio, Vol. VIII, n°2, summer 1999.
  18. Johannes Vermeer of Delft was a close friend of Karel Fabritius, the most outstanding pupil of Rembrandt, who died at the age of thirty-four when the powderkeg of Delft exploded. Vermeer became the executor of his last will, a role generally reserved for the closest friend or relative. Anthonie van Leeuwenhoek, the inventor of the microscope and Leibniz correspondent, will become in turn the executor of Vermeer’s last will. That filiation does nothing more than prove the constant cross-fertilization of the artistic and scientific milieu. The Dutch « intimist » school, of which Vermeer is the most accomplished representative, is the most explicit expression of a « metaphysical » transcendence, transposed for political reasons, from the domain of religion, into the beauty of daily life scenes.

SELECTED BIBLIOGRAPHY:

  • Baudiquey, Paul, Le retour du prodigue, Editions Mame, 1995, Paris.
  • Bély, Lucien, L’Europe des Traités de Westphalie, esprit de la diplomatie et diplomatie de l’esprit, Presses Universitaires de France, Paris, 2000.
  • Callot, Jacques, etchings, Dover, New York, 1974.
  • Castiglione, Baldassare, Le Livre du Courtisan, GF-Flammarion, 1991.
  • Cauly, Olvier, Comenius, Editions du Félin, Paris, 1995.
  • Clark, Kenneth, An introduction to Rembrandt, Readers Union, Devon, 1978.
  • Comenius, La Grande Didactique, Editions Klincksieck, Paris, 1992.
  • Denis, Marcelle, Comenius, Presses Universitaires de France, Paris 1994.
  • Descargues, Pierre, Rembrandt, JC Lattès, 1990.
  • Goethe Rembrandt, Tekeningen uit Weimar, Amsterdam University Press, 1999.
  • Grimberg, Carl, Histoire Universelle, Marabout Université, Verviers, 1964.
  • Haak, B., Rembrandt, zijn leven, zijn werk, zijn tijd, De Centaur, Amsterdam.
  • Hobbes, Thomas, Le Citoyen ou les fondements de la politique, Garnier Flammarion, Paris, 1982.
  • Jerlerup, Törbjorn, Sweden und der Westphalische Friede, Neue Solidarität, mai 2000.
  • King, Martin Luther, Minuit, quelqu’un frappe à la porte, Bayard, Paris, 2000.
  • Komensky, Jan Amos, Le labyrinthe du monde et le paradis du cœur, Desclée, Paris, 1991.
  • Lescourret, Marie Anne, Pierre-Paul Rubens, JC Lattès, Paris, 1990.
  • Marienfeld Barbara, Johann Amos Comenius : Die Kunst, alle Menschen alles zu lehren. Neue Solidarität.
  • Rembrandt and his pupils, Nationalmuseum, Stockholm, 1993.
  • Sénèque, Entretiens, Editions Bouquins, Paris, 1993.
  • Schama Simon, Rembrandt’s Eyes, Knopf, New York 1999.
  • Schama, Simon, L’embarras de richesses, La culture hollandaise au Siècle d’Or, Gallimard, 1991.
  • Schiller, Friedrich, traduction de Regnier, Vol. 6, Histoire de la Guerre de Trente ans, Paris, 1860.
  • Sutton, Peter C., Le Siècle de Rubens, Mercatorfonds, Albin Michel, Paris, 1994.
  • Tallon, Alain, Le Concile de Trente, CERF, Paris, 2000.
  • Tümpel, Christian, Rembrandt, Fonds Mercator-Albin Michel, 1986.
  • Van Lil, Kira, La peinture du XVIIème siècle aux Pays-Bas, en Allemagne et en Angleterre, dans l’art du Baroque, Editions Köneman, 1998, Cologne.


Merci de partager !

Erasmus’ dream: the Leuven Three Language College

In autumn 2017, a major exhibit organized at the University library of Leuven and later in Arlon, also in Belgium, attracted many people. Showing many historical documents, the primary intent of the event was to honor the activities of the famous Three Language College (Collegium Trilingue), founded in 1517 by the efforts of the Christian Humanist Erasmus of Rotterdam (1467-1536) and his allies. Though modest in size and scope, Erasmus’ initiative stands out as one of the cradles of European civilization, as you will discover here.

Revolutionary political figures, such as William the Silent (1533-1584), organizer of the Revolt of the Netherlands against the Habsburg tyranny, humanist poets and writers such as Thomas More, François Rabelais, Miguel Cervantes and William Shakespeare, all of them, recognized their intellectual debt to the great Erasmus of Rotterdam, his exemplary fight, his humor and his great pedagogical project.

For the occasion, the Leuven publishing house Peeters has taken through its presses several nice catalogues and essays, published in Flemish, French as well as English, bringing together the contributions of many specialists under the wise (and passionate) guidance of Pr Jan Papy, a professor of Latin literature of the Renaissance at the Leuven University, with the assistance of a “three language team” of Latinists which took a fresh look at close to all the relevant and inclusively some new documents scattered over various archives.

The Leuven Collegium Trilingue: an appealing story of courageous vision and an unseen international success. Thanks to the legacy of Hieronymus Busleyden, counselor at the Great Council in Mechelen, Erasmus launched the foundation of a new college where international experts would teach Latin, Greek and Hebrew for free, and where bursaries would live together with their professors”, reads the back cover of one of the books.

University of Leuven, Belgium.

For the researchers, the issue was not necessarily to track down every detail of this institution but rather to answer the key question: “What was the ‘magical recipe’ which attracted rapidly to Leuven between three and six hundred students from all over Europe?”

Erasmus’ initiative was unprecedented. Having an institution, teaching publicly Latin and, on top, for free, Greek and Hebrew, two languages considered “heretic” by the Vatican, was already tantamount to starting a revolution.

Was it that entirely new? Not really. As early as the beginning of the XIVth century, for the Italian humanists in contact with Greek erudites in exile in Venice, the rigorous study of Greek, Hebraic and Latin sources as well as the Fathers and the New Testament, was the method chosen by the humanists to free mankind from the Aristotelian worldview suffocating Christianity and returning to the ideals, beauty and spirit of the “Primitive Church”.

For Erasmus, as for his inspirer, the Italian humanist Lorenzo Valla (1403-1457), the « Philosophy of Christ » (agapic love), has to come first and opens the road to end the internal divisions of Christianity and to uproot the evil practices of greed (indulgences, simony) and religious superstition (cult of relics) infecting the Church from the top to the bottom, and especially the mendicant orders.

To succeed, Erasmus sets out to clarify the meaning of the Holy Writings by comparing the originals written in Greek, Hebrew and Latin, often polluted following a thousand years of clumsy translations, incompetent copying and scholastic commentaries.

Brothers of the Common Life

My own research allows me to recall that Erasmus was a true disciple of the Sisters and Brothers of the Common Life of Deventer in the Netherlands, a hotbed of humanism in Northern Europe. The towering figures that founded this lay teaching order are Geert Groote (1340-1384), Florent Radewijns (1350-1400) and Wessel Gansfort (1420-1489), all three said to be fluent in precisely these three languages.

The religious faith of this current, also known as the “Modern Devotion”, centered on interiority, as beautifully expressed in the little book of Thomas a Kempis (1380-1471), the Imitation of Christ. This most read book after the Bible, underlines the importance for the believer to conform one owns life to that of Christ who gave his life for mankind.

Rudolph Agricola

Rudolp Agricola, painted by Cranach.

Hence, in 1475, Erasmus father, fluent in Greek and influenced by famous Italian humanists, sends his son to the chapter of the Brothers of the Common Life in Deventer, at that time under the direction of Alexander Hegius (1433-1499), himself a pupil of the famous Rudolph Agricola (1442-1485) which Erasmus had the chance to listen to and which he calls a “divine intellect”.

Follower of the cardinal-philosopher Nicolas of Cusa (1401-1464), enthusiastic advocate of the Italian Renaissance and the Good Letters, Agricola would tease his students by saying:

“Be cautious in respect to all that you learned so far. Reject everything! Start from the standpoint you will have to un-learn everything, except that what is based on your sovereign authority, or on the basis of decrees by superior authors, you have been capable of re-appropriating yourself”.

Erasmus, with the foundation of the Collegium Trilingue will carry this ambition at a level unreached before. To do so, Erasmus and his friend apply a new pedagogy. Hence, instead of learning by heart medieval commentaries, pupils are called to formulate their proper judgment and take inspiration of the great thinkers of the Classical period, especially “Saint Socrates”. Latin, a language that degenerated during the Roman Empire, will be purified from barbarisms.

With this approach, for pupils, reading a major text in its original language is only the start. An explorative work is required: one has to know the history and the motivations of the author, his epoch, the history of the laws of his country, its geography, cosmography, all considered to be indispensable instruments to put each text in its specific literary and historical context and allowing reading, beyond the words, the intention of their author.

Erasmus (left) and his friend Pieter Gilles, by Antwerp painter Quinten Metsijs.

This “modern” approach (questioning, critical study of sources, etc.) of the Collegium Trilingue, after having demonstrated its efficiency by clarifying the message of the Gospel, will rapidly travel over Europe and reach many other domains of knowledge, notably scientific issues! By uplifting young talents, out of the small and sleepy world of scholastic certitudes, this institution rapidly grew into a hotbed for creative minds.

For the ignorant reader who often considers Erasmus as some kind of comical writer praising madness which lost it after an endless theological dispute with Martin Luther, such a statement might come as a surprise.

Scientific Renaissance

Art and science for the people. The early 16th century was a time of early scientific education.

While Belgium’s contributions to science, under Emperor Charles Vth, are broadly recognized and respected, few are those understanding the connection uniting Erasmus with a mathematician as Gemma Frisius and his pupil and friend Gerard Mercator, an anatomist such as Andreas Vesalius or a botanist such as Rembert Dodonaeus.

Hence, as already thoroughly documented in 2011 by Professor Jan Papy in a remarkable article, the scientific renaissance which bloomed in the Netherlands and Belgium in the early XVIth century, could not have taken place if it were for the “linguistic revolution” provoked by the Collegium Trilingue.

Because, beyond the mastery of their vernacular languages (French and Dutch), hundreds of youth, by studying Greek, Latin and Hebrew, suddenly got access to all the scientific treasures of Greek Philosophy and the best authors in those newly discovered languages.

Remains of the old Louvain city wall. In the foreground, the Jansenius tower, in the background, the Justus Lipsius tower.

At last, they could read Plato in the text, but also Anaxagoras, Heraclites, Thales of Millet, Eudoxus of Cnidus, Pythagoras, Eratosthenes, Archimedes, Galen, Vitruvius, Pliny the elder, Euclid and Ptolemy whose work they will master and eventually correct.

As the books published by Peeters account in great detail, during the first century of its existence, the Collegium Trilingue had a rough time confronting political uproar and religious strife. Heavy critique came especially form the “traditionalists”, a handful of theologians for which the Greeks were nothing but schismatics and the Jews the assassins of Christ and esoterics.

The opposition was such that Erasmus himself never could teach at the Collegium and, while keeping in close contact, decided to settle in Basel, Switzerland, in 1521.

Despite all of this, the Erasmian revolution conquered Europe overnight and a major part of the humanists of that period were trained or influenced by this institution. From abroad, hundreds of pupils arrived to follow classes given by professors of international reputation.

27 European universities integrated pupils of the Collegium in their teaching staff: among them stood Jena, Wittenberg, Cologne, Douai, Bologna, Avignon, Franeker, Ingolstadt, Marburg, etc.

Teachers at the Collegium were secured a decent income so that they weren’t obliged to give private lectures to secure a living and could offer public classes for free. As was the common practice of the Brothers of the Common Life in Deventer, a system of bursa allowed talented though poor students, including many orphans, to have access to higher learning. “Something not necessarily unusual those days, says Pr Jan Papy, and done for the sake of the soul of the founder (of the Collegium, reference to Busleyden)”.

Le Wentelsteen, last remaining staircase of the Collegium Trilingue. Crédit : Karel Vereycken

While visiting Leuven and contemplating the worn-out steps of the spiral staircase (wentelsteen), one of the last remains of the building that had a hard time resisting the assaults of time and ignorance, one can easily imagine those young minds jumping down the stairs with enthusiasm going from the dormitory to the classroom. Looking at the old shopping list of the school’s kitchen one can conclude the food was excellent with lots of meat, poultry but also vegetables and fruits, and sometimes wine from Beaune in Burgundy, especially when Erasmus came for a visit! While over the years, of course, the quality of the learning transmitted, would vary in accordance with the excellence of its teachers, the Collegium Trilingue, whose activity would last till the French revolution, gave its imprint in history by giving birth to what some have called the “Little Renaissance” of the first half of the XVIth century.

In France, the Sorbonne University reacted with fear and in 1523, the study of Greek was outlawed in France.

Marguerite de Navarre, reader of Erasmus.

François Rabelais, at that time a monk in Vendée, saw his books confiscated by the prior of his monastery and deserts his order. Later, as a doctor, he translated the medical writings of the Greek scientist Galen from Greek into French. Rabelais’s letter to Erasmus shows the highest possible respect and intellectual debt to Erasmus.

In 1530, Marguerite de Navarre, sister of King Francis, and reader and admirer of Erasmus, at war with the Sorbonne, convinced her brother to allow Guillaume Budé, a friend of Erasmus, to create the “Collège des Lecteurs Royaux” (ancestor of the Collège de France) on the model of the Collegium Trilingue. And to protect its teachers, many coming directly from Leuven, they got the title of “advisors” of the King. The Collège taught Latin, Hebrew and Greek, and rapidly added Arab, Syriac, medicine, botany and philosophy to its curriculum.

Dirk Martens

Dirk Martens.

Also celebrated for the occasion, Dirk Martens (1446-1534), rightly considered as one of the first humanists to introduce printing in the Southern Netherlands.

Born in Aalst in a respected family, the young Dirk got his training at the local convent of the Hermits of Saint William. Eager to know the world and to study, Dirk went abroad. In Venice, at that time a cosmopolite center harboring many Greek erudite in exile, Dirk made his first steps into the art of printing at the workshop of Gerardus de Lisa, a Flemish musician who set up a small printing shop in Treviso, close to Venice.

Back in Aalst, together with his partner John of Westphalia, Martens printed in 1473 the first book in the country with a movable type printing press, a treatise of Dionysius the Carthusian (1401-1471), a friend and collaborator of cardinal-philosopher Nicolas of Cusa, as well as the spiritual advisor of Philip the Good, the Duke of Burgundy and thought to be the occasional « theological » advisor of the latter’s court painter, Jan Van Eyck.

If the oldest printed book known to us is a Chinese Buddhist writing dating from 868, the first movable printing types, made first out of wood and then out of hardened porcelain and metal, came from China and Korea in 1234.

Replica of Martens’ printing press at the Communal Museum of Aalst.

The history of two lovers, a poem written by Aeneas Piccolomini before he became the humanist Pope Pius II, was another early production of Marten’s print shop in Aalst.

Proud to have introduced this new technique allowing a vast increase in the spreading of good and virtuous ideas, Martens wrote in one of the prefaces: “This book was printed by me, Dirk Martens of Aalst, the one who offered the Flemish people all the know-how of Venice”.

After some years in Spain, Martens returned to Aalst and started producing breviaries, psalm books and other liturgical texts. While technically elaborate, the business never reached significant commercial success.

Martens then moved to Antwerp, at that time one of the main ports and cross-roads of trade and culture. Several other Flemish humanists born in Aalst played eminent roles in that city and animate its intellectual and cultural life. Among these:

Cornelis De Schrijver (1482-1558), the secretary of the City of Aalst, better known under his latin name Scribonius and later as Cornelius Grapheus. Writer, translator, poet, musician and friend of Erasmus, he was accused of heresy and hardly escaped from being burned at the stake.

Pieter Gillis (1486-1533), known as Petrus Aegidius. Pupil of Martens, he worked as a corrector in his company before becoming Antwerp’s chief town clerk. Friend of Erasmus and Thomas More, he appears with Erasmus in the double portrait painted by another friend of both, Quinten Metsys (1466-1530).

Pieter Coecke van Aelst (1502-1550), editor, painter and scenographer. After a trip to Italy, he set up a workshop in Antwerp. Pieter will produce patrons for tapestries, translated with the help of his wife the works of the Roman architect Vitruvius into Dutch and trained the young Flemish painter Bruegel the Elder who will marry his daughter.

Invention of pocket books

In Antwerp, Martens became part of this milieu and his workshop became a meeting place for painters, musicians, scientists, poets and writers. With the Collegium Trilingue, Martens opens a second shop, this time in Leuven to work with Erasmus. In order to provide adequate books to the Collegium, Martens proudly became, in the footsteps of the Venetian Printer Aldo Manuce, one of the first printers to concentrate on in-octavo 8° (22 x 12 cm), i.e. “pocket” size books affordable by all and which students could take home !

For the specialists of the Erasmus house of Anderlecht, close to Brussels,

“Martens innovated in nearly all domains. As well as in terms of printing types as lay-out. He was the first to introduce Italics, Greek and Hebrew letter types. He also generalized the use of ‘New Roman’ letter type so familiar today. During the first thirty years of the XVIth century, he also operated the revolution in lay-out (chapters and paragraphs) that gave birth to the modern book as we know it today. All this progress, he achieved in close cooperation with Erasmus”.

Thomas More’s Utopia

1516, pages from Thomas More’s Utopia, printed by Martens in Leuven. On the left, an imaginary map showing the island of Utopia. On the right, the equally imaginary Utopian alphabet.

In 1516, it was Dirk Martens who printed the first edition of Thomas More’s Utopia. Among the hundreds of editions he printed mostly alone, 61 books and writings of Erasmus, notably In Praise of Folly. He also produced More’s edition of the roman satirist Lucian and Columbus’ account of the discovery of the new world. In 1423, Martens printed the complete works of Homer, quite a challenge!

In 1520, a papal bull of Leo X condemned the errors of Martin Luther and ordered the confiscation of his writings to be burned in public in front of the clergy and the people.

For Erasmus, burning books didn’t automatically erased their their content from the minds of the people. “One starts by burning books, one finishes by burning people” Erasmus warned years before Heinrich Heine said that “There, were one burns books, one ends up burning people”.

Printers and friends of Erasmus, especially in France, died on the stake opening the doors for the religious wars that will ravage Europe for the century to come.

What Erasmus feared above all, is that with the Vatican’s brutal war against Luther, it is the entire cultural renaissance and the learning of languages that got threatened with extinction.

In July 1521, confronted with the book burning, the German painter and engraver Albrecht Dürer, who made his living with bible illustrations, left Antwerp with his wife to return to his native Nuremberg.

Thirty years later, in 1552, the great cartographer Gerardus Mercator, a brilliant pupil of the Collegium Trilingue, for having called into question the views of Aristotle, went into exile and settled in Duisbourg, Germany.

In 1521, at the request of his friends who feared for his life, Erasmus left Leuven for Basel and settled in the workshop of another humanist, the Swiss printer Johann Froben.

In 1530, with a foreword of Erasmus, Froben published Georgius Agricola’s inventory of mining techniques, De Re Metallica, a key book that vastly contributed to the industrial revolution of Saxen, Switzerland, Germany and the whole of Europe.

Conclusion

If certain Catholic historians try to downplay the hostility of their Church towards Erasmus, the fact remains that between 1559 and 1900, the full works of Erasmus were on the “Index Vaticanus” and therefore “forbidden readings” for Catholics.

If Thomas More, whom Erasmus considered as his twin brother, was canonized by Pius XI in 1935 and recognized as the patron saint of the political leaders, Erasmus himself was never rehabilitated.

Interrogated by this author in a letter, the Pope Francis returned a polite but evasive answer.

Let’s rebuild the Collegium Trilingue !

With the exception of the staircase, only a few stones remain of the historical building housing the Collegium Trilingue. In 1909, the University of Louvain planned to buy up and rebuild the site but the First World War changed priorities. Before becoming social housing, part of the building was used as a factory. As a result, today, there is no overwhelming charm. However, seeing the historical value of the site, we cannot but fully support a full reconstruction plan of the building and its immediate environment.

It would make the historical center of Leuven so much nicer, so much more attractive and very much more loyal to its own history. On top, such a reconstruction wouldn’t cost much and might interest private investors. The images in 3 dimensions produced for the Leuven exhibit show a nice Flemish Renaissance building, much in the style of the marvels constructed by architect Rombout II Keldermans.

Every period has the right to honestly “re-write” its own history, without falsifications, according to its own vision of the future.

It has to be noted here that the world famous “Rubenshuis” in Antwerp, is not at all the original building, but a scrupulous reconstruction of the late 1930s.

Merci de partager !

Le combat républicain de David d’Angers, statue de Gutenberg à Strasbourg

En plein centre-ville de Strasbourg, à deux pas de la cathédrale, tournant le dos à la Chambre de commerce qui date de 1585, la belle statue en bronze représentant l’imprimeur allemand Johannes Gutenberg tenant une page à peine imprimée de sa Bible sur laquelle on peut lire : « Et la lumière fut ! » (NOTE 1)

Évoquant l’émancipation des peuples grâce à la diffusion de la connaissance par le développement de l’imprimerie, la statue, érigée en 1840, arrive à un moment où les partisans de la République sont vent debout contre la censure de la presse imposée par Louis-Philippe sous la Monarchie de Juillet.

Strasbourg, Mayence et la Chine

Modèle en plâtre pour la statue de Gutenberg, par David d’Angers.

Né vers 1400 à Mayence, Johannes Gutenberg, avec l’argent que lui prête le marchand et banquier Johann Fust, réalise à Strasbourg, entre 1434 et 1445, ses premiers essais avec des caractères d’imprimerie mobiles en métal, avant de perfectionner son procédé à Mayence, notamment en imprimant à partir de 1452 sa fameuse Bible dite à 42 lignes.

A sa mort (à Mayence) en 1468, Gutenberg lègue son procédé à l’humanité permettant l’envol de l’imprimerie en Europe. Des chroniqueurs évoquent également le travail de Laurens Janszoon Coster à Harlem ou encore ceux de l’imprimeur italien Panfilo Castaldi qui aurait ramené le savoir-faire chinois en Europe. Soulignons que le monde « civilisé » d’alors refusait de reconnaître que l’imprimerie avait vu le jour en Asie avec les fameux « caractères mobiles » (en porcelaine et en métal) mis au point plusieurs siècles plus tôt en Chine et en Corée. (NOTE 2)

En Europe, Mayence et Strasbourg se disputent la place d’honneur. Ainsi, pour célébrer le 400e anniversaire de « l’invention » de l’imprimerie, Mayence inaugure, le 14 août 1837, sa statue de Gutenberg érigée par le sculpteur Bertel Thorvaldsenalors, alors qu’à Strasbourg, dès 1835, un comité local avait confié la réalisation d’un monument du même type au sculpteur David d’Angers.

Ce dernier, assez peu connu, fut aussi bien un grand sculpteur ami proche de Victor Hugo, qu’un républicain fervent en contact personnel avec la fine fleur de l’élite humaniste de son époque en France, en Allemagne et aux Etats-Unis. Il fut également un combattant inlassable de l’abolition de la traite négrière et de l’esclavage.

La vie du sculpteur

Sculpteur français Pierre-Jean David, dit « David d’Angers » (1788-1856) est le fils du maître sculpteur Pierre Louis David. Pierre-Jean sera marqué par l’esprit républicain de son père qui le forme à la sculpture dès son jeune âge. A douze ans, son père l’inscrit au cours de dessin de l’École centrale de Nantes. A Paris, il est sollicité pour réaliser les ornementations de l’Arc de Triomphe du Carrousel et la façade sud du palais du Louvre. Enfin il entre aux Beaux-arts.

David d’Angers, par François-Joseph Heim, Musée du Louvre.

David d’Angers possède un sens aigu de l’interprétation de la figure humaine et une aptitude à pénétrer les secrets de ses modèles. Il excelle dans le portrait que ce soit en buste ou en médaillon. Il est l’auteur d’au moins soixante huit statues et statuettes, d’une cinquantaine de bas-reliefs, d’une centaine de bustes et plus de cinq cents médaillons. Victor Hugo avait dit à son ami David: « C’est la monnaie de bronze avec laquelle vous payez votre péage à la postérité. »

Il voyage en Europe : Berlin, Londres, Dresde, Munich où partout, il exécute des bustes.

Vers 1825, alors qu’il obtient la commande du monument funéraire que la Nation élève par souscription publique en l’honneur du général Foy, un tribun de l’opposition parlementaire, une mutation idéologique et artistique s’opère en lui. Il fréquente les milieux progressistes des intellectuels de la « génération de 1820 » et rejoint le courant républicain international. Il s’interroge alors sur les problèmes politiques et sociaux de la France et de l’Europe. Plus tard, il resta toujours fidèle à ses convictions, refusant par exemple la commande prestigieuse du tombeau de Napoléon.

Production artistique

Projet de statue du médecin Françis-Xavier Bichat (1771-1802), David d’Angers.

Son art s’infléchit donc dans le sens d’un naturalisme dont l’iconographie et l’expression détonnent si on le compare à l’art que pratiquent ses collègues académiciens et à celui des sculpteurs dissidents dits alors « romantiques ». Pour David, point de sensualisme mythologique, d’allégories obscures ni de pittoresque historique. La sculpture, selon David, doit au contraire généraliser et transposer ce que l’artiste observe, de façon à assurer la survie des idées et des destinées dans une postérité intemporelle. David s’attacha à cette conception particulière, limitée de la sculpture, adoptant ainsi les réflexions de l’âge des Lumières selon lesquelles cet art se fait « le dépôt durable des vertus des hommes » en perpétuant le souvenir des exploits des êtres d’exception.

Médaillon figurant Alexandre de Humboldt, David d’Angers.

Prévaut alors l’image, un peu austère, des « grands hommes » que l’on connaît surtout grâce à quelque 600 médaillons représentant les hommes et femmes célèbres, de plusieurs pays, la plupart étant ses contemporains. A cela, s’ajoute une centaine de bustes, avant tout représentant ses amis, des poètes, des écrivains, des musiciens, des chansonniers, des scientifiques et des hommes politiques avec lesquels il partage l’idéal républicain.

Parmi les plus éclairés de son époque, on compte : Victor Hugo, Lafayette, Wolfgang Goethe, Alfred de Vigny, Alphonse Lamartine, Pierre-Jean de Béranger, Alfred de Musset, François Arago, Alexandre de Humboldt, Honoré de Balzac, Lady Morgan, James Fennimore Cooper, Armand Carrel, François Chateaubriand, Ennius Quirinus Visconti et autres Niccolo Paganini.

Pour magnifier ses modèles et rendre visuellement les qualités du génie propre à chacun, David d’Angers invente un mode d’idéalisation non plus fondé sur le classicisme à l’antique, mais sur une grammaire des formes issue d’une science nouvelle, la phrénologie du Docteur Gall, qui voulait que les « bosses » crâniennes d’un individu traduisent ses aptitudes intellectuelles et ses passions. Pour le sculpteur il s’agissait de transcender la physionomie du modèle pour que la grandeur de l’âme rayonne à son front.

En 1826, il est élu membre de l’Institut de France et, la même année, professeur aux Beaux-Arts. En 1828, David d’Angers est victime d’un premier attentat jamais élucidé. Blessé à la tête, il est obligé de garder le lit pendant trois mois. Ce qui ne l’empêche pas, en 1830, toujours fidèle aux idées républicaines, de participer aux journées révolutionnaires et combats sur les barricades. Fronton du Panthéon, David d’Angers.

Le sculpteur se trouva ainsi tout désigné, en 1830, pour exécuter la commande du programme de sculpture politique le plus chargé de sens de la monarchie de Juillet et, peut-être, du XIXe siècle en France, la nouvelle décoration du fronton de l’église Sainte-Geneviève reconvertie, dès juillet, en Panthéon.

Il s’agit pour lui, historiographe, de représenter les civils et hommes de guerre qui édifièrent la France républicaine. L’exécution des personnages qu’il avait choisis et disposés dans une esquisse d’abord approuvée puis suspendue, devait nécessairement conduire, en 1837, à un conflit avec le haut-clergé et le gouvernement. À gauche, nous voyons Bichat, Voltaire et Jean-Jacques Rousseau, David, Cuvier, Lafayette, Manuel, Carnot, Berthollet, Laplace, Malesherbes, Mirabeau, Monge et Fénelon. Alors que le gouvernement tente de faire supprimer l’effigie de Lafayette, ce que David d’Angers refuse avec obstination, appuyé en cela par la presse libérale, le fronton est dévoilé sans cérémonie officielle en septembre 1837, sans la présence de l’artiste, non invité.

Entrée en politique

Lors de la Révolution de 1848, il est nommé maire du XIe arrondissement de Paris, entre à l’Assemblée nationale constituante puis à l’Assemblée nationale législative où il vote avec la Montagne (gauche révolutionnaire). Il défend l’existence de l’Ecole des Beaux-arts et de l’Académie de France à Rome. Il s’oppose à la destruction de la Chapelle Expiatoire et au retrait de deux statues de l’Arc de Triomphe, (Résistance et Paix d’Antoine Etex).

Il vote aussi contre les poursuites à l’encontre de Louis Blanc (autre homme d’Etat républicain condamné à l’exil), contre les crédits de l’expédition romaine de Napoléon III, pour l’abolition de la peine de mort, pour le droit au travail, pour l’amnistie générale.

Exil

Jeune fille grecque, statue de David d’Angers pour le tombeau de Markos Botzaris.

Il n’est pas réélu député en 1849 et se retire de la vie politique. En 1851, à l’avènement de Napoléon III, David d’Angers est arrêté et également condamné à l’exil. Il choisit la Belgique puis voyage en Grèce (son vieux projet). Il veut revoir sa Jeune grecque sur le tombeau du républicain patriote grec Markos Botzaris, qu’il trouve mutilée et à l’abandon (il la fera rapatrier en France et restaurer).

Déçu par la Grèce, il revient en France, en 1852. Aidé par son ami de Béranger, il est autorisé à séjourner à Paris où il reprend ses travaux. En septembre 1855, il est terrassé par une attaque d’apoplexie qui l’oblige à cesser ses activités. Il décède en janvier 1856.

Amitiés avec Lafayette, l’abbé Grégoire et Pierre-Jean de Béranger

Le marquis de Lafayette. peint par Adolphe Phalipon d’après un tableau d’Ary Scheffer (1795-1858).

David d’Angers apparaît comme un véritable trait-d’union entre les républicains du XVIII et ceux du XIXe siècle et une passerelle vivante entre ceux d’Europe et d’Amérique.

Né en 1788, il aura la chance de fréquenter dans son jeune âge certaines grandes figures révolutionnaires de l’époque avant de s’impliquer personnellement dans les révolutions de 1830 et 1848.

Vers la fin des années 1820, David participe aux réunions chaque mardi du salon de Madame de Lafayette épouse de Gilbert du Motier, marquis de La Fayette (1757-1834).

Alors que le général Lafayette s’y tenait droit comme « un chêne vénérable », ce salon, note le sculpteur,

« a une physionomie bien tranchée, écrit-il. Là les hommes causent de choses sérieuses, surtout politiques, les jeunes gens mêmes ont l’air grave : il y a quelque chose de décidé, d’énergique et de courageux dans leur regard et dans leur maintien (…) Toutes les dames et aussi les demoiselles ont l’air calme et réfléchi ; elles ont plutôt l’air d’être venues pour voir ou assister à des délibérations importantes, que pour se faire voir. »

Le général républicain irlandais Arthur O’Connor.

David y rencontre un compagnon d’armes de Lafayette, le général Arthur O’Connor (1763-1852), ancien député irlandais acquis à la cause républicaine ayant rejoint les volontaires de l’Etat-Major de Lafayette en 1792.

Accusé d’avoir suscité des troubles contre l’Empire britannique et en contact avec le général Lazare Hoche, O’Connor se réfugia en France en 1796 et participa à l’expédition d’Irlande. O’Connor, épousa en 1807 la fille de Condorcet et sera naturalisé Français en 1818.

Le chansonnier républicain Pierre-Jean de Béranger, buste de David d’Angers.

Lafayette et David d’Angers se retrouvaient souvent avec un petit groupe d’amis, quelques « frères », membres de loges maçonniques : tels le chansonnier Pierre-Jean de Béranger, François Chateaubriand, Benjamin Constant, Alexandre Dumas (qui correspondait avec Edgar Allan Poe), Alphonse Lamartine, Henri Beyle dit Stendhal ou encore les peintres François Gérard et Horace Vernet.

Dans ces mêmes cercles, David fera également connaissance avec l’Abbé Grégoire (1750-1831) et on y évoquait souvent le problème de l’abolition de l’esclavage que Grégoire avait fait voter le 4 février 1794.

Dans leurs échanges, Lafayette aimait rappeler ce que disait son ami de jeunesse Nicolas de Condorcet :

« L’esclavage, c’est une horrible barbarie, si nous ne pouvons manger du sucre qu’à ce prix, il faut savoir renoncer à une denrée souillée du sang de nos frères.« 

Pour Grégoire, le problème était bien plus profond :

« Tant que les hommes seront altérés de sang, ou plutôt, tant que la plupart des gouvernements n’auront pas de morale, que la politique sera l’art de fourber, que les peuples, méconnaissant leurs vrais intérêts, attacheront une sotte importance au métier de spadassin, et se laisseront conduire aveuglément à la boucherie avec une résignation moutonnière, presque toujours pour servir de piédestal à la vanité, presque jamais pour venger les droits de l’humanité, et faire un pas vers le bonheur et la vertu, la nation la plus florissante sera celle qui aura plus de facilité pour égorger les autres.« 

(Essai sur la régénération physique, morale et politique des juifs)

Napoléon et l’esclavage

La première abolition de l’esclavage avait été, hélas de courte durée. En 1802, Napoléon Bonaparte, à court d’argent pour financer ses guerres, rétablit l’esclavage et neuf jours plus tard, il exclut de l’armée française les officiers de couleur. Enfin, il proscrit les mariages entre « fiancés dont la couleur de peau est différente ». David d’Angers restait très sensible à cette question, ayant comme camarade, un tout jeune écrivain, Alexandre Dumas, dont le père était né esclave à Haïti.

Dès 1781, sous le pseudonyme de Schwarz (noir en Allemand), Nicolas de Condorcet avait fait paraître un manifeste plaidant pour la disparition graduelle de l’esclavage sur une période de 60 à70 ans, un point de vue rapidement partagé par Lafayette. Fervent militant de la cause abolitionniste, Condorcet condamne l’esclavage comme un crime mais dénonce aussi son inutilité économique : le travail servile, dont la productivité est faible, est un frein à l’établissement de l’économie de marché.

Et avant même la signature du traité de paix entre la France et les Etats-Unis, Lafayette écrivit à son ami George Washington le 3 février 1783 pour lui proposer de s’associer à lui afin de mettre en route un processus d’émancipation progressif des esclaves. Il lui suggérait un plan qui « deviendrait franchement bénéfique pour la portion noire de l’humanité ».

Il s’agissait d’acheter un petit État dans lequel on ferait l’expérience de libérer les esclaves et de les faire travailler comme fermiers. Un tel exemple, expliquait-il, « pourrait faire école et ainsi devenir une pratique générale ».  (NOTE 3)

Washington lui répond qu’à titre personnel il aurait plutôt envie d’appuyer une telle démarche mais que le Congrès américain (déjà) y était totalement hostile.

De la Société des amis des Noirs à la Société française pour l’abolition de l’esclavage

L’abbé Henri Grégoire, buste de David d’Angers.

A Paris, l’abbé Grégoire et Jacques Pierre Brissot créent le 19 février 1788 « La Société des amis des Noirs » dont le règlement fut rédigé par Condorcet et dont les époux Lafayette furent également membres.

La société avait pour but l’égalité des Blancs et des Noirs libres dans les colonies, l’interdiction immédiate de la traite des Noirs et progressive de l’esclavage ; d’une part dans le souci de maintenir l’économie des colonies françaises, et d’autre part dans l’idée qu’avant d’accéder à la liberté, les Noirs devaient y être préparés, et donc éduqués.

Après la quasi disparition des « Amis des Noirs », l’offensive fut renouvelée avec d’abord, en 1821, la fondation de la « Société de la morale chrétienne » constituant en 1822 un « Comité pour l’abolition de la traite des Noirs », dont une partie des membres ira fonder en 1834 la « Société française pour l’abolition de l’esclavage (SFAE) ».

D’abord favorable à une abolition progressive, la SFAE sera ensuite favorable à une abolition immédiate. Interdit de réunion, elle décide de créer des comités abolitionnistes dans l’ensemble du pays pour que ceux-ci relaient tant au plan local qu’au plan national la volonté de faire cesser l’esclavage.

Goethe et Schiller

À l’été 1829, David d’Angers effectue son premier voyage en Allemagne et rencontre Goethe (1749-1832), le poète et philosophe qui s’était retiré à Weimar. Plusieurs séances de pose ont permis au sculpteur de réaliser son portrait.

Victor Pavie.

L’écrivain et poète Victor Pavie (1808-1886), ami de Victor Hugo et un des fondateurs des « Cercles catholiques ouvriers », nous relate un épisode pittoresque du sculpteur dans son « Goethe et David, souvenirs d’un voyage à Weimar » (1874).

En 1827, le journal français Globe avait fait paraître deux lettres racontant deux visites rendues à Goethe, en 1817 et 1825, par Victor Cousin (1792-1887), ainsi qu’un courrier d’André-Marie Ampère (1775-1867), de retour de l’« Athènes de l’Allemagne ». Le tout jeune savant y faisait part de son admiration, et donnait de nombreux détails qui aiguisèrent l’intérêt de ses compatriotes. Lors de son séjour à Weimar, Ampère compléta les connaissances de son hôte au sujet des auteurs romantiques, et notamment en ce qui concerne Mérimée, Vigny, Deschamps et Delphine Gay. Goethe avait déjà une opinion (positive) sur Victor Hugo, Lamartine et Casimir Delavigne, et sur tout ce qu’ils devaient à Chateaubriand.

Abonné au Globe depuis sa fondation en 1824 Goethe disposait d’un merveilleux instrument d’information française. En tous cas, il ne lui restait pas grand chose à apprendre sur la France, quand David et Pavie se présentèrent chez lui, au mois d’août 1829. Fort de son expérience malheureuse avec Walter Scott à Londres, David d’Angers avait, cette fois, pris ses précautions, se munissant d’un certain nombre de lettres de recommandation pour les habitants de Weimar, ainsi que de deux lettres d’introduction auprès de Goethe, signées par l’abbé Grégoire et Victor Cousin. Afin de montrer à l’illustre écrivain ce qu’il savait faire, il avait mis dans une caisse quelques uns de ses plus beaux médaillons.

Arrivés à Weimar, David d’Angers et Victor Pavie rencontreront de grandes difficultés dans leur quête, d’autant que les destinataires des lettres de recommandation étaient tous absents. Frappé de désespoir, craignant l’échec, David accuse alors son jeune ami Victor Pavie :

Friedrich Schiller, médaillon de David d’Angers.

c« Oui, tu t’es lancé avec ton optimisme de jeune homme sans me laisser le temps de réfléchir et de me dégager. Ce n’est point en poltron et sous le patronage interlope d’un aventurier, c’est de front et résolument qu’il nous fallait aborder le personnage. (…) On vaut par ce qu’on est, c’est oui ou non. Tu me connais, à genoux devant le génie, et, devant le pouvoir, imployable.
Ah ! les poètes de cour, grands ou petits, partout les mêmes ! 

(…) Et d’un bond s’élançant de la chaise où il s’était insensiblement laissé choir : Où est Schiller (1759-1805) que je l’embrasse ! Celui-là était peuple, on ne disait point Monsieur de Schiller ; sa tombe, où je frapperai, ne me restera point scellée ; j’irai l’y prendre, et l’en ramènerai glorieux. Je ne l’ai point vu, qu’importe ? ai-je vu Corneille, ai-je vu Racine ? Le buste que je lui destine n’en ressemblera que mieux ; sur son front reluira l’éclair de son génie. Je le ferai tel que je l’aime et l’admire, non point avec ce nez pincé dont l’a gratifié Dannecker, mais les narines gonflées de patriotisme et de liberté ».

Le récit de Victor Pavie révèle la ferveur républicaine animant le sculpteur qui, fidèle aux idéaux de l’abbé Grégoire, réfléchissait déjà à la grande sculpture contre l’esclavage qu’il projetait de réaliser :

« En ce moment, la fenêtre entrebâillée de notre chambre, cédant à la brise du soir, s’ouvrit à deux battants. Le ciel était superbe ; la voie lactée s’y déroulait avec un tel éclat qu’on en eût compté les étoiles. Il (David) resta quelque temps silencieux, ébloui ; puis, avec cette soudaineté d’impression qui renouvelait incessamment autour de lui le domaine des sentiments et des idées : ‘Quelle œuvre, et quel chef-d’œuvre ! Sommes-nous pauvres près de cela ! Tous vos génies en un, écrivains, artistes, poètes, atteindraient-ils jamais à ce poème incomparable dont les tâches sont des splendeurs ? Dieu sait pourtant vos prétentions insatiables ; on vous écorche en vous louant… Et légers ! Retiens bien ceci (et ses pressentiments à cet égard n’étaient rien moins qu’une chimère), c’est que tel d’entre eux qui a reçu de moi pour gage de mon admiration un buste en marbre, en aura quelque jour littéralement perdu le souvenir. – Non, il n’y a rien de noble et de grand dans l’humanité que ce qui souffre. J’ai toujours dans la tête, ou plutôt dans le cœur, cette protestation de la conscience humaine contre la plus exécrable iniquité de nos temps, la traite des nègres : après dix ans de silence et de souffrance il faut qu’elle éclate par la voix de l’airain. Tu vois d’ici le groupe : l’esclave garrotté, l’œil au ciel protecteur et vengeur du faible ; près de lui, gisante et brisée, sa femme, au sein de laquelle une frêle créature suce du sang au lieu de lait ; à leurs pieds, détaché du collier rompu de la négresse, le crucifix, l’Homme-Dieu mort pour ses frères, noirs ou blancs. Oui, le monument sera de bronze, et quand soufflera le vent, l’on entendra battre la chaîne, et les anneaux résonneront’ ».

Enfin, Goethe finit par rencontrer les deux Français et David d’Angers réussit à faire son buste. Victor Pavie : « Goethe s’inclina avec politesse devant nous, attaqua dès l’abord le français avec aisance, et nous fit asseoir de cet air calme et résigné qui m’étonnait, comme si c’était une chose toute simple de se trouver debout à quatre-vingts ans, face à face avec une troisième génération, à laquelle il se trouve transmis à travers la seconde, ainsi qu’une vivante tradition. 

« (…) David portait sur lui, comme l’on dit vulgairement, un échantillon de son savoir-faire. Il présenta au vieillard quelques uns de ses profils vivants, d’une expression si morale, d’une exécution si nerveuse et si intime, fragment d’un grand tout qui va se complétant avec notre âge, et qui réserve aux siècles d’après la physionomie monumentale du XIX
e. Goethe les prit dans sa main, les considéra muet, avec une scrupuleuse attention, comme pour en soutirer une harmonie cachée, et fit entendre une exclamation sourde et équivoque que je reconnus plus tard pour une marque de satisfaction authentique. Puis à ce propos, par une transition plus intelligible et bien flatteuse, dont il ne se douta peut-être pas, marchant à sa bibliothèque, il nous étala avec charme une riche collection de médailles du moyen âge, rares et précieuses reliques d’un art que l’on pourrait dire perdu, et dont notre grand sculpteur David a su de nos jours retrouver et retremper le secret.

« (…) Le projet de buste n’eut pas à languir longtemps : et dès le lendemain un des appartements de l’immense maison du poète était transformé en atelier, et un tertre informe gisait sur le parquet, attendant le premier souffle de l’existence. Sitôt qu’il se fut remué lentement vers une apparence humaine, on vit se mouvoir en même temps la figure jusque-là calme et impassible de Goethe. Peu-à-peu, comme s’il se fut déterminé une secrète et sympathique alliance entre le portrait et le modèle, à mesure que l’un s’acheminait à la vie, l’autre s’épanouissait à la confiance et à l’abandon : on en vint bientôt à ces confidences d’artiste, à ce confluent de poésie, où réunies de part et d’autre, les idées du poète et du sculpteur se précipitent dans un moule commun. Il allait, venait, rôdant autour de cette masse croissante, (pour me servir d’une comparaison triviale) avec l’inquiète sollicitude d’un propriétaire qui fait bâtir. Il nous adressait de nombreuses questions sur la France dont il suivait la marche avec une jeune et active curiosité ; et s’ébattant à loisir sur la littérature moderne, il passait tour-à-tour en revue Chateaubriand, Lamartine, Nodier, Alfred de Vigny, Victor Hugo, dont il avait médité sérieusement la manière dans Cromwell.

« (…) Le buste de David sera beau comme celui de Chateaubriand, de Lamartine, de Cooper, comme toute application de génie à génie, comme l’œuvre d’un ciseau apte et puissant à la reproduction d’un de ces types créés tout exprès par la nature pour l’habitation d’une grande pensée. De toutes les ressemblances tentées avec plus ou moins de bonheur, dans tous les âges de cette longue gloire, depuis sa jeunesse de vingt ans jusqu’au buste de Rauch, le dernier et le mieux entendu de tous, ce n’est pas une prévention de dire que celui de David est le meilleur, ou pour parler plus franchement encore, la seule réalisation de cette ressemblance idéale qui n’est pas la chose, mais qui est plus que la chose, la nature prise au-dedans et retournée au-dehors, la manifestation extérieure d’une intelligence divine passée à l’état d’écorce humaine. Et il est peu d’occasion comme celle-ci, où l’exécution colossale ne semble que l’indication impuissante d’un effet réel. Un front immense, sur lequel se dresse, comme des nuages, une épaisse touffe de cheveux argentés ; un regard de haut en bas, creux et immobile, un regard de Jupiter olympien, un nez de proportion large et de style antique, dans la ligne du front ; puis cette bouche singulière dont nous parlions tout-à-l’heure, avec la lèvre inférieure un peu avancée, cette bouche, tout examen, interrogation et finesse, complétant le haut par le bas, le génie par la raison ; sans autre piédestal que son cou musculeux, cette tête se penche comme voilée, vers la terre : c’est l’heure où le génie couchant abaisse son regard vers ce monde qu’il éclaire encore d’un rayon d’adieu. Telle est la description grossière de la statue de Goethe par David. – Quel malheur que dans son buste de Schiller, si célèbre et si prôné, le sculpteur Dannecker lui ait préparé un si misérable pendant ! »

Quand Goethe reçoit son buste, il remercie chaleureusement l’Angevin pour les échanges épistolaires, les livres et les médaillons… mais ne fait aucune mention du buste ! Pour une raison simple : il ne se reconnaît pas du tout dans l’œuvre, qu’il ne garde d’ailleurs pas chez lui… Le poète allemand est représenté avec un front démesuré, pour refléter sa grande intelligence. Et ses cheveux ébouriffés symbolisent les tourments de son âme…

David d’Angers et Hippolyte Carnot

Hippolyte Carnot, fils cadet de Lazare Carnot, peint par Jules Laure, 1837.

Parmi les fondateurs de la Société française pour l’abolition de l’esclavage (SFAE), Hippolyte Carnot (1801-1888), frère cadet de Nicolas Sadi Carnot (1796-1832), pionnier de la thermodynamique et fils de « l’organisateur de la victoire », le génie militaire et scientifique Lazare Carnot dont il va, en 1869, relater l’œuvre et le combat dans sa biographie Mémoires sur Lazare Carnot 1753-1823 par son fils Hippolyte.

Hippolyte publiera en 1888, sous le titre Henri Grégoire, évêque républicain, les Mémoires de ce défenseur de tous les opprimés d’alors (des nègres comme des juifs), grand ami de son père et qui lui avait gardé cette amitié.

Pour l’ancien évêque de Blois,

« il faut éclairer l’ignorance qui ne connait pas et la pauvreté qui n’a pas les moyens de connaitre.« 

Grégoire avait été un des grands « éducateurs de la Convention » et c’est sur son rapport que fut fondé, 29 septembre 1794, notamment, pour l’instruction des artisans, le Conservatoire des Arts-et-Métiers. Grégoire contribua également à la création du Bureau des longitudes le 25 juin 1795 et de l’Institut de France le 25 octobre 1795.

Buste de Rouget de Lisle, David d’Angers.

Hippolyte Carnot et David d’Angers publièrent ensemble les Mémoires de Bertrand Barère de Vieuzac (1755-1841) qui, au Comité de Salut Public, avait en quelque sorte le rôle de Ministre de l’Information, chargé d’annoncer à la Convention, dès leur arrivée, les victoires des Armées Républicaines.

C’est également l’abbé Grégoire qui chargea David d’Angers, avec l’aide de son ami Béranger, d’apporter en 1826 un peu de confort matériel et financier à Rouget de Lisle (1860-1836), l’auteur légendaire de La Marseillaise composée à Strasbourg, lorsque dans ses vieux jours, le compositeur croupillait en prison pour dette.

Dépassant les sectarismes de leur époque, voilà trois fervents républicains plein de compassion et de reconnaissance pour un génie musical qui n’a jamais voulu accepter de renoncer à ses convictions royalistes mais dont la création patriotique deviendra l’hymne national de la jeune République française.

Gouvernement provisoire de la IIe République

Hippolyte Carnot.

Tous ces combats, démarches et mobilisations aboutiront en 1848, lorsque, pendant deux mois et 15 jours (du 24 février au 9 mai), une poignée d’authentiques républicains firent partie du « gouvernement provisoire » de la IIe république.

En si peu de temps, que de bonnes mesures furent prises ou mises en chantier ! Hippolyte Carnot y est un ministre de l’Instruction publique déterminé à créer une éducation de haut niveau pour tous, et femmes incluses, suivant les modèles fixés par son père pour Polytechnique et de Grégoire pour les Arts et Métiers.

L’article 13 de la Constitution de 1848, « garantit aux citoyens (…) l’enseignement primaire gratuit ». Le ministre de l’Instruction publique, toujours Lazare Hippolyte Carnot, soumet à l’Assemblée le 30 juin 1848 un projet de loi qui anticipe totalement sur les lois Ferry, en prévoyant un enseignement élémentaire obligatoire pour les deux sexes, gratuit et laïc, tout en garantissant la liberté d’enseignement. Il prévoit également pour les instituteurs une formation gratuite de trois ans dans une école normale, avec en contrepartie une obligation d’enseigner pendant au moins dix ans, système qui sera longtemps en vigueur. Il propose une nette amélioration de leurs salaires. Il exhorte, déjà, les instituteurs « à dispenser un catéchisme républicain ».

Buste de David d’Angers signé « A son honorable ami François Arago ».

Membre du gouvernement provisoire, le grand astronome et scientifique François Arago est ministre des colonies, après avoir été désigné par Gaspard Monge à lui succéder à l’Ecole polytechnique pour y enseigner la géométrie projective. Son ami le plus proche n’est autre qu’Alexandre de Humboldt, ami de Johann Wolfgang Goethe et de Friedrich Schiller.

Il est un autre militant abolitionniste ayant passé une bonne partie de sa vie d’adulte à Paris. Humboldt fait partie de la Société d’Arcueil formée autour du chimiste Claude-Louis Berthollet où se rencontrent également François Arago, Jean-Baptiste Biot, Louis-Joseph Gay-Lussac avec lesquels Humboldt se lie d’amitié. Ils publient ensemble plusieurs articles scientifiques.

Humboldt et Gay-Lussac mènent des expériences communes sur la composition de l’atmosphère, sur le magnétisme terrestre et la diffraction de la lumière, recherches dont le grand Louis Pasteur cueillera par la suite les fruits.

Napoléon, qui voulait initialement expulser Humboldt, finit par tolérer sa présence. La Société de géographie de Paris, fondée en 1821, le choisit comme président.

Humboldt, Arago, Schoelcher, David d’Angers et Hugo

Humboldt ne cache pas ses idéaux républicains. Son Essai Politique sur l’Ile de Cuba (1825), a l’effet d’une bombe. Trop hostile aux pratiques esclavagistes, l’ouvrage fut interdit de publication en Espagne. Londres va jusqu’à lui refuser tout accès à son Empire.

Bien plus déplorable, John S. Trasher, qui en publia, en 1856, une version en langue anglaise, supprima carrément le chapitre consacré aux esclaves et à la traite ! Humboldt protestera énergiquement contre cette mutilation, opérée à des fins politiques. Trasher était esclavagiste, Sa traduction expurgée fut destinée à combattre les arguments des abolitionnistes nord-américains, qui par la suite publièrent le chapitre escamoté dans le New-York Herald et le Courrier des États-Unis. Victor Schoelcher et le décret abolissant l’esclavage dans les colonies françaises.

En France, sous Arago, le sous-secrétaire d’État à la Marine et aux colonies se nomme Victor Schoelcher. Il n’a pas besoin d’argumenter beaucoup pour convaincre l’astronome que toutes les planètes sont alignés pour passer à l’acte.

Franc-maçon, Schoelcher est un frère de loge de David d’Angers, « Les amis de la Vérité » aussi connu sous le nom de Cercle social, en réalité « un mélange de club politique révolutionnaire, de loge maçonnique et de salon littéraire ».

Le 4 mars une commission est mise en place pour résoudre le problème de l’esclavage dans les colonies françaises. Elle est présidée par Victor de Broglie, président de la SFAE à laquelle adhèrent cinq des douze membres de la commission. Grâce aux efforts de François Arago, Henri Wallon et surtout Victor Schoelcher, ses travaux permettent l’abolition de l’esclavage le 27 avril.

Hugo abolitionniste

Victor Hugo, buste de David d’Angers.

Victor Hugo fut un des partisans de l’abolition de l’esclavage, en France, mais aussi d’une égalité entre ce que l’on désignait encore comme « les races » au XIXe siècle. « République blanche et république noire sont sœurs, de même que l’homme noir et l’homme blanc sont frères », affirmait déjà Hugo en 1859. Pour lui, tous les hommes étant des créations de Dieu, la fraternité était de mise.

Lorsque le 27 avril 1851, une anti-esclavagiste, Maria Chapman, écrit à Hugo pour lui demander de soutenir la cause abolitionniste, Hugo lui répond : « L’esclavage aux États-Unis ! s’exclame-t-il le 12 mai, y a-t-il un contresens plus monstrueux ? ». Comment, en effet, une république dotée d’une aussi belle constitution est capable de préserver une pratique aussi barbare ?

Huit ans plus tard, le 2 décembre 1859, il écrit une lettre ouverte aux États-Unis d’Amérique, publiée par les journaux libres d’Europe, pour défendre l’abolitionniste John Brown condamné à mort.

Partant du fait qu’« il y a des esclaves dans les états du Sud, ce qui indigne, comme le plus monstrueux des contre-sens, la conscience logique et pure des états du Nord », il relate le combat de Brown, son procès et son exécution annoncée, et conclut : « il y a quelque chose de plus effrayant que Caïn tuant Abel, c’est Washington tuant Spartacus ».

Un journaliste de Port-au-Prince, Exilien Heurtelou, le remercie le 4 février 1860. Hugo lui répond le 31 mars :

« Vous êtes, monsieur, un noble échantillon de cette humanité noire si longtemps opprimée et méconnue. D’un bout à l’autre de la terre, la même flamme est dans l’homme ; et les noirs comme vous le prouvent. Y a-t-il eu plusieurs Adam ? Les naturalistes peuvent discuter la question ; mais ce qui est certain, c’est qu’il n’y a qu’un Dieu. Puisqu’il n’y a qu’un père, nous sommes frères.

C’est pour cette vérité que John Brown est mort ; c’est pour cette vérité que je lutte. Vous m’en remerciez, et je ne saurais vous dire combien vos belles paroles me touchent. Il n’y a sur la terre ni blancs ni noirs, il y a des esprits ; vous en êtes un. Devant Dieu, toutes les âmes sont blanches.

J’aime votre pays, votre race, votre liberté, votre révolution, votre république. Votre île magnifique et douce plaît à cette heure aux âmes libres ; elle vient de donner un grand exemple ; elle a brisé le despotisme.
Elle nous aidera à briser l’esclavage. »

En 1860 également, la Société abolitionniste américaine, mobilisée derrière Lincoln publiera un recueil de discours. La brochure s’ouvre sur trois textes de Hugo, suivis par ceux de Carnot, Humboldt et Lafayette.

Hugo accepte de présider, le 18 mai 1879, une commémoration de l’abolition de l’esclavage en présence de Victor Schoelcher, auteur principal du décret d’émancipation de 1848, qui salue en Hugo « le défenseur puissant de tous les déshérités, de tous les faibles, de tous les opprimés de ce monde » et déclare ceci :

« La cause des nègres que nous soutenons, et envers lesquels les nations chrétiennes ont tant à se reprocher, devait avoir votre sympathie ; nous vous sommes reconnaissants de l’attester par votre présence au milieu de nous.« 

Un début de mieux

Autre mesure prise par le gouvernement provisoire de cette éphémère IIe République : l’abolition de la peine de mort dans le domaine politique et la suppression, le 12 mars, des châtiments corporels, tout comme la contrainte par corps (prison pour dette) le 19 mars.

Dans le domaine politique, la liberté de la presse et celle de réunion sont proclamées le 4 mars. Le 5 mars le gouvernement institue le suffrage universel masculin, en remplacement du suffrage censitaire en vigueur depuis 1815. D’un coup le corps électoral passe de 250 000 à 9 millions d’électeurs. Cette mesure démocratique place le monde rural, qui regroupe les trois quarts des habitants, au cœur de la vie politique, et ce, pour de nombreuses décennies. Cette masse de nouveaux électeurs, faute de véritable formation citoyenne, voyant en lui un protecteur, plébiscitera en masse Napoléon III, aussi bien en 1851, en 1860 qu’en 1870.

Victor Hugo

Deuxième buste de Victor Hugo, par David d’Angers.

Pour revenir à David d’Angers, une amitié durable l’unit à Victor Hugo (1802-1885). Fraîchement mariés, Hugo et David se retrouvaient pour dessiner. Le poète et le sculpteur aimaient dessiner ensemble, faire des caricatures, peindre des paysages ou des « architectures » qui les inspiraient.

Un même idéal les unissait et avec l’arrivée de Napoléon III, les deux hommes connurent l’exil politique.

Par amitié, David d’Angers a fait plusieurs bustes de son ami. Hugo est représenté portant un costume élégant contemporain.

Son large front et ses sourcils légèrement froncés expriment la grandeur, encore à venir, du poète. Renonçant à détailler les pupilles, David confère à ce regard une dimension intérieure et pensive qui fit écrire à Hugo :

« Mon ami, c’est l’immortalité que vous m’envoyez.« 

En 1842, David d’Angers réalise un autre buste de Victor Hugo, couronné de laurier, où cette fois ce n’est pas Hugo l’ami intime qui est évoqué mais davantage le génie et le grand homme.

Enfin, pour les funérailles de Hugo, en 1885, la République d’Haïti tint à manifester au poète sa reconnaissance en se faisant représenter par une délégation. Emmanuel-Edouard, écrivain haïtien, la présidait et déclara notamment au Panthéon :

« La République d’Haïti a le droit de parler au nom de la race noire ; la race noire, par mon organe, remercie Victor Hugo de l’avoir beaucoup aimée et honorée, de l’avoir raffermie et consolée.« 

Les quatre bas-reliefs de la statue de Gutenberg

Visite-conférence de la statue de Gutenberg par l’auteur, le 8 juillet 2023.

Une fois que le lecteur identifie ce « grand arche » qui traverse l’histoire et, les idées et convictions, qui animaient David d’Angers, il saisira la belle unité qui sous-tend les quatre bas-reliefs du socle de la statue commémorant Gutenberg à Strasbourg.

Ce qui ressort c’est l’idée très optimiste que le genre humain, dans sa grande et magnifique diversité, est un et fraternel . Une fois libéré de toutes les formes d’oppressions (l’ignorance, esclavage, etc.), il peut vivre ensemble dans la paix et l’harmonie.

Ces bas-reliefs en bronze ont été ajoutés en 1844. Après d’âpres débats et contestations, , ils ont remplacé les modèles en plâtre peints originaux de 1840 apposés lors de l’inauguration. Ils représentent les bienfaits de l’imprimerie en Amérique, en Afrique, en Asie et en Europe. Au centre de chaque relief, une presse d’imprimerie entourée de personnages identifiés par des inscriptions ainsi que des instituteurs, des enseignants et des enfants.

Pour conclure, voici un extrait du compte-rendu de l’inauguration décrivant les bas-reliefs. Sans tomber dans le wokisme (pour qui toute idée de « grand homme » est forcément à combattre), soulignons qu’il est écrit dans les termes de l’époque et donc sujet à discussion :

Diffusion des idées en Europe grâce à l’imprimerie. Modèle en plâtre pour le socle de la statue de Gutenberg, David d’Angers.

L’EUROPE

« L’Europe est représentée par un bas-relief sur lequel se côtoient René Descartes dans une attitude méditative, placé sous Francis Bacon et Herman Boerhaave. A gauche, l’on voit successivement William Shakespeare, Pierre Corneille, Molière et Racine. Un rang en dessous se succèdent Voltaire, Buffon,Albrecht Dürer, John Milton et Cimarosa, Poussin, Calderone, Camoëns et Puget. A droite du tableau, se pressent Martin Luther, Wilhelm Gottfried Leibniz, Emmanuel Kant, Copernic, Wolfgang Goethe, Friedrich Schiller, Hegel, Richter, Klopstock. Rejetés sur le coté Linné et Ambroise Parée. Près de la presse, on peut voir au-dessus de la figure de Martin Luther, Erasme de Rotterdam, Rousseau et Lessing. Sous le gradin se voient Volta, Galilée, Isaac Newton, James Watt, Denis Papin et Raphaël. Un petit groupe d’enfants étudient parmi lesquels un Africain et un Asiatique « .

Diffusion des idées en Asie grâce à l’imprimerie. Modèle en plâtre pour le socle de la statue de Gutenberg, David d’Angers.

L’ASIE

« Une presse est de nouveau représentée à côté de laquelle William Jones et Abraham Hyacinthe Anquetil-Duperron offrent des livres aux brahmanes qui leur donnent en retour des manuscrits. Près de Jones, le sultan Mahmoud II est en train de lire le Moniteur revêtu de vêtements modernes, son ancien turban gît à ses pieds et tout près un Turc lit un livre. Un degré en dessous un empereur chinois entouré d’un Persan et d’un Chinois lit le livre de Confucius. Un Européen instruit des enfants tandis qu’un groupe de femmes indiennes se tient près d’une idole et du philosophe indien Rammonhun-Roy. « 

Diffusion des idées en Afrique grâce à l’imprimerie. Modèle en plâtre pour le socle de la statue de Gutenberg, David d’Angers.

L’AFRIQUE

« Appuyé sur une presse, William Wilberforce étreint un Africain possédant un livre, alors que des Européens distribuent à d’autres Africains des livres et s’occupent à instruire les enfants. A droite, on peut voir Thomas Clarkson brisant les fers d’un esclave. Derrière lui, l’abbé Grégoire aide un noir à se relever et tient sa main sur son cœur. Un groupe de femmes élève leurs enfants retrouvés vers les ciel, qui ne verra désormais plus que des hommes libres, tandis qu’à terre gisent des fouets et des fers brisés. C’est la fin de l’esclavage.  »

Diffusion des idées en Amérique grâce à l’imprimerie. Modèle en plâtre pour le socle de la statue de Gutenberg, David d’Angers.

L’AMERIQUE

« L’acte de l’indépendance des Etats-Unis qui a fraîchement été tiré de sous la presse figure dans les mains de Benjamin Franklin. Près de lui se tiennent Washington et Lafayette qui tient sur sa poitrine l’épée que lui donne sa patrie adoptive. Jefferson et tous les signataires de l’acte d’indépendance sont rassemblés. A droite, Bolivar serre la main d’un Indien. « 

L’Amérique

1884, chantier de la statue de la Liberté, rue de Chazelles, Paris XVIIe.

L’on comprend mieux les paroles prononcées par Victor Hugo, le 29 novembre 1884, c’est-à-dire peu avant sa mort, lors de sa visite de l’atelier du sculpteur Frédéric-Auguste Bartholdi où le poète est invité à admirer la statue géante portant le nom symbolique « La Liberté éclairant le monde », fabriquée avec le concours de Gustave Eiffel et prête à partir aux Etats-Unis par bateau. Don de la France à l’Amérique, elle consacrera le souvenir de la part active que le pays de Lafayette a prise pendant la guerre d’Indépendance.

Initialement, Hugo s’est surtout intéressé aux héros et grands hommes d’Etat américains : William Penn, Benjamin Franklin, John Brown ou encore Abraham Lincoln. Des modèles, selon Hugo qui permettaient au peuple de progresser. Aussi l’Amérique est-elle, pour l’homme politique français devenu républicain en 1847, l’exemple à suivre. Même s’il est très déçu par la position des américains sur la peine de mort et l’esclavage.

Après 1830, l’écrivain abandonne cette vision un peu idyllique du Nouveau Monde et s’en prend aux « civilisateurs » blancs, pourchasseurs d’indiens :

« Vous croyez civiliser un monde, lorsque vous l’enfiévrez de quelque fièvre immonde [4], quand vous troublez ses lacs, miroirs d’un dieu secret, lorsque vous violez sa vierge, la forêt. Quand vous chassez du bois, de l’antre, du rivage, votre frère naïf et sombre, le sauvage… Et quand jetant dehors cet Adam inutile, vous peuplez le désert d’un homme plus reptile… Idolâtre du dieu dollar, fou qui palpite, non plus pour un soleil, mais pour une pépite, qui se dit libre et montre au monde épouvanté l’esclavage étonné servant la liberté ! « 

(NOTE 5)

Surmontant sa fatigue, devant la statue de la Liberté, Hugo improvise ce qu’il sait être sa dernière allocution :

« Cette belle œuvre tend à ce que j’ai toujours aimé, appelé : la paix entre l’Amérique et la France – La France qui est l’Europe – Ce gage de paix demeurera permanent. Il était bon que cela fût fait ! « 


NOTES:

  1. Si la phrase figure dans le livre de la Genèse, il pourrait également se référer à Notre-Dame de Paris (1831) un roman de Victor Hugo, grand ami du sculpteur de la statue, David d’Angers. On sait par une lettre d’Hugo d’août 1832 que le poète porta à David d’Angers la huitième édition du livre. La scène la plus directement incarnée dans la statue est celle durant laquelle le personnage de Frollo converse avec deux érudits (l’un étant Louis XI déguisé) tout en désignant d’un doigt un livre et de l’autre la cathédrale en remarquant : « Ceci tuera cela », c’est-à-dire qu’un pouvoir (la presse imprimée), la démocratie, supplantera l’autre (l’Église), la théocratie, une évolution historique qu’Hugo pensait inéluctable.
  2. C’est la rencontre avec l’Asie qui va amener en Europe d’innombrables savoirs-faire techniques et découvertes scientifiques d’Orient, les plus connus étant la boussole et la poudre à canons. Tout aussi essentiel pour l’imprimerie que les caractères mobiles, le papier dont la fabrication fut mis au point en Chine à la fin de la Dynastie des Han de l’Est (vers l’année 185). Quant à l’imprimerie, à ce jour, le plus vieux livre imprimé que nous possédons est le Sûtra du Diamant, un écrit bouddhique chinois datant de 868. Enfin, c’est au milieu du XIe siècle, sous la dynastie des Song, que Bi Sheng (990-1051) inventa les caractères mobiles. Gravés dans de la porcelaine, céramique d’argile visqueuse, durcis dans le feu et assemblés dans la résine, ils révolutionnent l’imprimerie. Comme le documente le musée Gutenberg de Mayence, c’est le Coréen Choe Yun-ui (1102-1162) qui va améliorer cette technique au XIIe siècle en utilisant du métal (moins fragile), procédé que reprendra Gutenberg et ses associés. L’Anthologie des enseignements zen des grands prêtres bouddhistes (1377), également connue sous le nom de Jikji, a été imprimée en Corée, 78 ans avant la Bible de Gutenberg, et est reconnue comme le plus ancien livre à caractères métalliques mobiles existant au monde.
  3. Etienne Taillemite, Lafayette et l’abolition de l’esclavage.
  4. Victor Hugo a sans doute voulu rebondir sur les nouvelles qui lui arrivèrent d’Amérique. L’épidémie de variole du Pacifique Nord-Ouest de 1862, qui a été apportée de San Francisco à Victoria, a dévasté les peuples indigènes de la côte du Pacifique Nord-Ouest, avec un taux de mortalité de plus de 50 % sur toute la côte, de Puget Sound au sud-est de l’Alaska. Certains historiens ont décrit l’épidémie comme un génocide délibéré, car la colonie de l’île de Vancouver et la colonie de la Colombie-Britannique auraient pu la prévenir, mais ont choisi de ne pas le faire, et l’ont en quelque sorte facilitée.
  5. Victor Hugo, La civilisation extrait de Toute la lyre (1888 et 1893).
Merci de partager !

Le « rêve d’Erasme », le Collège des Trois Langues de Louvain

REVUE DE LIVRE :

Le Collège des Trois Langues de Louvain (1517-1797)

Erasme, les pratiques pédagogiques humanistes et le nouvel institut des langues.

Sous la direction de Jan Papy, avec les contributions de Gert Gielis, Pierre Swiggers, Xander Feys & Dirk Sacré, Raf Van Rooy & Toon Van Hal, Pierre Van Hecke.

Edition Peeters, Louvain 2018.
230 pages, 60 €.

__________________________________________________________________

En Belgique, il y a un an, dans la vieille ville universitaire de Louvain, et ensuite à Arlon, une exposition très intéressante a échappé à notre attention.

Réunissant des documents historiques, gravures et manuscrits de la bibliothèque universitaire ainsi que de nombreuses pièces de l’étranger, du 19 octobre 2017 au 18 janvier 2018, l’évènement a voulu, à l’occasion du 500e anniversaire de sa fondation, retracer l’origine et mettre à honneur l’activité du fameux « Collège Trilingue » érigé en 1517 grâce aux efforts du grand humaniste chrétien Erasme de Rotterdam (1467-1536).

Quand on parle de civilisation européenne, c’est bien cette institution, bien que peu connue et de taille modeste, qui en fut l’un des artisans majeurs.

Car tout comme Guillaume le Taciturne (1533-1584), l’organisateur de la révolte des Pays-Bas contre la tyrannie habsbourgeoise, les visionnaires More, Rabelais, Cervantès et Shakespeare s’inspireront de son combat exemplaire, de sa verve et de son grand projet pédagogique.

Vitrail récent représentant Jérôme de Busleyden devant sa résidence à Mechelen. C’est là qu’il introduisit Erasme auprès de Thomas More.

L’occasion pour les Editions Peeters de Louvain de consacrer à cet anniversaire un beau catalogue et plusieurs recueils, publiés aussi bien en néerlandais, en français, qu’en anglais, réunissant les contributions de plusieurs spécialistes sous l’œil avisé (et passionné) de Jan Papy, professeur de littérature latine de la Renaissance à l’Université de la ville, appuyé d’une « équipe trilingue louvainiste » qui n’a pas épargné ses efforts pour relire attentivement toutes les publications ayant trait au sujet et explorer des sources nouvelles dans diverses archives d’Europe.

L’histoire de cet établissement humaniste en est une non seulement d’une remarquable visée scientifique et pédagogique, mais aussi d’efforts obstinés, voire de combats courageux, couronnés d’un succès international sans précédent. Mettant à profit le legs de Jérôme de Busleyden (1470-1517), conseiller au Grand Conseil de Malines, décédé en août 1517, Érasme s’attela aussitôt à la création d’un collège où des savants de renommée internationale prodigueraient un enseignement public et gratuit du latin, du grec et de l’hébreu. Dans ce collège ‘trilingue’, étudiants-boursiers et professeurs vivaient ensemble.

peut-on lire sur la jaquette du catalogue de plus de 200 pages.

Pour les chercheurs, il ne s’agissait pas de retracer de façon exhaustive l’histoire de cette entreprise mais de répondre à la question :

Quelle fut la ‘recette magique’ qui a permis d’attirer aussi rapidement à Louvain entre trois et six cents étudiants venant de partout en Europe ?

Portrait d’Erasme de 1517 par son ami le peintre anversois Quinten Metsys.

En tout cas, la chose est inédite, car, à l’époque, rien que le fait d’enseigner et en plus gratuitement, le grec et l’hébreu —considéré par le Vatican comme hérétique— est déjà révolutionnaire. Et ceci, bien que, dès le XIVe siècle, initié par les humanistes italiens au contact des érudits grecs exilés en Italie, l’examen des sources grecques, hébraïques et latines et la comparaison rigoureuse des grands textes aussi bien des pères de l’Eglise que de l’Evangile, est la voie choisie par les humanistes pour libérer l’humanité de la chape de plomb aristotélicienne qui étouffe la Chrétienté et de faire renaître l’idéal, la beauté et le souffle de l’église primitive.

Pour Erasme, comme l’avait fait avant lui Lorenzo Valla (1403-1457), en promouvant ce qu’il appelle « la philosophie du Christ », il s’agit d’unir la chrétienté en mettant fin aux divisions internes résultant de la cupidité (les indulgences, la simonie, etc.) et des pratiques de superstition religieuse (culte des reliques) qui infectent l’Eglise de haut en bas, en particulier les ordres mendiants.

Pour y arriver, Erasme désire reprendre l’Evangile à sa source, c’est-à-dire comparer les textes d’origine en grec, en latin et en hébreux, souvent inconnus ou sinon entièrement pollués par plus de mille ans de copiages et de commentaires scolastiques.

Frères de la Vie Commune

Wessel Gansfort, détail d’un portrait posthume peint récemment par Jacqueline Kasemier.


Mes recherches propres me permettent de rappeler qu’Erasme est un disciple des Sœurs et Frères de la Vie commune de Deventer au Pays-Bas. Les figures fondatrices et emblématiques de cet ordre laïc et enseignant sont Geert Groote (1340-1384), Florent Radewijns (1350-1400) et Wessel Gansfort (1420-1489) dont on croit savoir qu’ils maitrisaient précisément ces trois langues.

Le piétisme de ce courant dit de la « Dévotion Moderne », centré sur l’intériorité, s’articule à merveille dans le petit livre de Thomas a Kempis (1380-1471), L’imitation de Jésus Christ. Celui-ci souligne l’exemple personnel à suivre de la passion du Christ tel que nous l’enseigne l’Evangile, message qu’Erasme reprendra.

Rudolphe Agricola.

En 1475, le père d’Erasme, qui maîtrise le grec et aurait écouté des humanistes réputés en Italie, envoie son fils de neuf ans au chapitre des frères de Deventer, à l’époque dirigé par Alexandre Hegius (1433-1498), élève du célèbre Rudolphe Agricola (1442-1485), qu’Erasme a eu la possibilité d’écouter et qu’il appelle un « intellect divin ».

Disciple du cardinal-philosophe Nicolas de Cues (1401-1464), défenseur enthousiaste de la renaissance italienne et des belles lettres, Agricola a comme habitude de secouer ses élèves en leur lançant :

Soyez méfiant à l’égard de tout ce que vous avez appris jusqu’à ce jour. Rejetez tout ! Partez du point de vue qu’il faut tout désapprendre, sauf ce que, sur la base de votre autorité propre, ou sur la base du décret d’auteurs supérieurs, vous avez été capable de vous réapproprier.

Erasme reprend cet élan et, avec la fondation du Collège Trilingue, le portera à des hauteurs inédites. Pour ce faire, Erasme et ses amis appliqueront une nouvelle pédagogie.

Désormais, au lieu d’apprendre par cœur des commentaires médiévaux, les élèves doivent formuler leur propre jugement en s’inspirant des grands penseurs de l’antiquité classique, notamment « Saint Socrate », et ceci dans un latin purgé de ses barbarismes. Dans cette approche, lire un grand texte dans sa langue originale n’est que la base.

Vient ensuite tout un travail exploratoire : il faut connaître l’histoire et les motivations de l’auteur, son époque, l’histoire des lois de son pays, l’état de la science et du droit, la géographie, la cosmographie, comme des instruments indispensables pour situer les textes dans leur contexte littéraire et historique.

L’art et la science au peuple. Le début du XVIe siècle a connu un engouement pour les sciences.

Cette approche « moderne » (questionnement, étude critique des sources, etc.) du Collège Trilingue, après avoir fait ses preuves en clarifiant le message de l’Evangile, se répand alors rapidement à travers toute l’Europe et surtout s’étend à toutes les matières, notamment scientifiques !

En sortant les jeunes talents du monde étroit et endormi des certitudes scolastiques, l’institution devient un formidable incubateur d’esprits créateurs.

Certes, cela peut étonner le lecteur français pour qui Erasme n’est qu’un littéraire comique qui se serait perdu dans une dispute théologique sans fin contre Luther. Si l’on admet généralement que sous Charles Quint, les Pays-Bas et l’actuelle Belgique ont apporté leurs contributions à la science, peu nombreux sont ceux qui comprennent le lien unissant Erasme avec la démarche d’un mathématicien tel que Gemma Frisius, d’un cartographe comme Gérard Mercator, d’un anatomiste comme André Vésale ou d’un botaniste comme Rembert Dodoens.

Or, comme l’avait déjà documenté en 2011 le professeur Jan Papy dans un article remarquable, en Belgique et aux Pays-Bas, la Renaissance scientifique de la première moitié du XVIe siècle, n’a été possible que grâce à la « révolution linguistique » provoquée par le Collège Trilingue.

Car, au-delà de leurs langues vernaculaires, c’est-à-dire le français et le néerlandais, des centaines de jeunes, étudiant le grec, le latin et l’hébreu, accèderont d’un coup, à toutes les richesses scientifiques de la philosophie grecque, des meilleurs auteurs latins, grecs et hébreux. Enfin, ils purent lire Platon dans le texte, mais aussi Anaxagore, Héraclite, Thalès, Eudoxe de Cnide, Pythagore, Ératosthène, Archimède, Galien, Vitruve, Pline, Euclide et Ptolémée dont ils reprennent les travaux pour les dépasser ensuite.

Vestiges de l’ancienne muraille de Louvain. Au premier plan, la tour Jansénius, au deuxième, la tour Juste Lipse.


Comme le retracent en détail les œuvres publiées par les Editions Peeters, dans le premier siècle de son existence, le collège dut traverser des moments difficiles à une époque fortement marquée par des troubles politiques et religieux.

Le Collège Trilingue, près du Marché aux poissons, au centre de Louvain, a notamment dû affronter de nombreuses critiques et attaques de la part d’adversaires « traditionalistes », en particulier certains théologiens pour qui, en gros, les Grecs n’étaient que des schismatiques et les Juifs les assassins du Christ et des ésotériques. L’opposition fut telle qu’en 1521, Erasme quitte Louvain pour Bâle en Suisse, sans perdre contact avec l’institution.

En dépit de cela, la démarche érasmienne a d’emblée conquis toute l’Europe et tout ce qui comptait alors parmi les humanistes sortait de cette institution. De l’étranger, des centaines d’étudiants y accouraient pour suivre gratuitement les cours donnés par des professeurs de réputation internationale. 27 universités européennes ont nommé dans leur corps professoral d’anciens étudiants du Trilingue : Iéna, Wittenberg, Cologne, Douai, Bologne, Avignon, Franeker, Ingolstadt, Marburg, etc.

Le Wentelsteen, l’escalier du Collège Trilingue. Crédit : Karel Vereycken


Comme à Deventer chez les Frères de la Vie Commune, un système de bourses permet à des élèves pauvres mais talentueux, notamment les orphelins, d’accéder aux études. « Une chose pas forcément inhabituelle à l’époque, précise Jan Papy, et entreprise pour le salut de l’âme du fondateur (du Collège, c’est-à-dire Jérôme Busleyden) ».

En contemplant les marches usées jusqu’à la corde de l’escalier tournant en pierre (Wentelsteen), l’un des rares vestiges du bâtiment d’alors qui a résisté à l’assaut du temps et du mépris, on imagine facilement les pas enthousiastes de tous ses jeunes élèves quittant leur dortoir situé à l’étage. Comme l’indiquent les registres des achats de la cuisine du Collège Trilingue, pour l’époque, la nourriture y est excellente, beaucoup de viande, de la volaille, mais également des fruits, des légumes, et parfois du vin de Beaune, notamment lorsque Erasme y est reçu.

Avec le temps, la qualité de son enseignement a forcément variée avec celle de ses enseignants, le Collège Trilingue, dont l’activité a perduré pendant longtemps après la mort d’Erasme, a imprimé sa marque sur l’histoire en engendrant ce qu’on qualifie parfois de « petite Renaissance » du XVIe siècle.

Erasme, Rabelais et la Sorbonne

Quitte à nous éloigner du contenu du catalogue, nous nous permettons d’examiner brièvement l’influence d’Erasme et du Collège Trilingue en France.

A Paris, chez les chiens de garde de la bienpensance, c’est la méfiance. La Sorbonne (franciscaine), alarmée par la publication d’Erasme sur le texte grec de L’Evangile de Saint Luc, fait interdire dès 1523 l’étude du grec en France. En Vendée, à Fontenay-le-Comte, les moines du couvent de Rabelais confisquent alors sans vergogne ses livres grecs ce qui incitera l’intéressé à déserter son ordre mais pas ses livres. Médecin, Rabelais traduit par la suite Galien du grec en français. Et, comme le démontre la lettre de Rabelais à Erasme, le premier tient le second en haute estime.

L’Abbaye de Thélème, gravure au burin, d’après la description donnée par Rabelais dans Gargantua, son conte philosophique.

Dans son Gargantua (1534), esquissant les contours d’une Eglise du futur, Rabelais évoque le Collège Trilingue sous le nom d’abbaye de Thélème (Thélème = désir en grec, peut-être une référence à Désiré, prénom d’Erasme), un magnifique bâtiment hexagonal à six étages, digne des plus beaux châteaux de la Loire où l’on puisse retrouver, « les belles grandes librairies, en Grec, Latin, Hébrieu, François, Tuscan et Hespaignol, disparties par les divers estaiges selon langaiges », référence on ne peut plus claire au projet érasmien.

Marguerite de Valois, reine de Navarre. Soeur de François Ier, femme de lettres, poétesse, lectrice d’Erasme et protectrice de Rabelais.

Contre la Sorbonne, en 1530, le Collège Trilingue d’Erasme servira explicitement de modèle pour la création, à l’instigation de Guillaume Budé (ami d’Erasme), du « Collège des lecteurs royaux » (devenu depuis le Collège de France) par François Ier, avec les encouragements de sa sœur Marguerite de Valois reine de Navarre (1492-1549) (grand-mère d’Henri IV), poétesse, femme de lettres et lectrice d’Erasme.

Dans le même élan, en 1539, Robert Estienne est nommé imprimeur du roi pour le latin et l’hébreu, et c’est à sa demande que François Ier fit graver par Claude Garamont une police complète de caractères grecs dits « Grecs du Roi ».

Pour les mettre à l’abri des foudres des sorbonagres et des sorbonicoles, François Ier déclare alors les lecteurs royaux conseillers du roi. A l’ouverture, il s’agit de chaires de lecture publique pour le grec, l’hébreu et les mathématiques mais d’autres chaires suivront dont le latin, l’arabe, le syriaque, la médecine, la botanique et la philosophie. Aujourd’hui, il aurait sans doute ajouté le chinois et le russe.

Ce qui n’empêche pas qu’à peine un an après sa publication, en 1532, Pantagruel, le conte philosophique de Rabelais déchaîne les foudres de la Sorbonne. Accusé d’obscénité, en sus d’apostasie, Rabelais s’en tire de justesse grâce à l’un de ses anciens condisciples, Jean du Bellay (1498-1560), diplomate et évêque de Paris, qui l’emmène à Rome à titre de médecin.

A son retour, les esprits calmés, la bienveillance de François Ier et de Marguerite de Navarre, lui permettent de retrouver son poste à l’Hôtel-Dieu de Lyon.

Si certains historiens de l’Eglise estiment qu’Erasme, à Louvain en particulier, a exagéré et parfois même suscité des réactions hostiles de la part de certains théologiens à son encontre, rappelons tout de même que lors du Concile de Trente (1545-1563), l’œuvre complète d’Erasme, taxée d’hérésie, fut interdite de lecture pour les catholiques et mise à l’Index Vaticanus en 1559 où elle restera jusqu’en 1900 !

Si Thomas More, en qui Erasme voyait son « frère jumeau », a été béatifié en 1886 par le pape Léon XIII, canonisé par Pie XI en 1935 et fait saint patron des responsables de gouvernement et des hommes politiques par Jean-Paul II en l’an 2000, pour Erasme, il va falloir attendre.

Interrogé en 2015 au sujet d’un geste éventuel de réhabilitation en faveur d’un chrétien qui a tant fait pour défendre le christianisme, sa Sainteté le pape François, dans sa réponse écrite, a vivement remercié l’auteur pour ses réflexions.

Reconstruisons le Collège Trilingue !

Reconstitution sous forme d’image numérique, sur la base de documents historiques, du Collège Trilingue de Louvain. Crédit : Visualisations Timothy De Paepe

Ce qui reste du Collège Trilingue aujourd’hui : au fond d’une cour, entourée de bâtiments plus récents et sans intérêt, une petite porte donnant sur la salle d’escalier et une façade refaite au début du XVIIe siècle.

Dans le catalogue de l’exposition, le professeur Jan Papy retrace également le destin qu’ont connu les bâtiments qui abritaient jadis le Collège Trilingue.

Il mentionne notamment la tentative d’un des recteurs de l’Université Catholique de Louvain, de récupérer l’édifice en 1909, un projet qui échoua malheureusement à cause de la Première Guerre mondiale.

Le bâtiment est ensuite transformé en dépôt et en logements sociaux. « Dans la chapelle du Collège Trilingue, on fume alors le hareng et la salle de cours sert d’usine à glace… »

Aujourd’hui, à part l’escalier, rien n’évoque la splendeur historique de cette institution, ce qui fut forcément ressentie lors des commémorations de 2017.

Jan Papy regrette, bien que l’Université ait célébré les 500 ans avec « tout le faste académique requis », que l’ « on ne peut cependant s’empêcher d’éprouver des sentiments équivoques à la pensée que cette même Université n’a toujours pas pris à cœur le sort de cet institut qu’Erasme avait appelé de ses vœux et pour lequel il avait tant œuvré ».

Les restes du bâtiment, certes, dans leur état actuel, n’ont pas grande « valeur », du point de vue « objectif ». Ce n’est qu’en fonction de l’attention subjective que nous leur attribuons, qu’elles ont une valeur inestimable et précieuse comme témoignage ultime d’une partie de notre propre histoire.

Passage actuel (Busleydengang), à partir du Marché à poissons, vers le Collège Trilingue au centre de Louvain.

A cela s’ajoute que reconstruire le bâtiment, dont il ne reste pas grand-chose, coûterait à peine quelque petits millions d’euros, c’est-à-dire pas grand-chose à l’aube des milliards d’euros que brassent nos banques centrales et nos marchés financiers. Des mécènes privés pourraient également s’y intéresser.

Demain ? Reconstitution du portail d’origine donnant sur Collègue Trilingue à partir du marché à poissons. Crédit : Visualisations Timothy De Paepe

De notre point de vue, la reconstruction effective du Collège Trilingue dans sa forme originale, qui constitue en réalité une partie du cœur urbanistique de la ville de Louvain, serait une initiative souhaitable et incontestablement « un énorme plus » sur la carte de visite de la ville, de son Université, des Flandres, de la Belgique et de toute l’Europe. N’est-il pas un fait regrettable, alors que tous les jeunes connaissent les bourses Erasmus, que la plupart des gens ignorent les idées, l’œuvre et le rôle qu’a pu jouer un si grand humaniste ?

Des images en trois dimensions, réalisées dans la cadre de l’exposition sur la base des données historiques, permettent de visualiser un bel édifice, du même type que ceux construit par l’architecte Rombout II Keldermans à l’époque (Note), apte à remplir des missions multiples.

Crédit : Visualisations Timothy De Paepe

Enfin, chaque époque est en droit de « ré-écrire » l’histoire en fonction de sa vision de l’avenir sans pour autant la falsifier. Rappelons également, bien qu’on tende à l’oublier, que la Maison de Rubens (Rubenshuis) à Anvers, un Musée qui attire des milliers de visiteurs chaque année, n’est pas du tout le bâtiment d’origine ! Comme le reconnaît le site du Musée actuel :

La maison de Rubens reste sans doute inchangée jusqu’au milieu du 18e siècle, après quoi elle est entièrement transformée. Les façades sur la rue sont démolies et reconstruites selon le goût de l’époque. La demeure du XVIe siècle est aussi en grande partie remplacée par une bâtisse neuve. Le bâtiment est confisqué par les Français en 1798 et devient une prison pour les religieux condamnés au bannissement. La maison est rachetée par un particulier après l’époque napoléonienne. L’idée de faire de la maison un monument naît dans le courant du XIXe siècle. La Ville d’Anvers en fait l’acquisition en 1937. Les années suivantes seront mises à profit pour rendre autant que possible à la demeure son aspect à l’époque de Rubens. Le musée Maison Rubens ouvre ses portes en 1946. C’est la maison que vous visitez aujourd’hui.

L’annonce officielle d’une reconstruction du bâtiment pourrait éventuellement se faire le 18 octobre 2020, date anniversaire du jour où le Collège Trilingue ouvrait ses portes. Moi j’y serais !


Note: On pense à la Cour de Busleyden et le Palais de Marguerite d’Autriche à Malines ou à la Cour des marquis (Markiezenhof) de Bergen-op-Zoom

Merci de partager !